Viewing: REL 323 : Religious Cults, Sects, and Minority Faiths in America

Last approved: Thu, 09 Nov 2017 09:01:52 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 09 Nov 2017 09:01:52 GMT

Changes proposed by: n51ls801
Change Type
Major
REL (Religious Studies)
323
019242
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Religious Cults, Sects, and Minority Faiths in America
Relig Cults Sects in America
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
38.0201
Religion/Religious Studies.
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jason Bivins
Professor of Religious Studies

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture6060Nonone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
None.
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16RELSTBABA-Religious StudiesElective
Religious cults, sects and minority faiths in America, including Mormonism, Christian Science and Jehovah's Witnesses. Also covers such alternate groups as the holiness-charismatic movement and the Unification Church. Origins, development and teachings of these groups within the context of American culture and religion.

REL 323  is being changed from Fall Only to Spring Only to allow REL 320 to serve as a feeder course for it, REL 383, and REL 423 (also taught by Professor Bivins) with the intention of thereby attracting additional majors. The timing of REL 320 is being changed from the Spring to the Fall, its (modest) prerequisite is being eliminated (because Professor Bivins has found it to be unnecessary) and its enrollment cap will also be increased, initially to 60. Concomitantly REL 423's timing is being changed (removing the limitation to offering in Alternate Odd Years so that it may be offered more often; REL 423/REL523 are currently trapped in CIM and uneditable). No change in REL 383's timing is needed.


No change in REL 323's content is involved.


Enrollments for REL 323 have been as follows:


2016 Fall 43


2015 Fall 42


2014 Fall 48


2013 Fall 45


2012 Fall 45


2010 Fall 45


2007 Fall 44.


GEP HUM review auto-triggered


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will demonstrate a basic familiarity with the traditions comprising the history of alternative religions in the United States and the ways in which they have contributed to the development of its cultures.
 
 
Exam essay questions (Sample question: How did the Protestant attempt to limit the increasing influence of Catholic immigrant groups in the early 20thC by pressing for the development of the doctrine of separation of church and state also facilitate a burgeoning of alternative religions in the US?)
 
 
Students will be able reflectively to analyze the history of alternative religions in the United States and the comparative questions involved in the study thereof by developing historical and theoretical frameworks that highlight the functional similarities and differences in their social roles.
 
 
Paper topics (Sample topic: In religious studies there is often a counter-intuitive relationship between freedom and restrictions, as exemplified by Buddhism and some extreme cases of ascetic Christianity. This sense of restriction in order to attain true liberation is one that is central in many New Religious Movements. Develop this theme using the examples of Voodoo, the Nation of Islam and the Neopagan and new age movements that have come about in recent times.)
 
 
Students will be able to argue for the use of particular historical and theoretical frameworks facilitating analysis of the history of alternative religions in the United States, evaluating the frameworks' ability to highlight the functional similarities and differences in their social roles.
 
 
Paper topics (Sample paper topic: How do the religious communities of Wiccans, Santeria, and UFO Religious groups differ in their social functional roles? In what ways are they alike? What kinds of arguments does one need to give to identify the frameworks best suited to revealing such similarities and differences?)
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Students will acquire a basic familiarity with the traditions comprising the history of alternative religions in the United States and will develop a historical and theoretical framework for understanding that history and the comparative questions involved in the study thereof.
 
 
Paper topics (Sample topic: In 1993, after a thirty year legal battle with the IRS, many parts of the Church of Scientology were granted tax exempt status as religious charities. At Michigan Technical University in 2007, students who posted a threatening message on the door of the student union space used by a campus Pastafarian chapter [Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster] were judged guilty of bias-related religious harassment. Explore the ways in which the legal system responds differentially to social pressure exerted by diverse religious groups by detailing the relevant differences between Scientology and Pastafarianism. Do they both constitute “invented religions”?)
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
Students will learn to think, write, and reason theoretically and analytically about the themes and issues emerging from the historical consideration of alternative religions in the United States by examining the dissonances and mutual influences between alternative religions.
 
 
Exam essay questions (Sample question: Why was Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s self-identification as a member of the Church of Latter Day Saints raised as an issue by some Christian clergy who share many of Romney’s political views? Were these clergy justified in labeling the Church of Latter Day Saints as the “cult of Mormons”?)
Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
na
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
na
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
See syllabus
part of instructor's standard load as noted

=GEP-HUM and GEP-USD objectives


Student Learning Outcomes

(HUM learning outcomes)

1. Students will demonstrate basic knowledge of the traditions comprising the history of alternative religions in the United States and the ways in which they have contributed to the development of its cultures.

2. Students will be able reflectively to analyze the history of alternative religions in the United States and the comparative questions involved in the study thereof by developing historical and theoretical frameworks that highlight the functional similarities and differences in their social roles.

3. Students will be able to argue for the use of particular historical and theoretical frameworks facilitating analysis of the history of alternative religions in the United States, evaluating the frameworks' ability to highlight the functional similarities and differences in their social roles.




(USD Learning outcomes approved in 2012)

1. Students will acquire a basic familiarity with the traditions comprising the history of alternative religions in the United States and will develop a historical and theoretical framework for understanding that history and the comparative questions involved in the study thereof.

4. Students will learn to think, write, and reason theoretically and analytically about the themes and issues emerging from the historical consideration of alternative religions in the United States by examining the dissonances and mutual influences between alternative religions.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation10%see syllabus
Readings assignments10%1-2 page critical response to the week's readings
Exam25% eachTake-home essay questions
Written Assignment15% each5-7 page analytical papers
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
see syllabus16 wkssee syllabus

lamarcus (Tue, 24 Oct 2017 13:48:06 GMT): Added evaluation methods per syllabus
Key: 4851
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