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Viewing: PS 303 : Race in U.S. Politics

Last approved: Fri, 16 Dec 2016 09:00:57 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 15 Dec 2016 21:25:48 GMT

Change Type
Major
PS (Political Science)
303
018066
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Race in U.S. Politics
Race in US Politic
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Political Science (16PS)
Term Offering
Fall and Summer
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Michael Cobb, PhD
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC3535Non/a
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PSBABA Political Science Elective
16PSINTBA Political Science: International Politics Elective
16PSPUBBA Political Science: Public Policy Elective
16PSBSBS Political Science Elective
16OSMPolitical Science Minor Elective
Race in American politics with emphasis on the African-American political experience: civil rights legislation, voting rights, political representation, campaigns and party politics, survey attitudes, and public policies including affirmative action.

Formal GEP review and adding to CourseLeaf system.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Social Sciences
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will evaluate the importance of race in the political party system, voting behavior, and policy preferences.
 
 
Reaction paper 2 prompt:

How is racial prejudice different than racism?  What are racial stereotypes?  How are these three concepts similar yet different?  How does this affect their measurement?  Are there specific problems you see with measuring racial attitudes in surveys to try and understand their importance?

In what ways does race affect Americans' policy preferences?  Have these relationships changed since the election of Obama?  Why/Why not?

So, do Americans "hate" welfare?  What seems to best explain how white Americans think about social welfare in the US?  Why is this the case?  Importantly, how might attitudes about welfare change in the future?
 
 
Students will evaluate evidence gathered using different social science methods to consider how race might or might not matter to specific aspects of American politics.
 
 
Reaction paper 1 prompt:

What evidence supports the claim that racial prejudice is important to understanding election outcomes? What evidence contradicts it? Which evidence carries greater weight?

Why is a racial issue sometimes brought up during a campaign, and other times it is not?  When is it appropriate to do so? When is it not?

How exactly does the racial environment interact with party identification to explain candidate behavior in the South?  Since much of this evidence was generated decades ago, what evidence can you think of to suggest the same dynamics exist today, or do you think the effects and importance of the racial context is different today?
 
 
Students will assess the the relationship between race and political representation.
 
 
Reaction paper 3 prompt:

What are the reasons some scholars support certain rules and procedures to make it more likely black representatives will be elected to legislative bodies like Congress?  What are the reasons to oppose these practices?  Where do you stand, and why?

What is the difference between descriptive and substantive representation? How does the race of the representative affect the substantive representation of black interests?

How are election rules and procedures tied to issues of race and representation? What rules are most likely to impede the ability of black voters to fairly elect their preferred representatives? Why?
Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Students will evaluate the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, legal arguments, policy developments, and historical trends which are forces that shape the social construction of race, race relations and politics.
 
 
On-line participation in Moodle Forum. Students are expected to begin two of their own discussion threads and respond to at least five other threads. These contributions will be graded according to how well they can place current news/events regarding race and politics into the larger social and historical context.
 
 

 
 

 
 
Students will analyzing the importance of race in contemporary American politics by exercising critical reasoning and communications skills.
 
 
Four reaction papers with the following prompt:

The purpose of the Reaction Paper is to encourage you to think about what you have read and viewed, and how that material applies to you. You must turn in four reaction papers throughout the term. Do not simply paraphrase or outline the readings; instead, identify the primary issues you gleaned from the assigned readings and apply that to your experiences, knowledge and judgments of the material. You will be need to briefly describe what you consider to be the two or three primary and integrative points or issues contained in the readings. Explain how these points or issues integrate with the materials covered in the class thus far. Then, briefly describe questions/challenges you have regarding the readings and explain why they are important questions/challenges.
 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
no restrictions
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Pre-requisite: sophomore standing.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Gilens, Martin. 1999. Why Americans Hate Welfare. Chicago: University of Chicago
Press.

Glaser, James M. 1996. Race, Campaign Politics, & the Realignment in the South. Yale
University Press.

Grose, Christian R. 2011. Congress in Black and White: Race and Representation in
Washington and Home. Cambridge University Press
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
no change
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
no change
Course is already a regular offering within the PS Department and will continue to be.

The principal question we address in this course is: How much, and in what ways, does race matter in American politics? Although the title suggests the content of this course is broadly about “race”, we will narrowly focus on the contemporary political experiences of African-Americans, particularly vis-à-vis whites. We will explore the importance of race in four areas of politics: (1) policy preferences and their relationship to prejudice, (2), political communication about race, (3) the party system and voting behavior, and (4) the relationship between race and political representation. Within each, the question we tackle is, how and why does race matter. For example, some scholars argue that whites’ racial prejudice continues to explain their political preferences about other issues, while others argue that class, ideology and partisanship best explain whites’ preferences. What is the evidence?


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course students will be able to:

1) evaluate the importance of race in the political party system, voting behavior, and policy preferences;

2) evaluate evidence gathered using different social science methods to consider how race might or might not matter to specific aspects of American politics;

3) assess the relationship between race and political representation;

4) evaluate the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, legal arguments, policy developments, and historical trends which are forces that shape the social construction of race, race relations and politics;

5) analyze the importance of race in contemporary American politics by exercising critical reasoning and communications skills. 


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation25%Class participation

Short Paper75%Four reaction papers, each worth 18.75%
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached syllabus and weekly topics
Per Steven Greene submissions, tweaked SLO's, uploaded revised syllabus (added grading scale, adjusted weekly schedule, adjusted SEMs), tweaked SEM's; JSD 11/8/2016
aeherget (Fri, 07 Oct 2016 17:59:30 GMT): AECHH: Uploading syllabus at instructor's request. 10/7/2016
aeherget (Fri, 07 Oct 2016 18:08:25 GMT): AECHH: Input grading information at instructors request via email. 10/7/2016
aeherget (Fri, 07 Oct 2016 18:13:44 GMT): AECHH: Updated student learning outcomes at instructor's request via email. 10/7/2016
aeherget (Thu, 13 Oct 2016 17:07:58 GMT): AECHH: Updating prereq statement to restrictive to sync with syllabus. 10/13/2016
Key: 4570