Viewing: REL 333 : Chinese Religions

Last approved: Sat, 17 Nov 2018 09:01:15 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 09 Oct 2018 16:32:37 GMT

Changes proposed by: n51ls801
Change Type
Major
REL (Religious Studies)
333
019254
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Chinese Religions
Chinese Religions
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religious Studies (16PHI)
38.0201
Religion/Religious Studies.
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Upon Demand
Fall 2020
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Levi McLaughlin
Associate Professor of Religious Studies

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3030NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16RELSTBAB. A. in Religious StudiesElective
16RSMMinor in Religious StudiesElective
Survey of Chinese religions from prehistoric times to present. Confucianism, Daoism, primary Buddhist schools in China, spirit possession, divination and popular religious worship.

No revision. GEP-HUM review required.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will be able to construct a historical and theoretical framework for analysis of the religious, political, and social contexts of Chinese religious traditions and for developing comparative questions that emerge within this analytical framework.
 
 
Response papers, exam questions. (Ex. Although Confucianism is not among the five religions officially recognized by the current government of China, Confucianism had a profound influence on the conduct of Chinese governments for many centuries. Other Chinese religious traditions, e.g., Daoism, Chan Buddhism, emphasize disengagement with political life. Do participants in diverse Chinese religious traditions experience the world in different ways that would justify this difference in engagement, or do they interpret shared experience in different ways? How should one determine that one of these explanations is more nearly correct?)
 
 
Students will be able to describe Chinese religious traditions and will analyze how definitions of their practices, doctrines, and traditions as “religion” have informed interpretations of this category and its genealogy.
 
 
Response papers, exam questions. (Ex. Many Chinese who identify as Protestants or Muslims see no conflict between so doing and also practicing what has been called “Daoism” or “Chinese folk religion.” Both of the latter terms are Western inventions. What kind of criteria should be used in determining whether a practice is, or is not, religious? Is there any applicable difference between being religious and being spiritual in this context?)
 
 
Students will be able to analyze a variety of texts – both primary and secondary – to understand critical theory and to cultivate ways of expanding upon theoretical concepts. They will refine their comprehension of these texts and they will learn how to write more precisely and persuasively than before by explicating arguments.
 
 
Response papers, exam questions. (Ex. How did the Confucian Mencius (Mengzi) argue for the obligation to be a “whistleblower” when one believes that a ruler is following a wrong course of action? Be sure to explain the relevance of what Mencius says in defense of the decision of the sage-king Shun to marry without telling his father. How does the argument relate to Mencius’ criticism of Mohism’s consequentialism?)
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Students will be able to identify key aspects of Chinese religious traditions and understand ways in which they shape—and are shaped by—social and political environments.
 
 
Response papers, exam questions. (Ex. While atheism and the suppression of traditional Chinese religious traditions were official People’s Republic of China policy under Mao Zedong, many have noted the similarities between Chinese religious practices and the ways in which Maoist ideology was promulgated. Describe some of these similarities while also highlighting differences in practice between Maoists and at least two of the many Chinese traditions.)
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 
Students will be able to synthesize and compare distinguishing characteristics of Chinese religious traditions.
 
 
Response papers, exam questions. (Ex. Detail some of the reciprocal influences between the kinds of Chinese Christianity, on the one hand and Chan Buddhism and Chinese folk religions, on the other. How has the relative emphasis on doctrine in Christianity and on practice in Chan Buddhism and Chinese folk religions shaped these influences?)
 
 
Students will be able to identify key aspects of Chinese religious traditions and understand ways in which they shape—and are shaped by—social and political environments.
 
 
Assessment: Response papers, exam questions. (The current government of China formally recognizes only five religions: Buddhism, Daoism, Islam, Protestantism, and Catholicism. In the early twenty-first century there has been increasing official recognition of Confucianism and Chinese folk religion as part of China's cultural inheritance. How does lack of official status affect the ways in which Confucianism and Chinese folk religion are practiced? Why has the Chinese government given these traditions increased recognition in the 21st century?)
US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
none
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
na
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
1. Wing-Tsit Chan, ed., A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy, (Princeton University Press, 1969) $33.75 new, $7.00 used (available for download at https://archive.org/details/ASourceBookInChinesePhilosophy and two hard copies via https://catalog.lib.ncsu.edu/record/NCSU803006 ) [Chan]
2. Wu Cheng’en, trans. WJF Jenner, Journey to the West (16thC) (Foreign Languages Press, 1955) available for download at https://chine.in/fichiers/jourwest.pdf
3. Mayfair Mei-Hui Yang, ed., Chinese Religiosities: Afflictions of Modernity and State Formation (University of California Press, 2008), $19.99 new, also e-book https://catalog.lib.ncsu.edu/record/NCSU4155544 [Yang]
4. Xinzhong Yao and Yanxia Zhao, Chinese Religion: A Contextual Approach [YZ] (Bloomsbury, 2010), $30.76 new, $16.00 used.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
none
This course will be a standard part of Professor McLaughlin's course load.

GEP suffices


Student Learning Outcomes

GEP suffices


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Attendance10Class attendance
Participation10Class participation
Midterm25Midterm exam
Final Exam25Final exam
Quizzes15In-class quizzes
Written Assignment15Weekly response papers/posts
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
(Dis)orientatlon 1.5 wksSee syllabus.
Religious Culture in Old China 1.5 wksSee syllabus.
Key Moments for Sects and Thought 4.5 wksSee syllabus.
Rites, Fairs and Festivals1 wkSee syllabus.
Journey to the West as Kaleidoscope 3 wksSee syllabus.
Modern Traumas and Transformations 3.5 wksSee syllabus.
GER>GEP Providing last approved information
Last approved syllabus 1999
Catalog description reviewed in 2012
No university approved GEP information found in records

CIM notes:
16 weeks added as course length based on university standards
GEP attribute indicated in CIM
Course objectives added from last approved syllabus
Grading/evaluation methods added from last approved syllabus
Course delivery needed in CIM
Student Learning Outcomes needed in CIM
GEP outcomes and measures needed in CIM

Syllabus notes (review of last approved syllabus):
Syllabus Review based on the Syllabus Regulations page: https://policies.ncsu.edu/regulation/reg-02-20-07/

The following statements, which can be found at the above link, should be added to the syllabus:
Integrity statement (current syllabus does not include honor pledge)
Students with Disabilities statement (current syllabus has incorrect Disability Resources location)
Electronic Components statement
Policies, Rules, and Regulations (PRRs) statement.

Please edit the syllabus to include the following:
Instructor information
Course info (credit hours, semester, etc.)
Student learning outcomes that are measurable
GEP category, measures, and outcomes
Catalog description matching that in CIM
Any additional components such as labs
Projected schedule based on a 16 week semester
Late work policy per instructor

RLB 07/09/2018
Key: 4864
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