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Viewing: COS 100 : Science of Change

Last approved: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 15:10:14 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 23 Jun 2016 15:09:54 GMT

Change Type
Major
COS (College of Sciences)
100
017507
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Science of Change
Science of Change
College of Sciences
COS Deans Office (17COSD)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Summer 1 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
3
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
COS 295SS II 14, SSII 15 F 1540
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
2
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture2.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Carrie Thomas
Research Associate Professor and Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture24080YesN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Restriction: New freshmen (NFR) in the College of Sciences only
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
17AMATHBSApplied MathematicsRequired
17CHEMBAChemistryRequired
17CHEMBSChemistryRequired
17GEOLBSGeologyRequired
17MARSCBSMarine SciencesRequired
17MATHBSMathematicsRequired
17METBSMeteorologyRequired
17PHYSBAPhysicsRequired
17PHYSBSPhysicsRequired
17STBSStatisticsRequired
This course will examine change, both scientific and personal. Students will reflect on change in the past and looking forward as they transition to college life and scientific careers. Case studies, readings and discussions about global change topics will be used to highlight the scientific approaches of disciplines represented in the College of Sciences. In-class activities and out-of-class reflections will be used to practice skills necessary for success in college and career.

COS 100 serves as the orientation course for freshmen in the College of Sciences.  The course has not been revised in years and has become dated.  Previously the course was a series of panel discussions and a unit on computing.  This revision increases the number of credits by one, allowing significant time to be spent on project-based learning designed to incorporate critical and creative thinking as well as the process of science.  The revisions also allow the course to meet 2 credit hours of Interdisciplinary Perspectives within the GEP.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will characterize the contribution of at least two scientific
disciplines in the College of Sciences to the current understanding of global
change (e.g. historical temperature records, sea level rise, and biodiversity)
 
 
Students will complete in-class activities and a semester-long project. The semester-long project that was specifically designed to assess each of the IP objectives.

An overview of the semester project is attached.

An example of an in-class activity is:
Each person is given the name of a scientist who has contributed to climate science. They are asked to go online and research the person’s contribution, their disciplinary training (degrees) and the discipline in which they worked and how it connects to climate science. They then introduce the person to the rest of the class. Once everyone has shared, we discuss how the contributions fit together like jig saw pieces and advance the science. They then summarize an example of multiple disciplines working on a common problem for the credit (e.g. discoveries in math, chemistry and optics and the discovery of the greenhouse effect or black body radiation).
 
 
Students will identify and briefly describe the approach each discipline
uses to address selected issues within the topic of global change and explain
how these approaches are similar and how they are different.
 
 
Students will complete in-class activities and a semester-long project. The semester-long project that was specifically designed to assess each of the IP objectives.

An overview of the semester project is attached.
 
 
Students will discuss how these disciplines work together to advance the
science
 
 
Students will complete in-class activities and a semester-long project. The semester-long project that was specifically designed to assess each of the IP objectives.

An overview of the semester project is attached.

An example of an in-class activity is:

Students are asked to read "A Living Time Capsule Shows the Human Mark on Evolution" and to come to class with answers to reflection questions about the reading. The reading focuses on scientists who use genetic archives in lacustrine sediments to derive historical information including past water chemistry, timing of human expansion into the area, and climate/environmental conditions. In class we have a larger group discussion about the reading and the disciplinary approaches and connections in the reading.
 
 
The disciplines included in the College of Sciences, including but not limited to the Life Sciences, Physics, Mathematics, Statistics, Chemistry, Marine Science, Geology, and Atmospheric Sciences. All disciplines are addressed, but each semester a subset is considered with particular focus based on the guest speakers. For example, last fall we focused on Life Sciences, Statistics, Marine Science, Geology, and Atmospheric Sciences the most.
 
 
The instructor uses multi-media materials (readings, video, websites, guest speakers) from the various disciplines with coordinated assignments and discussions around a common problem such as climate change. In addition, the students are placed in interdisciplinary groups.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
0
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
This course is restricted to incoming freshmen in the College of Sciences.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
Yes
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
New freshmen in the College of Sciences only
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
Throughout the semester, guest speakers representing the various disciplines in the College of Sciences present to the class. For example, a faculty member in Statistics prepared and presented lectures on predictive modeling. Also, a faculty member in the life sciences prepared and led a a class activity on the impact of changing environmental conditions on the evolution of Daphnia. A graduate student in Atmospheric Sciences led a lesson on global climate models. A final example is the guest presentation by a librarian on different search engines and publications associated with the disciplines within the College of Sciences.
No new resources are required for this course. This course will be taught in the new scale up rooms in Cox Hall.

Student Learning Outcomes

Students will:

- Identify and apply the intellectual standards of critical and creative thinking.

- Examine and contrast the process of science in different disciplines.

- Compare and critique different forms of communication in science, explaining their purpose and place.

- Create a poster communicating about an interdisciplinary scientific issue.

- Analyze and assess how scientists recognize, measure and predict change.

- Differentiate between transitional stages and master skills for adjustment to and success in college.

- Work successfully in teams to complete projects.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Project200There are 2 projects, each worth 100 points
Written Assignment100There are 4 weekend challenges which require a short reading and written reflection, each worth 25 points.
Participation100There are 20 in-class activities worth 5 points each.

Key: 4440