Viewing: PHI 305 : Philosophy of Religion

Last approved: Thu, 20 Sep 2018 08:01:08 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 10 Sep 2018 19:01:52 GMT

Changes proposed by: n51ls801
Change Type
Major
PHI (Philosophy)
305
017201
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy of Religion
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
38.0201
Religion/Religious Studies.
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Upon Demand
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Timothy Hinton
Professor of Philosophy

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture4040NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PHILBA B. A. In Philosophy Elective
16PHILETH Philosophy-BA Sub-Plan Philosophy Ethics Concentration Elective
16PHILLAW Philosophy-BA Sub-Plan Philosophy of Law concentration Elective
16PHILBS Philosophy-BS Elective
16PHILLOG Philosophy-BS Sub-Plan Logic, Representation and Reason Elective
16PHM Minor in PhilosophyElective
The existence and nature of God, including such topics as traditional proofs of God, skeptical challenges to religious belief, miracles, the problem of evil, faith and reason, and religious experience.

No revision. GEP-HUM review required


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to relate important philosophical accounts of religion to the human experience.
Relation of Course Specific Learning Outcome to GEP: The philosophers we study in this course offer deep, interesting, and controversial arguments about the existence and nature of God. By interpreting these arguments, students will learn to apply them to the human experience.
 
 
Assessment: Questions on the homeworks, the papers, and the final exam. Sample questions might include the following: “Critically examine Augustine’s attempt to make it evident that there is a God”; “Critically evaluate Hume’s argument against miracles.”
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to reconstruct the arguments offered by the philosophers we study in this course.
Relation of Course Specific Learning Outcome to GEP: By analyzing and assessing the arguments of the philosophers we study in this course, students will become aware of how interpretation is a critical form of knowing.
 
 
Assessment: Questions on the homeworks, the papers, and the final exam. Sample questions might include: “Why does Batchelor aspire to a form of Buddhism that is beyond belief?”; “Why does Kant think that religion matters in human life?”
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to produce their own philosophical arguments about such fundamental religious questions as the existence and nature of God, the compatibility of religion and science, and the possibility of non-theistic religion.
Relation of Course Specific Learning Outcome to GEP: By producing their own philosophical arguments about such fundamental religious questions as the existence and nature of God, the compatibility of religion and science, and the possibility of non-theistic religion, students will make academic arguments about the human experience using reasons.
 
 
Assessment: The papers and the final exam. Sample questions might include: “Do chance variation and natural selection rule out the existence of God?”; “Is non-theistic religion possible?”
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
na
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
na
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Aquinas The Treatise on the Divine Nature (Hackett) ($22.00 new)
Augustine On Free Choice of the Will (Hackett) ($12.00 new)
Stephen Batchelor Buddhism Without Beliefs (Riverhead) ($15.00 new)
Mark Johnston Saving God: Religion After Idolatry (Princeton) ($22.00 new)
Immanuel Kant, Religion Within the Bounds of Bare Reason (Hackett) ($18.00 new)
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
none
Professor Hinton teaches one section as his other teaching obligations allow.

GEP suffices


Student Learning Outcomes

GEP suffices


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Attendance5See syllabus
Homework15See syllabus
Readings assignments15See syllabus
Essay402 @ 20; see syllabus
Final Exam25See syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction0.5 wkSee syllabus
Augustine On Free Choice of the Will2 wksSee syllabus
Scotus “The Triple Primacy of the First Principle” 0.5 wkSee syllabus
Aquinas The Treatise on the Divine Nature2.5 wksSee syllabus
Holbach The System of Nature1 wkSee syllabus
Paley / Alter & Howell -Design Arguments1 wkSee syllabus
Kant Religion Within the Bounds of Reason2 wksSee syllabus
Mackie “Evil and Omnipotence” & Cottingham “Religion and Science"1 wkSee syllabus
Johnston, Saving God3.5 wksSee syllabus
Batchelor, Buddhism Without Beliefs1 wkSee syllabus
GER>GEP Providing last approved information
Last approved syllabus 1992

CIM notes:
16 weeks added as course length based on university standards
GEP attribute indicated (box checked)
Grading/ evaluation method added from last approved syllabus
Course objectives added from last approved syllabus
Student learning outcomes needed in CIM
GEP measures and outcomes needed in CIM
Term offering and course delivery needed in CIM

Syllabus notes:

Syllabus review of last approved syllabus based on Syllabus Regulation page: https://policies.ncsu.edu/regulation/reg-02-20-07/

The following components should be added to the syllabus:
(Statements can be found at the above link)
Integrity statement
Students with Disabilities statement
Electronic Components statement
PRR's statement
Course prerequisites or statement indicating there are none
GEP category, measures, and outcomes
Expenses and updated textbook requirements
Student learning outcomes
Course description including catalog description as listed in CIM
Projected schedule based on 16 week semester
Any course components such as labs
Instructor's policies on late work and attendance

RLB 07/02/2018
aeherget (Mon, 10 Sep 2018 19:01:52 GMT): AECHH: Friendly Suggestions from 9/7/2018 CUE Meeting (clarify the engagement in human experience or the interpretation of culture in the first objective. Members suggested, within the sample question, “Critically examine Augustine’s attempt to make it evident that there is a God" adding clarification such as "...there is a God, in the context of the late Roman Empire". & to include the general student learning outcomes in the CIM field.) Associate head of philosophy :"Thanks for the suggestions. The form in CIM can be left as is." email 9/7/2018.
Key: 4406
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