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Viewing: PS 331 : U.S. Foreign Policy

Last approved: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:19:22 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 19 Apr 2016 14:00:38 GMT

Change Type
Major
PS (Political Science)
331
018098
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
U.S. Foreign Policy
U S Foreign Policy
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Political Science (16PS)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
William Boettcher, PhD
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PSBABA Political Science Elective
16PSAMBA Political Science: American Politics Elective
16PSINT BA Political Science: International Politics Elective
16PSLJJBA Political Science: Law and Justice, Justice Systems Elective
16PSLJL BA Political Science: Law and Justice, Law and Theory Elective
16PSPUBBA Political Science: Public Policy Elective
16PSBSBS Political Science Elective
16OSM Political Science Minor Elective
The content, formulation, and execution of U.S. foreign policy during the postwar period, with concentration on major issues and trends, the instruments for implementing foreign policy, and analysis of the policy-making process.

Formal GEP review and adding to CourseLeaf system and term offering


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Social Sciences
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Examine how human behavior, mental processes, organizational processes, and institutional processes shape United States foreign policy.
 
 
Mid-term and Final exams with short answer and essay questions related to the above. Sample Exam Question - Define partisanship and bipartisanship. Are the years from the 1940s to the 1960s best characterized as an era of partisanship or bipartisanship in foreign policy? Why? Were the eight years of the George W. Bush administration marked by partisanship or bipartisanship in foreign policy? Why? Should we expect partisan divisions over foreign policy to continue into the future? Why or why not?
 
 
Evaluate and apply social scientific methods to examine human behavior, mental processes, organizational processes, and institutional processes as related to US foreign policy.
 
 
Semester-long research paper on U.S. foreign policy toward a region (attached).
 
 
Critique, compare, and contrast theories from economics, psychology, political science, sociology that explain the underlying origins of real-world problems.
 
 
Students take five short in-class quizzes on the course readings and current topics in U.S. Foreign Policy. Mid-term and Final exams with short answer and essay questions related to the above. Sample questions:
For _______, values, rather than interests, are predominant in shaping foreign policy.
a.) anarchists
b.) idealists
c.) realists
d.) impressionists

President Carter highlighted the ________ as a guide to American foreign policy.
a.) notion of self-interest
b.) importance of domestic values
c.) theory of realism
d.) neglect of human rights
Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
There are no restrictions.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
American Foreign Policy & Process by James M. McCormick. Boston, MA: Wadsworth/Cengage, 2014 (sixth edition).

Rise to Globalism: American Foreign Policy Since 1938 by Stephen E. Ambrose and Douglas G. Brinkley. New York: Penguin Books, 2010 (ninth edition).

Foreign Policy Begins at Home: The Case for Putting America’s House in Order by Richard N. Haass. New York: Basic Books, 2013 (paperback edition).
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
no change
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
no change
Course is already a regular offering within the PS Department and will continue to be.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of U.S. foreign policy. The course examines many of the concepts, actors, roles, institutions, processes, and substantive issues that shape U.S. foreign relations. It begins with an historical overview of U.S. policy during the period following World War II, the Cold War, and the Post-Cold War era. Particular attention is paid to recurrent substantive themes as well as the development of the institutions (NSC, Defense Department, State Department, CIA, etc.) that are currently responsible for formulating America's foreign policy strategy. The latter half of the course focuses on the President, Congress, the Bureaucracy, the Political Parties, the Media, Interest Groups, and Public Opinion. This part of the course examines the dynamic and complex interactions between the various actors attempting to control or constrain U.S. foreign policy. The final portion of the course considers one example of a foreign policy strategy designed to respond to the "new realities" of the Post-9/11 world. The critique of this proposal should encourage students to creatively reflect on alternative paths for U.S. foreign policy in the twenty-first century.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1.  examine how human behavior, mental processes, organizational processes, and institutional processes shape United States foreign policy.

2. evaluate and apply social scientific methods to examine human behavior, mental processes, organizational processes, and institutional processes as related to US foreign policy.

3. critique, compare, and contrast theories from economics, psychology, political science, sociology that explain the underlying origins of real-world problems.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Other100no change
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
see attached weekly topics

shgreene (Tue, 09 Feb 2016 20:34:33 GMT): Rollback: I'm on a roll....back.
despain (Tue, 15 Mar 2016 14:46:39 GMT): Rollback: Adjust objectives and learning outcomes, etc.
shgreene (Tue, 15 Mar 2016 19:12:41 GMT): Rollback: Outcomes.
Key: 4610