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Viewing: REL 413 / REL 513 : The Life and Letters of the Apostle Paul

Last approved: Wed, 07 Mar 2018 16:01:12 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 07 Mar 2018 16:01:08 GMT

Change Type
Major
REL (Religious Studies)
413
019266
Dual-Level Course
Yes
513
Cross-listed Course
No
The Life and Letters of the Apostle Paul
Apostle Paul
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Alternate Odd Years
Spring 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
William Adler
Distinguished University Professor of Religious Studies
assoc

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture2525No25 per section, one section per semester
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: REL 312 or REL 317
Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Intensive study of the apostle Paul and his writings in their historical, literary and religious contexts. Sources for the life and ministry of Paul; the structure and theology of the Pauline and deutero-Pauline epistles; the influence and image of Paul in early Christianity; and contemporary controversies and issues in the study of Paul. Students may not receive credit for both REL 413 and REL 513.

An external review (Fall 2015) recommended increased offerings as permitted by existing resources for graduate students by creation of small "piggy back" versions of existing 400-level courses. In a post-review meeting with the Provost and Senior Vice Provost, the recommendation was favorably received. As the department had already agreed with the Dean of H&SS to increase its offerings to graduate students, having already proposed on 9/30/2015, four new 500-level "piggy back" versions of existing 400-level courses, it welcomed the recommendation to continue.


Given that the enrollment history is as indicated below, the addition of five graduate students would not impose an unmanageable added burden on the instructor:



  • F2015 20

  • F2013 14

  • Sp2012 19

  • F2010 20

  • F2008 20.


Undergraduate grading:



  • 5%       Attendance

  • 15%     Class participation

  • 30%     Small writing assignments weekly @ 3 pp

  • 40%     Research paper 15-20 pp

  • 10%     Presentation of research paper


TOTAL: 100%


Graduate grading:



  • 5%       Attendance

  • 15%     Class participation

  • 25%     Small writing assignments weekly @ 5 pp

  • 45%     Research paper 25-30 pp

  • 10%     Presentation of research paper


TOTAL: 100%.


[Last reviewed for GEP 8.2012]


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will analyze the person and writings of the apostle Paul in the context of Judaism and Greco-Roman culture in the first century, with a special emphasis on the experience of diaspora Jews living in a Hellenistic environment.
 
 
Short papers (3-5 pages) on Paul’s interactions with Judaism, Greco-Roman culture, and the Roman state. (Ex. What is “grace” (charis) in the context of the Graeco-Roman world and how does Paul employ this concept in his proclamation of the gospel of Jesus?)
 
 
Students will demonstrate a working knowledge of modern trends and approaches to the study of Paul’s epistles, including the formal structure and composition of Paul’s letter in comparison with the conventions of ancient epistolography; criteria of authenticity; readership and reception.
 
 
Short papers (3-5 pages) on the structure of one of Paul’s letters, and on the authenticity of letters of disputed authorship. (Ex. Badiou argues that Paul provided the foundation for modern philosophical universalism. What does he mean by this? What are some of the potential problems with this argument given a thoroughly historical-critical reading of Paul’s letters?)
 
 
Students will apply skills in developing critically informed and supported arguments about Paul’s life and letters and his influence on the development of Christianity.
 
 
A final research paper on a topic of the student’s choosing. (Ex. Based on the evidence from his letters, what was Paul’s view of slavery? How has Paul’s perspective on slavery been employed in more modern discussions of slavery and human rights?)
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Students will analyze how Paul’s epistles were read and interpreted in differing social and cultural contexts, for examples, Jewish Christianity, the church fathers, the and the Protestant reformers.
 
 
Short papers (3-5 pages) on Marcion, Augustine and Luther’s interpretation of central Pauline concepts. (Ex. Compare and contrast Marcion's, Augustine's and Luther’s interpretations of central Pauline concepts.)
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
Students will examine how the interpretation of Paul evolved in the context of developments and changes in the church.
 
 
Short paper analyzing on cultural assumptions influencing the history of the interpretation of Paul. (Ex. Present an analysis of cultural assumptions influencing the history of the interpretation of Paul relying on Krister Stendahl, “Paul and the Introspective Conscience of the West.”)
US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
NA
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
For REL 413: Prerequisite: REL 312 or REL 317
For REL 513: Graduate standing.
Students may not receive credit for both REL 413 and REL 513.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
NA
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Longenecker Bruce W., and Todd D. Still, Thinking through Paul A Survey of His Life, Letters, and Theology (Zondervan, 2014). New: $44.95; Used: $33.75.
Meeks, W. A., ed., The writings of St. Paul (New York: Norton, 2007) (= Meeks [a]) New: $25.00; Used $16.90.

Additional readings on e-reserve or at the URLs given in the syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
This course examines the epistles of the apostle Paul in their historical and religious contexts. Among the topics treated in the class are:
1) the "historical" Paul, to the extent that this can be constructed from the available sources.
2) the structure and theology of the Pauline and deutero-Pauline epistles.
3) the influence and image of Paul in early Christianity.
4) contemporary controversies and issues in the study of Paul.
See syllabus for additional detail.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
NA
Professor Adler will continue to teach this course as part of his standard load. The addition of five graduate students would not impose an unmanageable added burden on the instructor.

  1. To acquire familiarity with  the epistles of the apostle Paul in their historical and religious contexts.

  2. To reconstruct the "historical" Paul, to the extent possible.

  3. To achieve an accurate view of the structure and theology of the Pauline and deutero-Pauline epistles.

  4. To develop an analytical appreciation of the influence and image of Paul in early Christianity and in contemporary studies of Paul.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:



  1. describe the contents of the Pauline and deutero-Pauline epistles, and the literary and historical contexts of the composition and collection of these texts;

  2. compare and contrast Paul’s writings with other early Christian texts;

  3. explain the influence of Paul’s ministry and writings on the development of Christianity;

  4. analyze and critique various approaches to the study of the epistles;

  5. identify and evaluate modern issues and problems in the study of Paul’s life and letters;

  6. form critically informed and supported arguments about Paul’s life and letters and his influence on the development of Christianity.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation15 / 15See syllabus for detail.
Short Paper30 / 25See syllabus: undergraduate @ 3 pp/ graduate at 5 pp
presentation10 / 10Presentation of research paper
Major Paper40 / 45See syllabus: undergraduate @ 15-20 pp/ graduate at 25-30 pp
Attendance5 / 5See syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
I. The Historical Paul7 wkssee syllabus
II. Pauline Christianity and its Influence4 wkssee syllabus
III. Modern Issues in the Study of Paul4 wkssee syllabus
mlnosbis 9/6/2017:
1) Effective date must be Spring 2018; it is too late for Fall 2017
2) Adequate distinction between undergraduate and graduate requirements
3) Will this course be capped at 5 graduate students, or is that just the expected enrollment?
4) What is the previous enrollment for the past few offerings of this course?

From W. Adler. Here are my responses:
For 1. - OK. [Added by n51ls801, 9/14/2017: The action was initially submitted on 3/22/2017, so it was not unreasonable to hope for an earlier disposition.] OK, MLN
For 2. - The differences in the ways course assignments are weighted in determining course grades for undergraduate and graduate levels are explained under "Justification." and under "Student Evaluation Methods," as well as in the syllabus. Is anything else needed? OK, MLN
For 3. - 5 is the maximum it's reasonable to expect, but not a cap. A cap can be considered later if enrollment pressure warrants it. OK, MLN
For 4. - The most recent enrollments are already given under "Justification." Is anything else needed? OK, MLN.

Added by n51ls801, 9/14/2017: Course goals copied and pasted on page 5 of syllabus.

ABGS Reviewer Comments:
-No concerns.
Key: 4860