Viewing: PHI 302 : 19th Century Philosophy

Last approved: Thu, 20 Sep 2018 08:01:07 GMT

Last edit: Sat, 18 Aug 2018 20:53:40 GMT

Changes proposed by: n51ls801
Change Type
Major
PHI (Philosophy)
302
017198
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
19th Century Philosophy
19th Century Philosophy
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
38.0101
Philosophy.
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Marina Bykova
Professor of Philosophy

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3030NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PHILBA B. A. In Philosophy Elective
16PHILETH Philosophy-BA Sub-Plan Philosophy Ethics Concentration Elective
16PHILLAW Philosophy-BA Sub-Plan Philosophy of Law concentration Elective
16PHILBS Philosophy-BS Elective
16PHILLOG Philosophy-BS Sub-Plan Logic, Representation and Reason Elective
16PHM Minor in PhilosophyElective
Western philosophy of the 19th century, including such philosophers as Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Marx, and Nietzsche.

No revision. GEP-HUM review required.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Interpret, analyze and evaluate the accounts of knowledge, will, reason, and subject offered by the philosophers studied in the course and apply them to the human experience.
 
 
Assessment: Essay questions on the exams and the writing assignments. Sample question: “According to Fichte and Hegel, how was Kant’s conception of autonomy insufficient to (in Kant’s famous saying) ‘make room for faith by denying knowledge’?”
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to reconstruct the arguments offered by the philosophers we study in this course.
Relation of Course Specific Learning Outcome to GEP: By analyzing and assessing the arguments of the philosophers we study in this course, students will become aware of how interpretation is a critical form of knowing.
 
 
Assessment: Essay questions on the exams and the writing assignments. Sample question: “How does Kierkegaard argue for his radical conception of faith? Does that conception also presuppose a denial of knowledge? How is this related the ‘sickness unto death’ of the self? Why does the preservation of the subject (the self - a relation which relates itself to itself) require incessant repetition of avowals of faith?”
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to produce their own philosophical arguments about such fundamental human goods pleasure, happiness, rights and rationality.
Relation of Course Specific Learning Outcome to GEP: By producing their own philosophical arguments about such fundamental knowledge, will, reason, and subject, students will become better able to construct and evaluate academic arguments about the human experience using reasons.
 
 
Assessment: Essay questions on the exams and the writing assignments. Sample question: “How does Nietzsche argue against human beings' having free will? Be sure to explain how he relies on a version of epiphenomenalism to support his reasoning.”
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
na
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
na
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Forrest E. Baird, Walter Kaufmann (ed.), Philosophic Classics, Volume IV: Nineteenth Century Philosophy, 3rd ed. (Pearson, 2003). ISBN-10: 0130485500. New: $85.96
Forrest E. Baird, Walter Kaufmann (ed.), Philosophic Classics, Volume III: Modern Philosophy, 6th edition (Pearson, 2011). ISBN-10: 0205783899. New: $82.73
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
none
This is part of Professor Bykova's regular teaching schedule.

Students will:



  1. Discuss the main philosophical concepts (of will, reason, subject, and subjectivity) in European thought of the 19th century. 

  2. Develop skills in analyzing primary philosophical texts.

  3. Recognize the significance of theoretical concepts developed by 1 9th century philosophers for the whole philosophical tradition.

  4. Explore the nature of philosophical inquiry through a consideration of the writings of major figures in the history of Western philosophy of 1 9th century.

  5. Be able to critically evaluate basic philosophical ideas.

  6. Develop skills in writing scholarly papers.


Student Learning Outcomes

This course thus has important learning outcomes that are related to GEP objectives and that shall guide the work over the semester. By the end of the course, the students will:


      be familiar with the main philosophical concepts (of knowledge, will, reason, and subject) in European thought of the 19th century [measures: response paper assignments, exams];


      develop skills in analyzing primary philosophical texts [measures: reading assignments, in-class discussions, response paper assignments];


      know the main theoretical concepts developed by 19th century philosophers and be able to recognize their significance for the whole philosophical tradition [measures: exams, in-class discussions];


      be able to read and respond to philosophical writing critically evaluating basic philosophical ideas and arguments [measures: in-class discussions, reading and response paper assignments, oral presentations];


      be able to express a reasoned philosophical position both orally and in writing [measures: response paper assignments, in-class discussions, oral presentations];


      develop some basic skills in writing philosophy papers [measures: response paper assignment, exam essay questions]


      write and speak with greater confidence about the nature of philosophical inquiry [measures: in class discussions, response paper assignments, oral presentations].


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Essay30See syllabus
Midterm30See syllabus
Final Exam35See syllabus
Participation5See syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
German Idealism: Overview1 wkSee syllabus
Kantian Heritage1 wkSee syllabus
Kant: Experience and Reality1 wkSee syllabus
Kant: The Moral Order1 wkSee syllabus
The Development of Transcendental Idealism1 wkSee syllabus
Fichte’s Concept of God and the Atheism Debate1 wkSee syllabus
Hegel: Main concepts and ideas.1 wkSee syllabus
Hegel’s Dialectic (Alienation, Negation, the Concept)1 wkSee syllabus
Hegel’ s Encyclopedia1 wkSee syllabus
The legacy of and reaction to German idealism: Feuerbach on Religion1 wkSee syllabus
The legacy of and reaction to German idealism: Marx: Early Writings1 wkSee syllabus
The legacy of German idealism: Hegel and the Development of Continental Philosophy1 wkSee syllabus
Philosophy of Will as a reaction to Hegel Schopenhauer and the Will1 wkSee syllabus
Kierkegaard: The Passionate Individual1 wkSee syllabus
Another Philosophy of Will Nietzsche: Beyond Morality1 wkSee syllabus
GER>GEP Providing last approved information
Last approved syllabus- 2001
No university approved GEP information found in records

CIM Notes:
Course objectives added from last approved syllabus
16 weeks added as course length based on university standards
GEP attribute indicated (box checked)
Course delivery needed in CIM
GEP measures and outcomes needed in CIM
Grading/evaluation method added from last approved syllabus
Student Learning Outcomes needed in CIM

Syllabus Notes:

Syllabus review of last approved syllabus based on Syllabus Regulations page: https://policies.ncsu.edu/regulation/reg-02-20-07/

The following statements which can be found at the above link should be added to the syllabus:
-Students with Disabilities (current syllabus does not include the University's current statement)
-Academic Integrity (current syllabus does not include the University's current statement)
-PRRs
-Electronic Components

The following components should be added to the syllabus:
-Course prerequisites or a statement indicating there are none
-Course credit hours and semester
-GEP information including categories, measures, and outcomes
-Student Learning Outcomes (measurable)
-Course description that includes catalog description as it is listed in CIM
-Any course components (labs, etc.)
-Projected schedule based on 16 week semester

RLB 06/27/2018
Key: 4405
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