Viewing: PS 335 : International Law

Last approved: Sat, 27 Oct 2018 08:01:15 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 27 Sep 2018 19:50:07 GMT

Changes proposed by: secamill
Change Type
Major
PS (Political Science)
335
018104
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
International Law
International Law
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Political Science (16PS)
45.1001
Political Science and Government, General.
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Michael Struett
Associate professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535Non/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
none

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PSBABA Political Science Elective
16PSAMBA Political Science: American Politics Elective
16PSINTBA Political Science: International Politics Elective
16PSLJJBA Political Science: Law and Justice, Justice Systems Elective
16PSLJLBA Political Science: Law and Justice, Law and Theory Elective
16PSPUBBA Political Science: Public Policy Elective
16PSBSBS Political Science Elective
16OSMPolitical Science Minor Elective
Usefulness and limitations of international law, including obligations and immunities of sovereign states, non-state actors, peaceful settlement of disputes, human rights, laws of war, and recent international war crimes tribunals. Emphasis on individual case decisions in U.S. and international courts.

Formal SS GEP review and adding to CourseLeaf system.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Social Sciences
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Evaluate which institutions and individuals benefit or are disadvantaged by international law.
 
 
Sample exam question:
The International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia (ICTY) prosecuted only:
___ (a) Serbian Serbs
___ (b) Croats
___ (c) Bosnian Serbs
___ (d) Bosnian Muslims
___ (e) Kosovar Albanian Muslims
___ (f) Serbian Serbs and Bosnian Serbs
___ (e) all of the above
 
 
Critique the benefits and weaknesses of using case law studies for studying and understanding international law.
 
 
Students will choose from one of a listof "landmark" national and international court decisions. They will write a written brief of the case to Moodle and orally present to class for a grade.
 
 
Using appropriate theories, apply the evaluation of international law to real-world problems facing the international community.
 
 
Sample exam questions:

Applying the precedents set by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in the 1928 case of
U. S. v. Netherlands (Island of Palmas) and the Permanent Court of International Justice in
the 1933 case of Denmark v. Norway (Eastern Greenland):

Do Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea have stronger claims to sovereignty over the
disputed islands in the East China Sea because the islands are closer to them than to China?
___ (a) yes
___ (b) no

The “protests” challenging the Chinese claim of sovereignty in the form of the United
States and the Japanese over-flights of the islands:
___ (a) strengthen the legal claim of China
___ (b) weaken the legal claim of China
___ (c) have no effect on the legal claim of China

Does the fact that the islands are uninhabited (terra nullius)
___ (a) strengthen the legal claim of China
___ (b) weaken the legal claim of China
___ (c) have no effect on the legal claim of China
Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
previously approved under expedited review.
 
 
previously approved under expedited review.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
no restrictions
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Van Devort, Thomas R. International Law and Organization: An Introduction
Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications (1997)
Moghalu, Kingsley Chiedu. Global Justice: The Politics of War Crimes Trials
Westport, Connecticut: Praeger Security International (2006)
Charter of the United Nations and Statute of the International Court of Justice
New York: UN Department of Public Information (1945,1945)
Constitution of the US (1787, 1788)
Declaration of Independence (1776)
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
no change
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
no change
Course is already a regular offering within the PS Department and will continue to be.

A. Learn History



  1. Recognize the conventional academic and diplomatic terminologies of international law.

  2. Know the significance of 50 plus “landmark” national and international court decisions; Teach classmates by written briefs and oral presentations (formats pp. 16-17 or 18-19)

  3. Observe the influence/irrelevance of international law on politics & economics (historical & current)

  4. Identify national governments, corporations, IGOs and NGOs that create international law


B. Evaluate History



  1. Invent new terminologies that better describe evolving realities, e.g., “pooling sovereignty”

  2. Identify trends and cutting-edge issues years before the general public catches on; Critically consider and discuss classmates’ case presentations (cases in syllabus pp. 13-14)

  3. Form and defend judgments about the usefulness – or not – of international law

  4. Which institutions & individuals benefit  or are disadvantaged by international law


C.  Make History



  1. Apply our history learned to life-long learning about international law

  2. Apply our evaluation of international law:

    1. to other disciplines we study, e.g. foreign policy, psychology, anthropology, etc.

    2. to career choices in entrepreneurship, business, education, government, IGO,NGO, etc.

    3. to support candidates for office and office-holders, especially at national level

    4. to groups we join for public policy advocacy, lobbying, culture. religion, etc.

    5. to choices we make as voters, consumers, family members, and friends




Student Learning Outcomes

1. Describe major events in the historical development of international law.

2. Analyze the role of international law in promoting a stable international political system.

3. Explain the primary rules of the International legal system, including the processes of treaty negotiation and entry into force and the development of customary rules of international law.

4. Brief the major legal findings of crucial judicial cases in international law and assess the legal reasoning in those decisions.

5. Analyze the way that the rules of international law and political power interact to produce outcomes in international politics by enabling and constraining possible courses of action.

6. Analyze legal discourse as a tool of political influence and power.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Midterm25%Midterm exam
Quizzes25%Reading quizzes; see syllabus
Participation10%Participation and current events; see syllabus
Written Assignment15%Case briefs; see syllabus
Final Exam25%Final exam
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See syllabus

aeherget (Mon, 24 Sep 2018 13:18:18 GMT): AECHH: PS 335 was approved at the Friday 9/21/2018 CUE meeting with the friendly suggestion to provide measures that align clearly with the GEP learning outcomes provided. The committee suggested working with the office of assessment to provide higher level measures (email sent 9/24).
aeherget (Thu, 27 Sep 2018 13:55:21 GMT): AECHH: At the Sept. 26, 2018 UCCC meeting the members approved PS 335 with the friendly suggestion to clarify what "attend regularly" means in the participation portion of the syllabus.
despain (Thu, 27 Sep 2018 19:50:07 GMT): "Attend regularly" clarified in the syllabus to be "attend each class."
Key: 4592
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