Viewing: REL 327 : Issues in Contemporary Religion

Last approved: Wed, 31 Oct 2018 08:01:09 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 05 Sep 2018 18:40:44 GMT

Changes proposed by: n51ls801
Change Type
Major
REL (Religious Studies)
327
019247
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Issues in Contemporary Religion
Issues Contemporary Religion
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
38.0201
Religion/Religious Studies.
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Alternate Even Years
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Mary Kathleen Cunningham
Associate Professor of Religious Studies

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture4040NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16RELSTBAB. A. in Religious StudiesElective
16RSMMinor in Religious StudiesElective
Responses of contemporary Western religious thinkers to critics of religion and to challenges posed by the 20th century including the Nazi Holocaust, social injustice (liberation theologies - black, feminist, Third World), ecological crisis, threat of nuclear warfare, and conflicts between religions.

No revisions. GEP-Humanities review required


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to describe and interpret contemporary developments in Jewish and Christian religious thought, and will be able to explain the interaction of religion and culture in the 20th-21st centuries, with attention to both the impact of recent historical and cultural developments on the formulation of theological proposals and the role that religion has played in shaping societal attitudes and mores.
 
 
Short writing assignments and examination questions. (Ex. 1 Compare and contrast the thinking of Rubenstein and Fackenheim on believing in God after the Nazi Holocaust/Shoah. Take note of any differences that you see between the early and later thinking of these individuals. Ex. 2 Lynn White has claimed that the Judeo-Christian tradition bears “a huge burden of guilt” for our contemporary ecological crisis, because a particular reading of Genesis 1:26ff. has fostered an exploitative attitude toward nature. Discuss and evaluate White’s argument and the response of Peacocke to White’s thesis. What is the status of the dispute between White and Peacocke in light of White’s response to his critics?)
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to analyze and apply the various methodologies and research strategies and techniques that undergird the academic study of religion.
 
 
Short writing assignments and examination questions. (Ex. Compare and contrast dominion, stewardship, and community of creation paradigms of the human relationship to the natural world. Discuss and evaluate Johnson’s claim that the community of creation model will best promote the long-term goal of “a socially just and environmentally sustainable society in which the needs of all people are met and diverse species can prosper.”)
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to analyze and evaluate diversified religious proposals and the arguments pertaining to them.
 
 
Short writing assignments and examination questions. (Ex. Discuss McFague’s proposal for experimenting with the model of God as mother. Why does she feel that we should use female as well as male metaphors of God? Briefly describe how McFague characterizes the love, activity, and ethic of God as mother. What does this kind of love say about existence in our world? What are the strengths and weaknesses of McFague’s proposal?)
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Students will be able to describe and interpret contemporary developments in Jewish and Christian religious thought and to explain the interaction of religion and a variety of cultures in the 20th and 21st centuries, with attention to both the effects of recent historical and cultural developments on the formulation of theological proposals and the role that religion has played in shaping societal attitudes and mores.
 
 
Take home exam essays (Sample question: Latin American Liberation Theology: Discuss Peruvian theologian Gustavo Gutierrez's interpretation of sin, salvation, God and Jesus Christ. What relationship does he see between faith and works, theology and the practice of political justice for the desperately poor? To which biblical themes does he appeal in fashioning his proposal, and how does he use these resources? What does he mean when he says that his reading of the Bible is a militant reading?)
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
Students will be able to analyze and evaluate Jewish and Christian theological arguments that developed in Europe in response to the Holocaust.
 
 
Take home exam essays (Sample question: German Jew and Holocaust survivor Rabbi Emil Fackenheim sought to extend the traditional list of 613 Old Testament commandments in response to the "calamity." Contrast his response to that of radical Jewish theologian Rabbi Richard Rubenstein who writes of "the death of God" in the aftermath of Auschwitz.)
US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
na
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
na
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
McFague, Sallie. Models of God: Theology for an Ecological, Nuclear Age. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1987. ($20 new)
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
none
This course is part of Professor Cunningham's standard load.

GEP suffices


Student Learning Outcomes

GEP suffices


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Written Assignment5short writing assignments; see syllabus
Participation5See syllabus
Multiple exams602 @ 30; see syllabus
Final Exam30See syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction 1 wkSee syllabus
The Nature of Religious Language and the Task of Theology1.5 wksSee syllabus
The Nazi Holocaust/Shoah 3.5 wksSee syllabus
Ecological Theology5 wksSee syllabus
Liberation Theology 4 wksSee syllabus
GER>GEP Providing last approved information
Last approved syllabus 1990
GEP category of Global Knowledge- 2013 (document attached as additional documentation)

CIM notes:
16 weeks added as course length based on university standards
GEP attribute indicated in CIM
Course objectives added from last approved syllabus
GEP Global Knowledge outcomes and measures added from GEP document (attached)
Course delivery needed in CIM
Student Learning Outcomes needed in CIM
Grading/evaluation methods needed in CIM
GEP Humanities outcomes and measures needed in CIM

Syllabus notes (review of last approved syllabus):
Syllabus Review based on the Syllabus Regulations page: https://policies.ncsu.edu/regulation/reg-02-20-07/

The following statements, which can be found at the above link, should be added to the syllabus:
Integrity statement
Students with Disabilities statement
Electronic Components statement
Policies, Rules, and Regulations (PRRs) statement.

Please edit the syllabus to include the following:
Instructor information
Course info (credit hours, semester, etc.)
Requisites (indicate if there are none)
Student learning outcomes that are measurable
GEP category, measures, and outcomes (global knowledge and humanities)
Any course expenses including text books
Catalog description matching that in CIM
Any additional components such as labs
Projected schedule based on a 16 week semester
Safety and Risk statement (if there are no risks, indicate this with a statement)
Grading methods and scale
Late work policy per instructor
Attendance policy including excused absence criteria and number of acceptable absences along with any academic penalties

RLB 07/09/2018
Key: 4861
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