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Viewing: PY 205 : Physics for Engineers and Scientists I

Last approved: Fri, 19 Feb 2016 20:51:07 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 19 Feb 2016 20:51:07 GMT

Change Type
PY (Physics)
205
018981
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Physics for Engineers and Scientists I
Physics Engr I
College of Sciences
Physics (17PY)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Summer 1 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Problem Session1.0
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Staff (all ranks)
various

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture1000150YesBased on previous enrollments.
Problem Session100030YesBased on previous enrollments.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
IND5050Non/a
Prerequisite: MA 141 with a grade of C- or better or MA 241PL. Credit is not allowed for both PY 205 and PY 201 or PY 211. Co-requisite: PY 206. ADD BOTH PY 205 and PY 206 TO YOUR SHOPPING CART AND THEN ENROLL SIMULTANEOUSLY
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
n/aSee appendedRequired
First semester of a two-semester sequence in introductory physics, with coordinated problem-solving experiences. A calculus-based study of mechanics, sound and heat. Credit not allowed for more than one of PY 205, PY 201, and PY 211.

This submission brings the courseleaf record up to date with the most recent (approved) course action for PY205. There are no revisions.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Natural Sciences
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
This objective is met by several course learning objectives, for example,
10.9 Define the torque in terms of the moment arm. Calculate the net torque on a body.
 
 
Student learning outcomes are measured in three tests and the final examination. A sample test question that measures outcome 10.9 is appended.
 
 
This objective is met by several course learning objectives, for example,
5.6 Use free body diagrams to set up Newton's second law for the motion of objects in various 1D and 2D problems. Solve the resulting equations algebraically.
 
 
Student learning outcomes are measured in three tests and the final examination. A sample question that measures outcome 5.6 is appended.
Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
n/a
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
MA 141 with a grade of C- or better or MA 241 Placement. Credit is not allowed for PY 205 and PY 201 or PY211.

PY205 and PY 206 must be in the shopping card simultaneously to enroll.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
n/a
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See course syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See course syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
See course syllabus.
See course syllabus.

As a student in this course, you can expect to:


(1) Acquire an overview of the general principles of physics, and how they apply to one- and two-dimensional motion, rotational motion, oscillations, waves, sound, fluids and heat; and


(2) Learn how to solve elementary physics problems systematically, logically, and quantitatively through the use of techniques based on algebra, trigonometry, calculus, and graphical methods.


Student Learning Outcomes

PY 205 Learning Objectives

The student shall demonstrate, through performance in homework assignments,

in-class assessments, tests and a final exam, the ability to do the following:




Measurement and Units

1.1 Describe the base SI units meter and kilogram and compare them to the common British units foot and pound.

1.2 Use various conversion factors.

1.3 Analyze the units and dimensions of equations (dimensional analysis); use units in numerical calculations.

1.4 Quote numerical results to the correct number of significant figures.




Kinematics in One Dimension

2.1 State and use the definitions of 1D position x, displacement, average velocity, and average acceleration.

2.2 State and use the definitions of 1D instantaneous velocity v and acceleration a.

2.3 Sketch graphs of v versus t and a versus t given a graph of x versus t.

2.4 Apply the equations developed for constant acceleration (as in Table 2-1) to solve 1D motion problems.

2.5 Apply constant acceleration equations to free fall problems.

2.6 Use differential calculus to develop consistent equations for x, v, and a in terms of t including initial conditions (e.g.,

derive v(t)and x(t) when a = constant).




Vectors and Vector Addition

3.1 Explain the difference between vectors and scalars, giving examples of each.

3.2 Describe how to add vectors graphically.

3.3 Sketch vector diagrams showing sums and differences A + B and A – B.


3.4 Use properties of a right triangle to compute simple cases A + B and A – B.


3.5 Use components to combine vectors not conforming to right triangle cases.

3.6 Be able to express vectors in two or three dimensions in terms of Cartesian unit vectors i, j, and k. Carry out sums and differences

of vectors in unit vector form.




Kinematics in Two Dimensions

4.1 State and use the definitions of 2D position, displacement, average velocity, average acceleration.

4.2 State and use the definitions of 2D instantaneous velocity and acceleration.

4.3 Use calculus to develop or check equations for displacement, velocity, and acceleration.

4.4 Solve projectile motion problems using constant acceleration equations in 2D.

4.5 Define centripetal acceleration; describe uniform circular motion; derive the relation between the magnitude of centripetal

acceleration aR and speed v.

4.6 Describe the motion of an object from the point of view of a moving observer.




Newton’s Laws of Motion

5.1 Give examples of the law of inertia (1st law).

5.2 Use F = ma (2nd law) in some simple cases.

5.3 Explain the difference between mass and weight; calculate weight from mass and mass from weight.

5.4 Give examples of force pairs (3rd law).

5.5 Draw free body diagrams for problems involving these forces: weight, normal force, and various applied forces.

5.6 Use free body diagrams to set up Newton’s second law for the motion of objects in various 1D and 2D problems. Solve the

resulting equation(s) algebraically.

5.7 Apply Newton's second law to determine the motion of a single body; derive symbolic expressions and evaluate them.

5.8 Apply Newton’s second law to determine the motion of coupled masses; derive symbolic expressions and evaluate them.




Additional Applications of Newton’s Laws

6.1 State and use the empirical laws of friction between ordinary surfaces for static and kinetic situations.

6.2 Apply Newton’s second law to determine the motion of a single body including friction; derive symbolic expressions and evaluate

them.

6.3 Apply Newton’s second law to determine the motion of coupled masses including friction; derive symbolic expressions and

evaluate them.

6.4 Define “terminal speed”.

6.5 Apply Newton’s second law to a particle undergoing uniform circular motion.

6.6 Treat nonuniform circular motion using radial and tangential components.




Gravitation

13.1 Explain the meaning of “Universal” as used in “Universal Law of Gravitation”.

use Newton’s law of gravitation to calculate the gravitational force between two point masses (particles).

13.2 Use Newton’s law of gravitation and the superposition principle to calculate the net gravitational force (direction as well as

magnitude) on one particle due to other particles.

13.3 Derive and evaluate the gravitational acceleration g on the surface of the earth or another planet given that the mass of the planet

is distributed with spherical symmetry.

13.4 Explain the difference between the Universal Gravitation Constant (G) and the local acceleration of gravity (g).

13.5 Explain the term “weightlessness” as applied to satellites in orbit about the earth. Determine the speed of such satellites in terms

of the radius of the orbit. Compare weightlessness in a satellite to weightlessness in a freely falling elevator.

13.6 Derive Kepler’s Third Law from the Law of Universal Gravitation.

13.7 Apply Kepler’s Third Law to planets and satellites.




Linear Momentum

9.1 Define the center of mass of a group of point particles; define the center of mass of an extended rigid body.

9.2 Determine the center of mass of various systems of particles; use symmetry when appropriate.

9.3 Define the linear momentum, p, of a particle.


9.4 Express Newton’s second law for a single particle in terms of momentum.

9.5 Determine the velocity of the center of mass of various systems of particles using its connection to the total linear momentum of

the system.

9.6 State the relation between the rate of change of the total linear momentum and the net external force on the system.

9.7 Define “impulse”; state the momentum-impulse theorem.

9.8 Apply the impulse-momentum theorem in various situations.

9.9 Show how conservation of linear momentum follows from Newton’s second law.

9.10 Apply conservation of linear momentum to various situations.




Scalar Product of Two Vectors

3.7 State the rectangular and polar forms of the scalar product.

3.8 Calculate the scalar product of two vectors given in unit-vector form.

3.9 Calculate the scalar product of two vectors given their magnitudes and orientations.




Work and Kinetic Energy

7.1 Define the work done by a constant force F in a displacement d; define the joule.

7.2 Evaluate work in objective 7.1 as a scalar (dot) product.

7.3 Define work done by a variable force in a 1D displacement as an area and as an integral; apply to a spring force, other xn type

forces, or a force defined graphically by an F versus x plot.

7.4 Define and calculate the kinetic energy of a particle.

7.5 State and use the work-energy principle applied to a particle.

7.6 Define average and instantaneous power; calculate power in various situations.




Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy

8.1 Explain the difference between work and potential energy.

8.2 Explain the difference between conservative and non-conservative forces.

8.3 Calculate the gravitational potential energy of a particle in various situations (i.e., both near and far from the surface of the Earth).

8.4 Calculate the elastic potential energy of a particle attached to a stretched spring.

8.5 Define the mechanical energy of a particle.

8.6 State the relationship between the work done on a particle and the change in its potential energy; use this relation to show that

conservation of mechanical energy follows from the work-energy theorem.

8.7 Apply conservation of mechanical energy in various situations.

8.7 Explain why a particle’s mechanical energy always decreases when friction does work on the particle; apply the generalized

work-energy principle when friction is present in various cases.




Rotational Motion About a Fixed Axis

10.1 Give examples of objects in rotation about a fixed axis.

10.2 Define angle in radians; convert between radians, revolutions, and degrees.

10.3 State and use definitions of angular displacement, average angular velocity, and average angular acceleration.

10.4 State and use definitions of instantaneous angular velocity and angular acceleration.

10.5 Solve various constant angular acceleration problems.

10.6 Associate angular variables with their 1D linear motion counterparts.

10.7 Calculate the tangential velocity and the radial acceleration of a point on a body in rotation about a fixed axis; sketch directions of

these vectors.

10.8 Describe the vector nature of angular velocity and angular acceleration.

10.9 Define torque in terms of the moment arm. Calculate the net torque on a body.

10.10 Apply Newton’s second law for rotation to various cases.

10.11 Define the moment of inertia I of a body about a fixed axis of rotation by treating the body as a collection of (point) particles.

10.12 Apply the definition of I to various cases; use the parallel axis theorem; see Fig. 10-2 for some special cases.

10.13 Calculate the kinetic energy of rotation for a body rotating about a fixed axis.




Vector Product of Two Vectors


3.10 state the rectangular and polar forms of the vector product

3.11 calculate the vector product of two vectors given in unit-vector form.

3.12 calculate the vector product of two vectors given their magnitudes and orientations.




Angular Momentum

11.1 Describe rolling without slipping from two frames. Use the relation between linear speed and angular velocity.

11.2 Calculate the kinetic energy of a wheel rolling without slipping. Find the speed of a hoop, disk, or sphere that rolls down an

incline plane without slipping. Which one reaches the bottom first?

11.3 Define: vector cross product.

11.4 Apply the vector cross product to torque.

11.5 Apply the vector cross product to angular momentum.

11.6 Calculate the angular momentum of a single particle about some axis; give both direction and magnitude.

11.7 Discuss the relation between rate of change of L and net external torque for a system of particles.

11.8 State the relation between the angular momentum L of a rigid body in rotation about a fixed axis and its angular velocity vector.

11.9 Use angular momentum L for rotation about a fixed axis to derive conservation of angular momentum. Apply conservation of

angular momentum to various cases. Describe the direction of the vector L.

11.10 State the general law of conservation of angular momentum and apply it to various problems.




Simple Harmonic Motion

15.1 Give examples of bodies executing oscillatory motion; define the terms “amplitude”, “period”, “frequency” and “phase

constant”.

15.2 Define simple harmonic motion (SHM) with reference to a mass on an ideal spring.

15.3 Show that Newton’s second law for 1D SHM of a particle on an ideal spring is solved by the sine or cosine functions; determine

the frequency and period in terms of the spring constant and mass; calculate frequency and period in various cases.

15.4 Given the position, x, as a function of time, determine the amplitude, frequency, angular frequency, period, and phase constant of

the SHM.

15.5 Given data about the particle at t = 0, determine the equation for position, x, as a function of time.

15.6 Apply conservation of mechanical energy to solve various SHM problems.

15.7 When is a pendulum’s motion equivalent to simple harmonic motion? Calculate the period and frequency of a simple pendulum.

Compare SHM and uniform circular motion.




Wave Motion, Transverse Waves

16.1 Give examples of waves; distinguish mechanical waves from radio (EM) waves and transverse waves from longitudinal waves.

16.2 Calculate the wave speed for the case of transverse waves on a stretched string.

16.3 Explain how the intensity of a point source varies with distance from it; how are plane waves related to spherical waves?

16.4 Describe the motion of a wave pulse on an infinite stretched string.

16.5 Write down the equation describing a sinusoidal traveling wave on an infinite stretched string; identify the direction of motion,

amplitude, frequency, period, and wavelength; calculate the wave speed from the frequency and wavelength.

16.7 Use the superposition principle to combine two overlapping waves and to explain reflection of a wave pulse from a fixed end of a

stretched string. Give examples of constructive and destructive interference.

16.8 Determine the allowed wavelengths and frequencies for standing waves on a stretched string with both ends fixed.




Longitudinal Waves and Sound


17.1 Contrast sound waves with waves on a stretched string; sketch sinusoidal sound waves in a pipe as if sound waves were

transverse; calculate sound wave speed from frequency and wavelength.

17.2 Calculate echo times for a pulse of sound; compare speeds in air (gas), water (liquid), and aluminum (solid).

17.3 Define sound level in decibels and compare sound levels from the same source at different distances from the source.

17.4 Calculate the allowed frequencies of standing sound waves in pipes open at one or at both ends.

17.5 Explain how are beats are produced; evaluate the beat frequency or use it to deduce individual frequencies.

17.6 Explain the Doppler effect.

17.7 Calculate the frequency heard by an observer when the source moves towards or away from the observer; repeat for the observer

in motion towards or away from the moving or stationary source.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Exam19n/a
Exam19n/a
Exam19n/a
Final Exam25n/a
Other9Problem session
Homework9n/a
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
see course syllabus

jbrown (Wed, 17 Feb 2016 20:43:27 GMT): Rollback: .
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