Viewing: PHI 310 : Existentialism

Last approved: Wed, 10 Oct 2018 08:01:00 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 21 Sep 2018 12:07:54 GMT

Changes proposed by: n51ls801
Change Type
Major
PHI (Philosophy)
310
017208
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Existentialism
Existentialism
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
38.0201
Religion/Religious Studies.
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Marina Bykova
Professor of Philosophy

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3030NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PHILBA B. A. In Philosophy Elective
16PHILETH Philosophy-BA Sub-Plan Philosophy Ethics Concentration Elective
16PHILLAW Philosophy-BA Sub-Plan Philosophy of Law concentration Elective
16PHILBS Philosophy-BS Elective
16PHILLOG Philosophy-BS Sub-Plan Logic, Representation and Reason Elective
16PHM Minor in PhilosophyElective
16ETHMMinor in EthicsElective
Philosophy of Existentialism, including such thinkers as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Doestoevsky, Sartre, Heidegger, and Camus.

No revisions. GEP-HUM review required


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able describe the significance, for philosophy and our own lives, of the central issues of existentialism (such as questions about the free will and determinism, alienation of subjectivity, autonomy of subject and intersubjectivity, etc.) and the answers and solutions to these issues offered by existentialist thinkers.
 
 
Assessment: Written (exam and response paper) assignments on main existentialist notions and conceptions.
Sample response paper topic: “Do any of Camus, Sartre and Heidegger view suicide as morally permissible? If never permissible, why not? If sometimes permissible, under what circumstances would suicide be morally permissible?”
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to successfully read and analyze primary philosophical texts.
 
 
Assessment: Students are required to read primary texts. Questions about the readings will be posed in written homework assignments and research papers. Throughout the semester the students will be researching different course topics. At the end of the semester they will be invited to give presentations to report on their findings. Their research will be reflected in research papers that will be graded as one of the course assignments. Ex. Sample exam question: “What is the role of self-consciousness in Sartre’s work? Can the concept sustain the heavy weight that he places on it? Or will it be (figuratively) swallowed by an abyss of existential anguish and despair?”
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to critique existentialist writings by evaluating their basic philosophical ideas and arguments.
 
 
Assessment: Response paper assignments and the final research paper. Sample exam question: “Present, explain and evaluate Heidegger’s argument for his famous conclusion: ‘the nothing itself noths or nihilates [das Nichts selbst nichtet]’ so as to resolve its paradoxical appearance.”
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
na
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
na
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
L. Nathan Oaklander (ed.), Existentialist Philosophy. An Introduction, 2nd edition (Prentice Hall, 1996) ISBN 0-13-373861-2. The textbook should be available at the NCSU Bookstore. [The text is sold on amazon.com - new: $81.71, used: $9.50]
Blaise Pascal, Pensees, in: Steven Luper (ed.). Existing: An Introduction to Existential Thought. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield, 2000. pp. 19-22.
Martin Heidegger, Letter On Humanism, in: Paul MacDonald (ed.), The Existentialist Reader. pp. 236-269.
Jean-Paul Sartre, New, Authentic Way Of Being Oneself, in: Paul MacDonald (ed.), The Existentialist Reader. pp. 302-342.
Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism Is a Humanism, John Kulka (ed.), Yale University Press, 2007, pp. 17-54.
Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism and Human Emotions, Citadel Press, 1985.
The required texts by Pascal, Heidegger, and Sartre are available on course electronic reserve at http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/reserves/ or at the course website in Classic Wolfware.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
none
The course is part of Professor Bykova's regular teaching schedule.

GEP suffices


Student Learning Outcomes

GEP suffices


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Written Assignment305 @ 6; see syllabus
Participation10See syllabus
Midterm25See syllabus
Final Exam35See syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Background information on Existentialism1 wkSee syllabus
Kierkegaard, Concluding Unscientific Postscript1 wkSee syllabus
Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling1 wkSee syllabus
Nietzsche: Beyond Morality1 wkSee syllabus
Nietzsche: The Will to Power and the Übermensch (Overman)1 wkSee syllabus
Sartre, Existentialism is a Humanism1 wkSee syllabus
Sartre, Existentialism is a Humanism Heidegger, Letter on Humanism1 wkSee syllabus
Heidegger, Letter on Humanism Heidegger, Being and Time1 wkSee syllabus
Heidegger, Being and Time1 wkSee syllabus
Sartre, New, Authentic Way Of Being Oneself, Sartre, Being and Nothingness 1 wkSee syllabus
Sartre, Being and Nothingness [Brief Overview] Camus, The Myth of Sisyphus 2 wksSee syllabus
Camus, The Myth of Sisyphus and The Stranger1 wkSee syllabus
Camus, The Myth of Sisyphus and The Stranger; Wrapping up 1 wkSee syllabus
GER>GEP Providing last approved information
Last approved syllabus 2002

CIM notes:
16 weeks added as course length based on university standards
GEP attribute indicated (box checked)
Grading/ evaluation method added from last approved syllabus
Course objectives added from last approved syllabus
Student learning outcomes needed in CIM
GEP measures and outcomes needed in CIM
Course delivery needed in CIM

Syllabus notes:

Syllabus review of last approved syllabus based on Syllabus Regulation page: https://policies.ncsu.edu/regulation/reg-02-20-07/

The following components should be added to the syllabus:
(Statements can be found at the above link)
Integrity statement
Students with Disabilities statement (current syllabus has incorrect Disability Resources location)
Electronic Components statement
PRR's statement
Course prerequisites or statement indicating there are none
GEP category, measures, and outcomes
Student learning outcomes
Course description including catalog description as listed in CIM
Projected schedule based on 16 week semester
Any course components such as labs

RLB 07/02/2018
aeherget (Wed, 12 Sep 2018 22:15:22 GMT): PHI 310 was approved at today's UCCC meeting with the following friendly suggestions: -Quantification of the value of participation and extra credit, clarifying how much extra credit is available in terms of percentage. -Matching the student learning outcomes in CIM with the syllabus.
aeherget (Fri, 21 Sep 2018 12:07:54 GMT): AECHH: General Course SLOs same as GEP SLOs, no action to copy into CIM field based on 9/12/2018 UCCC Friendly suggestion.
Key: 4407
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