Viewing: REL 332 : The Buddhist Traditions

Last approved: Sat, 17 Nov 2018 09:01:14 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 18 Oct 2018 22:21:39 GMT

Changes proposed by: n51ls801
Change Type
Major
REL (Religious Studies)
332
019251
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
The Buddhist Traditions
The Buddhist Traditions
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religious Studies (16PHI)
38.0201
Religion/Religious Studies.
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Odd Years
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Levi McLaughlin
Associate Professor of Religious Studies

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture4545NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16RELSTBAB. A. in Religious StudiesElective
16RSMMinor in Religious StudiesElective
History and structure of the Buddhist tradition analyzed through the "three jewels": the Buddha, the Monastic Community (sangha), and the Teachings (dharma). Emphasis on fundamental religio-philosophical concepts, social history and ritual practices of Southern Buddhism, early Mahayana development, and Tantric ideals. Growth of the traditions in China and Japan.

No revisions. GEP-HUM review required.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Construct a historical and theoretical framework for analysis of the religious, political, and social contexts of Buddhist traditions and for developing comparative questions that emerge within this analytical framework.
 
 
Take-home examinations, quizzes, and weekly writing exercises. (Ex. There are some Buddhist traditions in which the emphasis on compassion and non-violence is weaker. Do participants in diverse Buddhist traditions experience the world in different ways that allegedly justify this difference in attitudes and behavior, or do they interpret shared experience in different ways? How should one determine that one of these explanations is more nearly correct?)
 
 
Describe basic Buddhist traditions and explain how definitions of these practices, doctrines, and traditions as “religion” have informed understandings of this category and its genealogy.
 
 
Take-home examinations, quizzes, and weekly writing exercises. (Ex. Although the practice of meditation is central to some North American understandings of Buddhism, most Buddhists elsewhere do not practice meditation and do not regard the practice as central to Buddhism though they might expect monks to meditate. What kind of criteria should be used in determining whether a practice of meditation is, or is not, central to Buddhism?)
 
 
Critically analyze and expand upon theoretical concepts and arguments found in both primary and secondary texts, both orally and in writing.
 
 
Take-home examinations, quizzes, and weekly writing exercises. (Ex. The oldest Buddhist scriptures are replete with rigorous arguments offered to justify not only abstract epistemological and metaphysical conclusions but various concrete, daily practices. Discuss one such argument and explain how it exemplifies dialectical best practices.)
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Identify key aspects of Buddhism and explain ways in which it shapes—and is shaped by—social and political environments.
 
 
Response papers, short essays and exam questions. (Ex. Explain the way the “dharmic religion” of Buddhism understands the nature of human existence, the soul, and the fundamental plight from which humanity needs to escape.)
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Synthesize and compare distinguishing characteristics of Buddhism.
 
 
Response papers, short essays and exam questions. (Ex. In exploring the conversation between Buddhism and ecology, what unique role do indigenous traditions play?)
 
 

 
 

 
 
Identify key aspects of Buddhism and explain ways in which it shapes—and is shaped by—social and political environments.
 
 
Response papers, short essays and exam questions. (How do the Japanese Zen traditions in Buddhism differ from Tibetan and Indian Buddhist traditions? How do these differences reflect pressures within and outside of Japanese society? Include discussion of religious traditions that developed in Japan before Buddhism first arrived there.)
US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
na
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
na
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Gethin, Rupert. The Foundations of Buddhism. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998. ISBN-10: 0192892231 ISBN-13: 978-0192892232. $23.32
Strong, John S., ed. The Experience of Buddhism (3rd edition). Wadsworth Publishing, 2007. ISBN-10: 0495094862. ISBN-13: 978-0495094869. $65.84
Stryk, Lucien, ed. The World of the Buddha: A Reader. New York: Grove Press, 1968. ISBN-10: 080213095X. ISBN-13: 978-0802130952. $17.00
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
none
This course is a standard part of Professor McLaughin's teaching load.

GEP suffices


Student Learning Outcomes

GEP suffices


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes15In-class quizzes, 3 @ 5
Final Exam25Final exam
Attendance10Class attendance
Midterm25Midterm exam
Written Assignment25Class Participation and Weekly Posts
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
The Buddha and his world: Society in India at the time of the Buddha.1 wkSee syllabus
Karma and cosmology1 wkSee syllabus
Early teachings of Buddhism2 wksSee syllabus
Upholding the Dharma as a community: monastics, lay practitioners, and rulers1 wkSee syllabus
The Great Vehicle: the rise of Mahāyāna Buddhism1 wkSee syllabus
Tantric Buddhism and Buddhism on the move outside India1 wkSee syllabus
Tantric Buddhism and its Tibetan developments1 wkSee syllabus
Buddhism transformed in China1 wkSee syllabus
Pure Land Buddhism1 wkSee syllabus
An introduction to Chan/Zen Buddhism1 wkSee syllabus
Buddhism in the contemporary world: Buddhist politics in Southeast Asia1 wkSee syllabus
Buddhism in the contemporary world: Monastic women challenge tradition1 wkSee syllabus
Who is a Buddhist?1 wkSee syllabus
Review for Final Exam1 wkSee syllabus
GER>GEP Providing last approved information
Last approved syllabus 1991
Catalog description reviewed in 2012
No university approved GEP information found in records

CIM notes:
16 weeks added as course length based on university standards
GEP attribute indicated in CIM
Course objectives added from last approved syllabus
Grading/evaluation methods added from last approved syllabus
Course delivery needed in CIM
Student Learning Outcomes needed in CIM
GEP outcomes and measures needed in CIM

Syllabus notes (review of last approved syllabus):
Syllabus Review based on the Syllabus Regulations page: https://policies.ncsu.edu/regulation/reg-02-20-07/

The following statements, which can be found at the above link, should be added to the syllabus:
Integrity statement
Students with Disabilities statement
Electronic Components statement
Policies, Rules, and Regulations (PRRs) statement.

Please edit the syllabus to include the following:
Instructor information
Course info (credit hours, semester, etc.)
Requisites (indicate if there are none)
Student learning outcomes that are measurable
GEP category, measures, and outcomes
Any course expenses including textbooks
Catalog description matching that in CIM
Any additional components such as labs
Projected schedule based on a 16 week semester
Late work policy per instructor
Attendance policy including excused absence criteria and number of acceptable absences along with any academic penalties

RLB 07/09/2018
Key: 4863
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