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Viewing: PS 236 : Issues in Global Politics

Last approved: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:18:38 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 19 Apr 2016 13:55:31 GMT

Change Type
Major
PS (Political Science)
236
018023
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Issues in Global Politics
Issues Global Pol
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Political Science (16PS)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Heidi Hobbs, PhD
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535Non/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PSBABA Political Science Elective
16PSAMBA Political Science: American Politics Elective
16PSINT BA Political Science: International Politics Elective
16PSLJJBA Political Science: Law and Justice, Justice Systems Elective
16PSLJLBA Political Science: Law and Justice, Law and Theory Elective
16PSPUBBA Political Science: Public Policy Elective
16PSBSBS Political Science Elective
16OSMPolitical Science Minor Elective
Selected problems facing the world community, related political issues, and international responses to them, including international trade, economic development, wars, arms control, terrorism, ethnic conflict, human rights, status of women, population growth, food security, and environmental degradation.

Formal GEP review and adding to CourseLeaf system. Term offering.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Social Sciences
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Analyze issues, actors, institutions, cultures, ideologies, and policy instruments, as well as the relationship among them, which condition and affect the primary issues and events confronting the peoples of the world.
 
 
Sample measure:
Homework #1: Climate Change and My Carbon Footprint
For this assignment you will calculate your carbon footprint using the calculator from this website: http://www.carbonfootprint.com/calculator.aspx.
After completing your calculation, please answer the following questions:
§ What is the incentive for people to reduce their carbon footprint? Are there differences globally in how people relate to this issue?
§ How can you reduce your carbon footprint? How easy or difficult would it be to make these lifestyle changes?
 
 
Apply critical thinking, analytical, and effective communication skills as a way to prepare for citizenship in a global era.
 
 
Sample measure:
Homework #3: The Global Economy of Your Stuff!
For this assignment, you must first choose a favorite personal item to research – a favorite shirt, shoe or technological device. After identifying why you have chosen this item – love it, couldn’t live without it, feels good, looks great, etc. Please answer the following questions:
a. Where was the item made?
b. What are the primary exports and imports of the country of origin?
c. What are the country’s GDP and GDP per capita?
d. How many of this country’s citizens are living below the poverty line?
e. What is this country’s literacy rate?
f. Is this country party to any free trade agreements and, if so, which ones?
 
 
Evaluate and critique alternative explanations and interpretations as to what drives the policy process.
 
 
Sample measure: Homework #2: Who is a Terrorist?

On July 2, 2015, the US Freedom Act was passed by the US Senate and signed into law by President Obama.  It restored several of the provisions of the Patriot Act that had just expired. 
While it eliminated the broad collection of phone data for millions of Americans that was being gathered by the National Security Agency and exposed by Edward Snowden, it continued many of the controversial practices that originated under the Patriot Act that grew out of the 9/11 attacks, including roving wiretaps and counterterrorism data collection.  House and Senate leaders were divided on the issue, splitting along more personal lines rather than party affiliation. 
With reports of Americans being linked with terrorist organizations, how far should such monitoring go?  In your response, please address the following questions:
·       How do we define terrorism?
·       To what extent should the government have broad authority to monitor our private communications to prevent terrorism?
Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Analyze issues, actors, and cultures which condition and affect the primary issues and events confronting the peoples of the world.
 
 
Sample measure:
Homework #3: The Global Economy of Your Stuff!
For this assignment, you must first choose a favorite personal item to research – a favorite shirt, shoe or technological device.  After identifying why you have chosen this item – love it, couldn’t live without it, feels good, looks great, etc.  Please answer the following questions: 
a.       Where was the item made?
b.       What are the primary exports and imports of the country of origin?
c.       What are the country’s GDP and GDP per capita?
d.       How many of this country’s citizens are living below the poverty line?
e.       What is this country’s literacy rate?
f.        Is this country party to any free trade agreements and, if so, which ones?
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Analyze issues, cultures, ideologies, and policy instruments, as well as the relationship among them, which condition and affect the primary issues and events confronting the peoples of the world.
 
 
Sample measure:
Homework #4: This is okay in my country!
A couple of years ago, Annette Sorensen, 30, an actress from Copenhagen, Denmark, and Exavier Wardlaw, 49, a movie production assistant from Brooklyn, New York, were arrested for leaving their 14-month-old daughter outside a Manhattan restaurant on a chilly day, while they ate inside the restaurant. They left her in her baby carriage on the sidewalk. Many passersby called 911 to alert the police. New York authorities took the child away from her parents and temporarily placed her in foster care.

In an ensuing article in the New York Times, one Danish commentator observed that leaving a baby outside of a restaurant is a very common practice in Denmark. The commentator wrote, “Often, Danish parents…leave their babies outside. For one thing, Danish baby carriages are enormous. Babies ride high above the world on horse-carriage-size wheels. It’s hard to get such a carriage into a café…Besides, Danish cafes are very smoky places.” The commentator continued, “In Denmark, people have an almost religious conviction that fresh air, preferably cold air, is good for children. All Danish babies nap outside, even in freezing weather—tucked warmly under their plump goose-down comforters…In Denmark all children own a sort of polar survival suit that they wear from October to April, and they go out every day, even in winter.”

What is cultural relativism?
·       Were the parents’ actions right or wrong? Why?
·       How might this situation have played out differently in Denmark?
·       What role does cultural relativism play in addressing global issues?
·       Can you think of an example where you have experienced cultural relativism?
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
There are no restrictions.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Chernotsky and Hobbs, Crossing Borders: International Studies for the 21st, 2nd edition.
ISBN: 9781483376073

CQ Press, Global Issues 2015. ISBN: 9781506308357
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
no change
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
no change
Course is already a regular offering within the PS Department and will continue to be.

This course introduces you to the critical issues facing the world today.  First, we will build a foundation for our study by examining the concept of globalization and the many ways it is defined and interpreted today, particularly as it relates to issues of global concern. We will explore our role as global citizens, the finite nature of the planet, and the technology that drives our daily interaction.  We will then look at the way in which different fields frame our responses to the most pressing global issues. Finally, we will return to the concept of global citizenship and identify how we can be more directly involved in addressing global problems.  


This course meets both the GEP social science requirement and global knowledge co-requisite.  As such, our focus will be on expanding our understanding of both social science methods, as well as exploring the cultural differences that exist in the world today and how they related to complex global issues.  


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1. analyze how scholars, policymakers, and individuals living in various regions of the world understand and explain the topics covered in this course, and consider and evaluate the impact of policies that attempt to address these issues.

2. apply critical thinking, analytical, and effective communication skills as a way to prepare for citizenship in a global era.

3. evaluate and critique alternative explanations and interpretations as to what drives the policy process.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Other100no change
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
see attached weekly topics
Match of GEP LO and the Student Learning Outcomes? Scott D
despain (Tue, 15 Mar 2016 19:19:45 GMT): Rollback: Outcome tweaking
shgreene (Tue, 15 Mar 2016 19:26:16 GMT): Rollback: Textbook/outcomes
Key: 4578