Viewing: REL 350 : Introduction to Judaism

Last approved: Sat, 17 Nov 2018 09:01:18 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 10 Oct 2018 09:56:21 GMT

Changes proposed by: n51ls801
Change Type
Major
REL (Religious Studies)
350
019257
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Introduction to Judaism
Introduction to Judaism
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religious Studies (16PHI)
38.0201
Religion/Religious Studies.
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Even Years
Fall 2019
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Verena Kasper-Marienberg
Assistant Professor of History

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture2525NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16RELSTBAB. A. in Religious StudiesElective
16RSMMinor in Religious StudiesElective
16JSTMMinor in Jewish StudiesElective
A survey of Jewish religious traditions from the bible through the present day. Evolution of major religious ideas through classical texts including torah, Talmud, philosophical and mystical literature, and contemporary fiction.

No revision; GEP-HUM review required.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will be able to narrate the major changes and continuities in Jewish history and religious culture from antiquity to the modern period, having explored in depth Jewish primary sources & artifacts.
 
 
Weekly reading responses, student presentation, papers and exam questions
(Ex. exam question: Choose one Jewish life cycle ritual (for example circumcision, bar mitzvah) and describe at least 3 related customs that were discussed in class or your readings that were practiced in different time periods and geographic regions. Why was this ritual significant in shaping Jewish identity?)
 
 
Students will be able to evaluate the kinds of oral, written and visual primary sources Jewish studies scholars rely upon to reconstruct Jewish history and cultures in different periods and places; and to
critique interpretations of past or current world events relating to Jewish history and culture.
 
 
Weekly reading responses, student presentation, papers and exam questions
(Ex. response question: We read a Jewish and a non-Jewish account of the Rhineland massacres during the first crusade (1096 CE). Describe and try to explain the differences between the two accounts (noting for example dates, places, number of people killed, descriptions of violence, motifs, consequences, interpretation of the events etc.).)
 
 
Students will be able to: articulate central questions in Jewish religious culture and history and make arguments in response to these questions from primary sources; identify and explain major events in Jewish history and ideas in Jewish religious traditions; and will be able to construct an original academic argument grounded in primary source evidence and knowledge of academic literature that meets the standards of the Religious Studies discipline.
 
 
Assessment: Weekly reading responses, student presentations, papers, and exam questions
(Ex. exam question: We have visited the Judaica department in the NC Art museum and we saw examples of Jewish ritual objects as well as paintings of Jewish artists. In your museum response you should present arguments for and against the category of “Jewish art” in cultural institutions. What can be problematic about this term? Why can it be useful?)
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Students will be able to Identify the major political, economic, social and cultural forces that have shaped Jewish history and cultures around the world, focusing on Europe, the Middle East, and Northern Africa; will be able to analyze a variety of primary sources and artifacts related to Jewish history and cultures in different periods and places - having explored the diasporic experience of Jewish communities from a global perspective.
 
 
Weekly reading responses, student presentation, papers and exam questions
(Ex. essay question: Describe the influence of non-Jewish authorities on the communal leadership and administration of Jewish communities before modernity (before 1800). Choose three historic examples from different time periods and geographic areas we discussed in class and compare the differences in degrees of autonomy.)
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 
Students will be able to describe the connections between current different Jewish denominations and religious movements and their historic predecessors in Europe and to reconstruct the exchange of ideas and knowledge in Jewish religious and cultural traditions between different regions of the world.
 
 
Assessment: Weekly reading responses, student presentation, papers and exam questions
(Ex. response question: Describe at least six examples of ideas, people, and/or religious traditions that came from Europe to the US during the 19th century for one Jewish denomination (Orthodox, Conservative, Reform).)
 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
none
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
na
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
1. Philip S. Alexander, ed., Textual Sources for the Study of Judaism (Chicago: Chicago UP, 1990). $29.76
2. Dan Cohn-Sherbok, Judaism: History, Belief, and Practice (New York: Routledge, 2017). $19.95
3. Raymond P. Scheindlin, Short History of Jewish People (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000). $15.95
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
NC Museum of Art Judaica exhibit guided tour. Students will be responsible for their own transportation to the Museum.

Movie screening of _Raise the Roof_ at DH Hill Library, 5-7 PM on date specified.

If you cannot make it to these events, the instructor will assign an alternative assignment for you.
This course is a standard part of Professor Kasper-Marienberg's teaching load.

GEP suffices


Student Learning Outcomes

GEP suffices


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Short Paper25Presentation and paper
Written Assignment10Reading responses
Midterm15Midterm exam
Final Exam20Final exam
Participation10Class participation
Written Assignment20Event responses
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction & Jewish Religious Life Cycle and Year2.5 wksSee syllabus.
Jewish History I1 wkSee syllabus.
Jewish History II1 wkSee syllabus.
Jewish Rituals and Practices1.5 wksSee syllabus.
Jewish Spaces1.5 wksSee syllabus.
Jewish Art1.5 wksSee syllabus.
Jewish Texts and Authors I1 wkSee syllabus.
Jewish Texts and Authors II1 wkSee syllabus.
Jewish Archives1 wkSee syllabus.
Jewish Denominational Traditions I1.5 wkSee syllabus.
Jewish Denominational Traditions II1.5 wksSee syllabus.
GER>GEP Providing last approved information
Last approved syllabus effective 2002
Catalog description reviewed in 2012
No university approved GEP information found in records

CIM notes:
16 weeks added as course length based on university standards
GEP attribute indicated in CIM
Course objectives added from last approved syllabus
Grading/evaluation method added from last approved syllabus
Course delivery and term offering needed in CIM
Student Learning Outcomes needed in CIM
GEP outcomes and measures needed in CIM


Syllabus notes (review of last approved syllabus):
Syllabus Review based on the Syllabus Regulations page: https://policies.ncsu.edu/regulation/reg-02-20-07/

The following statements, which can be found at the above link, should be added to the syllabus:
Students with Disabilities statement (current syllabus has incorrect Disability Resources location)
Electronic Components statement
Policies, Rules, and Regulations (PRRs) statement
Academic Integrity

Please edit the syllabus to include the following:
Course info (credit hours, semester, etc.)
Requisites (indicate if there are none)
Student learning outcomes that are measurable
GEP category, measures, and outcomes
Any course expenses including current textbooks
Catalog description matching that in CIM
Any additional components such as labs
Projected schedule based on a 16 week semester
Grading methods and scale
Attendance policy including excused absence criteria and number of acceptable absences along with any academic penalties

RLB 07/09/2018
Key: 4867
Preview Bridge