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Viewing: REL 472 / REL 572 / WGS 472 / WGS 572 : Women and Religion

Last approved: Wed, 07 Mar 2018 16:03:49 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 07 Mar 2018 16:02:27 GMT

Change Type
Major
REL (Religious Studies)
472
019270
Dual-Level Course
Yes
572
Cross-listed Course
Yes
Course Prefix:
WGS
Women and Religion
Women & Religion
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Alternate Odd Years
Spring 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Mary Kathleen Cunningham
Associate Professor of Religious Studies
assoc

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture55NoREL 472 enrolls about 33 students; it is expected that REL 572 will enroll about 5.
Lecture3333NoREL 472 enrolls about 33 students; it is expected that REL 572 will enroll about 5.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: one course in religious studies or women's and gender studies
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16RELSTBAReligious Studies-BA Elective
16WGSBAWomen's and Gender Studies-BA Elective
Historical, literary, and theological sources dealing with portrayals of women and women's religious experience in several religious traditions of the world through different historical periods, from ancient to modern. Impact of feminist theory on the academic study of religion; methodological issues surrounding the study of women's religious history; role of religion in shaping attitudes toward women and their status in society. Students cannot receive credit for both REL/WGS 472 and REL/WGS 572.

REL/WGS 572 will contribute to contemporary interdisciplinary discussion about attitudes toward women and their status in society by exploring the role that religion plays in helping to shape these attitudes.  By examining historical, literary, and theological sources dealing with gender and portrayals of women and women’s religious experience in several of the world’s religious traditions, through different historical periods, from ancient to modern, it addresses University goals of internationalizing the campus and enhancing understanding of diverse populations.  The course also considers the impact of feminist theory on the academic study of religion and explores methodological issues surrounding the study of women’s religious history.  Students are provided with the guidance to develop the ability to think and write critically about the relationship between religion and society in fashioning views of women and gender as well as to evaluate proposals that aim to reclaim women’s history, reread classical religious texts, and offer new characterizations of sacred realities.


Possible Contributions to Graduate Interdisciplinary Teaching:


SPIA:  Masters of International Studies, Graduate Minor in International Studies


History MA and Public History MA/PhD—concentration in Religion and Public Life


MALS


Past enrollment in REL/WGS 472:


2015 Spring 28


2013 Spring 36


2011 Spring Term 33


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Analyze historical, literary, and theological sources dealing with gender and portrayals of women and women’s religious experience in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam through different historical periods, from ancient to modern.
Describe and interpret the role that religion has played and continues to play in shaping attitudes toward women and their status in society.
 
 
Assessment: Short writing assignments and examination questions.
Sample measure: Discuss the textual evidence provided by Meyers for her assertion that the linking of Eve with sin and suffering in traditional interpretations of Genesis 3 is a distortion that obliterates other important features of the story and summarize her methodology and argument concerning Genesis 3:16.
Sample measure: Discuss Ahmed’s contention that there exist within Islam two distinct voices and two competing understandings of gender, one expressed in the pragmatic regulations for society, the other in the articulation of an ethical vision. In your answer, examine her treatment of the development of core Islamic discourses on women and gender in light of the historical contexts that helped shape these discourses and her view that this history is one of gradual deterioration in the status and rights of women. What suggestions does she offer for achieving a reading of Islam that she feels is fairer to women?
 
 
Describe the impact of feminist theory on the academic study of religion and the methodological issues surrounding the study of women’s religious history.
Analyze and apply diverse methods of interpreting classical religious texts.
 
 
Assessment: Short writing assignments and examination questions.
Sample measure: Describe and evaluate Trible’s methodology and interpretation of two of the texts of terror that she examines. Be sure to address the issue of the relationship that she sees among writer, text, and reader as well as her commitment to the methodology of literary criticism and the perspective of feminism. How successful is her proposal as both a piece of feminist scholarship dedicated to studying women thoroughly and completely and as biblical interpretation (coherent/consistent, comprehensible, illuminating for our time)? Give reasons for your assessment.
Sample measure: Compare and contrast the Pauline pronouncements on sexuality and gender in I Corinthians 7, 11, and 14 with the views in Colossians 3, Ephesians 5, I Timothy 2 and 5, and I Peter 2-3. Discuss how the commentators in Women’s Bible Commentary and Women and Christian Origins interpret the similarities and/or differences in these letters.
 
 
Analyze and evaluate diversified religious proposals.
 
 
Assessment: Short writing assignments and examination questions.
Sample measure: Discuss McFague’s proposal for experimenting with the model of God as mother. Why does she feel that we should use female as well as male metaphors of God? What does she mean by saying that God should be imagined in female, not feminine, terms? Briefly describe how McFague characterizes the love, activity, and ethic of God as mother. What does this kind of love say about existence in our world? What are the strengths and weaknesses of McFague’s proposal? Do you agree with her that this model is an “illuminating expression of an inclusive Christian vision of fulfillment appropriate to a holistic, nuclear age?” Why or why not?
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
NA
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Prerequisite for REL 472: one course in religious studies or women's and gender studies
Prerequisite for REL 572: graduate standing
Students cannot receive credit for both REL/WGS 472 and REL/WGS 572.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
NA
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
See attached syllabus.
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesMichael StruettWould REL 572 as described in the attached syllabus be of interest to students in the Masters of International Studies and the Graduate Minor in International Studies?
--Rel 572, might be of interest to as many as 1 or 2 MIS students per cohort.
College of Humanities and Social SciencesSusanna LeeWould REL 572 as described in the attached syllabus be of interest to students in the History MA and the Public History MA/PhD—concentration in Religion and Public Life?
--We do occasionally have graduate students who are interested in religious history.
College of Humanities and Social SciencesMichael GarvalWould REL 572 as described in the attached syllabus be of interest to students in the MALS program?
--The course would likely be of interest to certain MALS students, depending upon its appropriateness to their
self-designed concentration.
College of Humanities and Social SciencesKarey HarwoodDoes WGS have any objection to adding REL/WGS 572 as described?
--We have no objections to the proposal for a piggy-backed REL/WGS 472/572 and are, in fact, happy to
support it.
This new course does not require additional resources of faculty, facilities, or equipment. The additional graduate enrollment is expected to be modest and can be handled as part of the standard load.

See attached syllabus.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able to


1. analyze historical, literary, and theological sources dealing with gender and portrayals of women and women’s religious experience in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam through different historical periods, from ancient to modern.


2. describe and interpret the role that religion has played and continues to play in shaping attitudes toward women and their status in society.


3. describe the impact of feminist theory on the academic study of religion and the methodological issues surrounding the study of women’s religious history.


4. analyze and apply diverse methods of interpreting classical religious texts.


5. analyze and evaluate diversified religious proposals.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Written Assignment5%See attached syllabus for undergrad and graduate expectations.
Participation5%See attached syllabus for undergrad and graduate expectations.
Multiple exams90%Three take-home essay exams. See attached syllabus for undergrad and graduate expectations.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction and Methodology Academic Study of Religion and Women’s and Gender Studies1 weekSee attached syllabus.
Women and Judaism - Introduction1 weekSee attached syllabus.
Rereading Classical Religious Texts: Women in the Hebrew Bible1 weekSee attached syllabus.
Law and Social Setting1 weekSee attached syllabus.
Women in Narrative: Troubling Texts 1.5 weeksSee attached syllabus.
Further Images of Women in the Hebrew Bible1 weekSee attached syllabus.
Feminist Judaic Theology: Naming the Sacred1 weekSee attached syllabus.
Women and Christianity - Introduction1 weekSee attached syllabus.
Women in the New Testament: Women in the Gospel Narratives1 weekSee attached syllabus.
Women in the New Testament: Women in the Pauline and Related Texts1.5 weeksSee attached syllabus.
Feminist Christian Theology: Naming the Sacred1 weekSee attached syllabus.
Women and Islam: Reclaiming Women’s History1.5 weeksSee attached syllabus.
Rereading Classical Religious Texts: Women in the Qur’an1.5 weeksSee attached syllabus.
In order to expedite processing of the addition of REL/WGS 572, the department head has given approval of REL/WGS 472 for GEP review.

mlnosbis 5/2/2016: No overlapping courses. See consultation notes above.

ghodge 5/2/2016 Ready for ABGS reviewers

ABGS Reviewer Comments:
-Seems to have a longer number of meeting hours for graduate students. Not sure this aligns with the Carnegie credit requirement. Should the 3 additional meetings be clarified and not identified as part of the course meeting times?
-Effective date should change since Spring 2016 has passed. Spring 2017?

ghodge 8/15/2016 Comment: Three additional meetings at arranged times is described in the syllabus, but would not generally be enough for another credit hour. Grad school will update the effective date.
Key: 4857