Viewing: REL 334 : Japanese Religions

Last approved: Sat, 17 Nov 2018 09:01:17 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 19 Oct 2018 01:40:53 GMT

Changes proposed by: n51ls801
Change Type
Major
REL (Religious Studies)
334
019255
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Japanese Religions
Japanese Religions
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religious Studies (16PHI)
38.0201
Religion/Religious Studies.
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2021
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Levi McLaughlin
Associate Professor of Religious Studies

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture4040Nonone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16RELSTBAB. A. in Religious StudiesElective
16RSMMinor in Religious StudiesElective
Survey of various strands of Japanese religious life from prehistoric times until present. Kami worship; primary Buddhist schools in Japan; Japanese Christianity; Confucianism; and New Religions.

No revisions. GEP-HUM review required.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Construct a historical and theoretical framework for analysis of the religious, political, and social contexts of Japanese religious traditions and for developing comparative questions that emerge within this analytical framework.
 
 
Take-home examinations, quizzes, and weekly writing exercises.
Sample prompt: There are some Japanese religious traditions in which the emphasis on political engagement is much stronger than in others. Do participants in diverse Japanese religious traditions experience the world in different ways that allegedly justify this difference in attitudes and behavior, or do they interpret shared experience in different ways? How should one determine that one of these explanations is more nearly correct?
 
 
Describe Japanese religious traditions and explain how classification of these practices, doctrines, and traditions as “religion” have informed understandings of the concept of religion and its genealogy.
 
 
Take-home examinations, quizzes, and weekly writing exercises.
Sample Prompt: Some Japanese who engage in Shintō practices and rituals assert that they are not religious. What kind of criteria should be used in determining whether a practice is, or is not, religious? Is there any applicable difference between being religious and being spiritual in this context?"
 
 
Students will read a variety of primary and secondary texts and, in writing, demonstrate their understanding of critical theory and explore ways of expanding upon theoretical concepts.
 
 
Take-home examinations, quizzes, and weekly writing exercises.
Sample prompt: Zen koans are often presented in non-Asian popularizations as clever little puzzles that depend on wordplay. How is this popular image a distortion of the training role of koans in Japanese Zen traditions? In what way do koans and traditional commentary on them encapsulate rigorous arguments offered to justify not only abstract epistemological and metaphysical conclusions but various concrete, daily life practices? Discuss one koan and explain how it encapsulates rigorous argument. Be sure to present the argument!
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Identify key aspects of Japanese religious traditions and understand ways in which they shape—and are shaped by—social and political environments.
 
 
Response papers, short essays and exam questions. (Ex. Explain some of the ways in which Japanese folk performing arts and anime are expressive of Japanese religious traditions. How is the relative lack of any doctrine of original sin in Japanese culture reflected in these performing arts and in anime? Does contemporary Japanese obscenity law result from precepts introduced by Japanese Christianity, or does that law have different roots in Japanese culture? Keep in mind the post-WWII history of Japanese law.)
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Synthesize and compare distinguishing characteristics of Japanese religious traditions.
 
 
Response papers, short essays and exam questions.
Sample measure: Detail some of the reciprocal influences between Japanese Christianity on the one hand and Japanese Buddhism and Shintō, on the other. How has the relative emphasis on doctrine in Christianity and on practice in Japanese Buddhism and Shintō shaped these influences?
 
 

 
 

 
 
Identify key aspects of Japanese religious traditions and explain ways in which they shape—and are shaped by—social and political environments.
 
 
Response papers, short essays and exam questions.
Sample measure: Why are seemingly physically and psychologically punishing practices elements of some Japanese religious traditions? While broadly similar practices can be found in many religious traditions world-wide, what is distinctively Japanese about these religious practices? How is their use implicitly justified and what local political forces helped to give rise to them and to keep them in place over hundreds of years?
US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
na
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
na
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See syllabus (all readings posted at course web site)
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
None
This course is part of Professor McLaughlin's standard load.

By the end of the course, students will have:



  1. Achieved basic familiarity with important doctrinal and practical facets of Japanese religion.

  2. Explored a variety of definitions of “religion” and questioned the applicability of these definitions in Japanese cultural contexts.

  3. Practiced reading a variety of texts, both primary and secondary, as a route to gaining a sympathetic yet critical understanding of religious tradition.

  4. Refined communication skills through classroom discussion, essays, and examinations.


Student Learning Outcomes

GEP suffices


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Attendance10Class attendance
Written Assignment25Class Participation and Weekly Posts
Midterm25Midterm exam
Final Exam25Final exam
Quizzes15In-class quizzes, 3 @ 5
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction1 wkSee syllabus
Everyday Life and Extraordinary Circumstances: Some Examples1 wkSee syllabus
“Religion” Comes to Japan2 wksSee syllabus
Origins and Origin Myths1 wkSee syllabus
The Arrival and Assimilation of Buddhism1 wkSee syllabus
Worlds of Medieval Buddhism1 wkSee syllabus
Single Practice Movements in Japanese Buddhism 1: Pure Land1 wkSee syllabus
Single Practice Movements 2: Zen1 wkSee syllabus
Single Practice Movements 3: Nichiren2 wksSee syllabus
Christianity in Japan1 wkSee syllabus
Telling Stories: Heroes and Vengeful Spirits1 wkSee syllabus
“New” Religions: Theoretical Concepts1 wkSee syllabus
Japanese Religion in Manga and Anime1 wkSee syllabus
GER>GEP Providing last approved information
Last approved syllabus 1999
Catalog description reviewed in 2012
No university approved GEP information found in records

CIM notes:
16 weeks added as course length based on university standards
GEP attribute indicated in CIM
Course objectives added from last approved syllabus
Grading/evaluation methods added from last approved syllabus
Course delivery needed in CIM
Student Learning Outcomes needed in CIM
GEP outcomes and measures needed in CIM

Syllabus notes (review of last approved syllabus):
Syllabus Review based on the Syllabus Regulations page: https://policies.ncsu.edu/regulation/reg-02-20-07/

The following statements, which can be found at the above link, should be added to the syllabus:
Integrity statement (current syllabus does not include honor pledge)
Students with Disabilities statement (current syllabus has incorrect Disability Resources location)
Electronic Components statement
Policies, Rules, and Regulations (PRRs) statement.

Please edit the syllabus to include the following:
Instructor information
Course info (credit hours, semester, etc.)
Student learning outcomes that are measurable
GEP category, measures, and outcomes
Catalog description matching that in CIM
Any additional components such as labs
Projected schedule based on a 16 week semester
Late work policy per instructor

RLB 07/09/2018
Key: 4865
Preview Bridge