Preview Workflow

Viewing: REL 423 / REL 523 : Religion and Politics in America

Last approved: Wed, 07 Mar 2018 16:01:50 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 07 Mar 2018 16:01:46 GMT

Change Type
Major
REL (Religious Studies)
423
019267
Dual-Level Course
Yes
523
Cross-listed Course
No
Religion and Politics in America
Religion Politics in America
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Upon Demand
Spring 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jason Bivins
Professor of Religious Studies
assoc

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture55NoREL 423 typically enrolls about 30 undergraduates. It is expected that about 5 graduate students would enroll in REL 523.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite for REL 423: one 300-level course in religion, philosophy, or history
Prerequisite for REL 523: graduate standing
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16RELSTBAReligious Studies-BAElective
Issues and problems in religion and politics in the United States since 1900. Historical, theoretical, sociological, and cultural approaches to religion and politics. Inquiry into the relations between religion and the state. Responses of religious traditions to American social and political issues. Students cannot receive credit for both REL 423 and REL 523.

REL 523 is expected to meet graduate curricular needs in the following disciplines: Communications, History, Political Science, and Sociology.


Past enrollments in REL 423:

2015 Spring Term 29

2014 Spring Term 34

2012 Fall Term 11

2012 Spring Term 22

2008 Fall Term 28


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will develop a historical and theoretical framework for understanding the religions and politics as constitutive of the culture(s) of the United States and the comparative questions involved in the study thereof.
 
 
Paper topics and exam questions. (Ex. Daniel Bell writes, “… it seems obvious that communitarian critics of liberalism may have been motivated not so much by philosophical concerns as by certain pressing political concerns, namely, the negative social and psychological effects related to the atomistic tendencies of modern liberal societies.” Explain briefly which communitarian concerns Bell proposes to re-classify as political as opposed to philosophical.)
 
 
Students will demonstrate understanding of the traditions comprising the history of religions and politics in the United States and will inter alia develop an awareness that interpretation is itself a critical form of knowing in religious studies (and thus in the humanities).
 
 
Paper topics and exam questions. (Ex. US political discourse has often devolved into demonization of political opponents, according to Morone. Give two examples from a recent political campaign not considered by Morone and then explain how it was politically advantageous to the accuser to invoke “demonology.”)
 
 
Student will develop their abilities to think, write, and reason theoretically and analytically about the themes and issues emerging from the historical consideration of the mutual influences between religions and politics in the United States.
 
 
Paper topics and exam questions. (Ex. The Home School Legal Defense Association “believes that nearly all of the federal government’s spending on education is unconstitutional and must be eliminated.” Relying on SCOTUS case law discussed in this course, outline an argument either for or against this HSLDA position.)
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Students will analyze some of the ways in which religious identities are shaped by US cultural and social forces; and demonstrate understanding of the traditions comprising this history
 
 
Paper topics and exam questions. (Ex. Explore the dynamics of US political polarization driven by disparities and disagreements concerning the purpose of religion in daily life. How do the convictions symbolized by Answers in Genesis’ Creation Museum in Ohio with its saddle-wearing brontosaurus model provoke Charles P. Pierce to exclaim, “The rise of Idiot America is essentially a war on expertise.” How can the construction of the Creation Museum be seen as a reaction to what its members see as cultural threats to their identities?)
 
 
Students will learn to think, write, and reason theoretically and analytically about the themes and issues emerging from these historical considerations.
 
 
Paper topics and exam questions. (Ex. Compare and contrast three separate religious traditions [for example, Judaism, Catholicism, and Islam] concerning prevailing conceptions of race, gender, and economic well-being in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. What changes can we detect in theological or exegetical argumentation, in public activism, and in the relation between religious and more broadly civic identities as these traditions reflect on the realities of diversity and inequality in public life?
 
 

 
 

 
 
Students will describe and investigate ways in which people from different religious groups influence one another’s religious views.
 
 
Paper topics and exam questions. (Ex. Compare and contrast the influence of the establishment of the Church of England on the Founding Fathers with the influence of the Texas Board of Education’s efforts to re-establish Christianity on so-called “activist” judges in contemporary US courts. How are the religious identities of the judges implicated?)
Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
NA
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Prerequisite for REL 423: one 300-level course in religion, philosophy, or history
Prerequisite for REL 523: graduate standing
Students cannot receive credit for both REL 423 and REL 523.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
NA
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See attached syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
See attached syllabus
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesElizabeth CraigCommunication. Would REL 523 as described in the attached syllabus be of interest to any of your graduate students?
This does look like something our students might find interesting.
College of Humanities and Social SciencesSusanna LeeHistory. Would REL 523 as described in the attached syllabus be of interest to any of your graduate students?
We do occasionally have graduate students who are interested in religious history.
College of Humanities and Social SciencesMichael StruettPolitical Science. Would REL 523 as described in the attached syllabus be of interest to any of your graduate students?
I suspect that there would be only very limited interest on the part o MIS students in Rel 523.
College of Humanities and Social SciencesTroy CaseAnthropology. Would REL 523 as described in the attached syllabus be of interest to any of your graduate students?
You would likely get no more than one student from anthropology each time it is taught.
No new resources are required for offering REL 523 as it will be taught concurrently ("piggy-backed") with the already approved REL 423 and enrollments will be not be so large as to impose an excessive burden on the instructor.

See attached syllabus


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1. develop a historical and theoretical framework for understanding the religions and politics as constitutive of the culture(s) of the United States and the comparative questions involved in the study thereof.

2. demonstrate understanding of the traditions comprising the history of religions and politics in the United States and will inter alia develop an awareness that interpretation is itself a critical form of knowing in religious studies (and thus in the humanities).

3. develop their abilities to think, write, and reason theoretically and analytically about the themes and issues emerging from the historical consideration of the mutual influences between religions and politics in the United States.

4. analyze some of the ways in which religious identities are shaped by US cultural and social forces; and describe the traditions comprising this history;

5. describe and investigate ways in which people from different religious groups influence one another's religious views.

In addition to the above outcomes, REL 523, students will be able to:

6. develop a historical and theoretical framework for understanding the history of religions and politics in the United States and the comparative questions involved in the study thereof and delineate the traditions comprising this history;

7. think, write, and reason theoretically and analytically about the themes and issues emerging from these historical considerations; and

8. identify and describe relevant scholarly traditions shaping this field of inquiry.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation10%You must show up to class well-prepared and ready to participate and listen well. You are allowed 2 “free” absences; thereafter, absences count against your grade. See attached syllabus
Written Assignment10%Weekly Reading Responses
Midterm20%Take-home
Major Paper35%Final Research Paper (30-35 pp):
Written Assignment10%Journal-appropriate book review
Other---See attached syllabus for REL 423 student evaluation methods.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Orientations1 weekSee attached syllabus
Constitutions and Legacies2 weeksSee attached syllabus
The State, Legal Authority, Patriotism & Dissent2 weeksSee attached syllabus
The Body3 weeksSee attached syllabus
Home and the World5 weeksSee attached syllabus
Discourse2 weeksSee attached syllabus
mlnosbis 4/18/2016: No overlapping courses. This action is adding the graduate component. No consultation is required.

ghodge 4/18/2016 Edit student learning outcomes. "Familiar" is not measurable and observable; send handout to department. RESOLVED

ABGS Reviewer Comments:
-I see some attempt made to differentiate between 400 and 500 level offerings (additional learning outcomes and a slightly different allocation of credit for different course components).
-I did notice that the numbers in the undergrad table at the top of pg 3 on the syllabus come to 110% (the numbers on page 4 for the grad course do add to 100%).
-One required component of the grad syllabus [the required text under bullet point 14 on the grad syllabus checklist] appeared to be missing.

8/12/2016: Syllabus updated.
Key: 4854