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Viewing: PS 201 : American Politics and Government

Last approved: Tue, 03 May 2016 08:42:48 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 15 Mar 2016 19:34:43 GMT

Change Type
PS (Political Science)
201
017992
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
American Politics and Government
American Politics & Government
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Political Science (16PS)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Laboratory0.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Andrew Taylor, PhD
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture4040YesN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
None.
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PSBABA Political ScienceRequired
16PSAMBA Political Science: American PoliticsRequired
16PSINTBA Political Science: International PoliticsRequired
16PSLJJBA Political Science: Law and Justice, Justice SystemsRequired
16PSLJLBA Political Science: Law and Justice, Law and TheoryRequired
16PSPUBBA Political Science: Public PolicyRequired
16PSBSBS Political ScienceRequired
16OSMPolitical Science MinorElective
Analysis of American political institutions and processes, including the constitution, political culture, campaigns and elections, political parties, interest groups, the media, the president, congress, the federal courts, and public policy. Discussion of contemporary and controversial issues in American politics. Emphasis on placing current issues in comparative and historical perspective where relevant.

Formal GEP review and adding to CourseLeaf system.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Social Sciences
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will evaluate the basic features and functions of the three branches of the federal government and their places in the American constitutional system.
 
 
Exams, written assignments.

e.g. term paper question:

Divided government—that is, split-party control of Congress and the presidency—is the norm in this country. Between 1969 and 2015, we have experienced divided government around 80% of the time.
Many political scientists argue that divided government leads to “gridlock” and the government cannot seem to get anything done. Others argue that divided government is not problematic and that “gridlock” can occur during unified government.
What do you think causes divided government? That is, why do many voters prefer to send members of one party to represent them in Congress and members of the other party to be their presidents?
What do you think are the consequences of divided government? Need divided government result in gridlock or can it produce important legislation? Explain your answer and use examples to illustrate your argument.
 
 
Students will examine how social science methods can be used in the study of American government and politics.
 
 
Exams, written assignments.

e.g. exam, short answer question

How do survey researchers discern the views of American voters? To whom do they ask questions? What methods do they use?
 
 
Students will analyze how public policy might improve Americans' quality of life.
 
 
Exams, written assignments.

e.g. term paper question

What do you think is the number one domestic policy problem facing the United States today? Why is this problem so important? That is, (1) explain that the policy is an important issue (it should not, therefore, be price supports for dairy farmers) and (2) that the problem is large (you should not, therefore, be worried about a problem arising from an important issue that costs taxpayers $5 million a year or adversely affects just 50,000 Americans).
What can be done to fix the problem? Please be fairly specific when discussing your solution. You should, for example, if relevant, talk about budgetary aspects, how your solution would be administered, short- and long-term effects on societal behavior etc. etc..
Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
There are no restrictions.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Bianco, William T. and David T. Canon., American Politics Today, (Fourth Essentials
Edition), W.W. Norton and Co.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
no change
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
no change
Course is already a regular offering within the PS Department and will continue to be.

This course is for students with only a rudimentary understanding of American politics and government. It has three main purposes: (1) Substantive Information: You will learn about the major actors, institutions, ideas, concepts, themes and controversies in American politics. (2) Citizenship Skills: You will gain necessary information and competencies to become active citizens. Such skills will help you participate in public life and make informed decisions. (3) Professional Skills: You will learn skills vital for success in the labor market. Such skills include, but are not limited to, writing (these will be developed when you do the final exam), argumentation (honed by the paper and our discussions), and critical analysis (we will try to solve interesting puzzles by identifying and testing possible solutions). 


Student Learning Outcomes

1. Students will evaluate the basic features and functions of the three branches of the federal government and their places in the American constitutional system.


2. Students will examine how social science methods can be used in the study of American government and politics.


3. Students will analyze how public policy might improve Americans' quality of life.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Other100no change
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
see attached weekly topics
Work with Karen to move current SLO to CO and drop GEP SLO's to SLO slot, add textook, etc, JSD, 3/15/2016
shgreene (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 20:33:28 GMT): Rollback: This sucks! Kidding. My fault.
despain (Tue, 15 Mar 2016 13:24:20 GMT): Rollback: Adjust objective, learning outcomes, etc.
shgreene (Tue, 15 Mar 2016 17:28:11 GMT): Rollback: Adjust as per discussion.
Key: 4586