Viewing: PHI 205 : Introduction to Philosophy

Last approved: Tue, 25 Sep 2018 08:00:55 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 17 Sep 2018 18:31:17 GMT

Changes proposed by: n51ls801
Change Type
Major
PHI (Philosophy)
205
017167
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Introduction to Philosophy
Intro to Philosophy
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
38.0201
Religion/Religious Studies.
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Catherine Driscoll
Associate Professor of Philosophy

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture45050YesNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC10050YesNone
Credit is not allowed for both PHI 205 and PHI 210.

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PHILBAB. A. In PhilosophyElective
16PHILETHPhilosophy-BA Sub-Plan Philosphy Ethics ConcentrationElective
16PHILLAWPhilosophy-BA Sub-Plan Philosophy of Law concentrationElective
16PHILBSPhilosophy-BSElective
16PHILLOGPhilosophy-BS Sub-Plan Logic, Representation and ReasonElective
16PHMMinor in PhilosophyElective
Introduction to selected problems of enduring philosophical importance, including such topics as the nature of morality, knowledge, human freedom, and the existence of God. Content varies with different sections.

No revisions. GEP HUM review required.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Interpret central historical and contemporary philosophical texts and identify the enduring problems and arguments raised in them.
 
 
Quiz questions and paper topics.
Sample paper topic: “How does Anselm’s version of the Ontological Argument for the Existence of a Supreme Being differ from Aquinas’ version? Is Gaunilo’s objection effective against both versions? Explain fully. How does the Ontological Argument remain important for contemporary debates about religion?”
 
 
Identify the premises and conclusions of arguments made in central historical and contemporary philosophy texts and valuate the arguments so identified.
 
 
Paper topics requiring students to reconstruct such arguments and make evaluations of those arguments directed at the features of the reconstructed argument
Sample paper topic: “Explain how Berkeley’s famous slogan, ‘Esse est percipi’ can be interpreted as expressing an argument concerning de re or de dicto modality. Does either version succeed in establishing Berkeley’s intended claim? Explain fully.”
 
 
Develop personal positions in response to arguments found in various historical and contemporary philosophical texts and evaluate those positions using the analytical methods practiced in the course.
 
 
Paper topics and exams questions, especially final paper topics requiring the student to present their own positions in response to philosophical arguments.
Sample final paper topic: “Do you favor Cartesian Dualism or a materialistic alternative as a characterization of human nature? If the former, defend dualism against what you take to be the most serious objection to it. If the latter, explain fully how you think Descartes’ argument for substance dualism fails. Be sure to state the relevant objection or argument carefully. How does your position bear on traditional religious views about ‘life after death’?”
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
na
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
na
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Credit is not allowed for both PHI 205 and PHI 210.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
na
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Philosophy for the 21st century. 1st ed. by Steven M. Cahn (2002) ISBN: 0195147928 $100 new ($12 used)
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
none
The course has been taught in multiple sections - currently about ten per semester, with some in summer sessions - by multiple instructors throughout the department's history. The level of funding determines the number of sections.

Students will:



  1. gain an understanding of selected important philosophical problems,

  2. learn the rudiments of the history of discussions of them,

  3. become aware of the great variety of different views important thinkers have held in dealing with them,

  4. learn reasoning and critical thinking skills needed to analyze philosophical problems, and

  5. gain experience reading, understanding, and critically thinking about difficult philosophical texts.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students completing this course will:



  1. be able to identify a variety of the central problems addressed by contemporary analytic philosophy

  2. be able to recognize and charitably reconstruct arguments in philosophy texts from ancient to contemporary times

  3. be able rigorously to evaluate the deductive soundness or inductive strength of arguments and theories

  4. have developed some positions and arguments of their own in response to some of the above central problems

  5. be able to express those evaluations, views and arguments with clarity in written assignments.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Short Paper15See syllabus
Short Paper15See syllabus
Other30longer paper; See syllabus
Quizzes404 quizzes @ 10
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction to Logic 2 wksSee syllabus
Philosophy of Religion3 wksSee syllabus
Ethics 2 wksSee syllabus
Political Philosophy2 wksSee syllabus
Epistemology2 wksSee syllabus
Philosophy of Science 2 wksSee syllabus
Philosophy of mind2 wksSee syllabus
GER>GEP Providing last approved information
Last approved syllabus- 1992
No university approved GEP information found in records

CIM Notes:
Course objectives added from last approved syllabus
16 weeks added as course length based on university standards
GEP attribute indicated (box checked)
Course delivery needed in CIM
GEP measures and outcomes needed in CIM
Grading/evaluation method needed in CIM
Student Learning Outcomes needed in CIM

Syllabus Notes:

Syllabus review of last approved syllabus based on Syllabus Regulations page: https://policies.ncsu.edu/regulation/reg-02-20-07/

The following statements which can be found at the above link should be added to the syllabus:
-Students with Disabilities
-Academic Integrity
-PRRs
-Electronic Components

The following components should be added to the syllabus:
-Instructor information including office location, hours, and contact information
-Course prerequisites
-GEP information including categories, measures, and outcomes
-Student Learning Outcomes (measurable)
-Course description that includes catalog description as it is listed in CIM
-Any course components (labs, etc.)
-Projected schedule based on 16 week semester
-Grading/evaluation methods
-Instructor's policies on late work and attendance

RLB 06/27/2018
aeherget (Wed, 12 Sep 2018 22:07:56 GMT): AECHH: FS at 9/12/2018 UCCC meeting at adjust the first course student learning outcome to begin with “Identify a variety of the...” to make the outcome measurable and to clarify that the long paper is the final paper.
Key: 4396
Preview Bridge