Preview Workflow

Viewing: SOC 202 : Principles of Sociology

Last approved: Fri, 28 Apr 2017 08:02:33 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 28 Apr 2017 08:02:33 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
SOC (Sociology)
202
019446
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Principles of Sociology
Princ of Sociology
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Sociology (16SOC)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Summer 1 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Michaela DeSoucey
Assistant Professor of Sociology

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture27530-75Yes10-12 Sections per semester
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16SOCBASociology MajorRequired
16CRIMNBACriminology MajorRequired
13EDGENBSEducation: General Studies MajorRequired
16SOMSociology MinorRequired
16CLMCriminology MinorRequired
Introduction to sociology. Analyses of key processes and institutions including interaction, inequality, organization, socialization, and social change. Addresses experiences and outcomes of diverse groups in U.S. society. Includes core sociological concepts, methods, theories.

The experiences and outcomes of diverse groups in U.S. society are central to sociology, and are a key component of this course, which introduces students to sociology. This change brings the catalog description in line with the content of SOC 202. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Social Sciences
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Examine and analyze your own life experiences using a sociological perspective and “the sociological imagination,” partially in order to reflect on your own thinking processes.
 
 
Assignment for 2-page reflection paper (links to GEP outcome of demonstrated understanding of socialization, social inequality, group behavior, culture, and social institutions):

Consider the many ways you were socialized by your family, peers, and school.
In what ways was your socialization gendered?
In what ways did it defy gender stereotypes?
For example: what toys did you play with as a child? What household chores did you perform? What extracurricular activities or academic pathways were you encouraged to pursue (or discouraged from)?
How does your socialization fit with the idea of gender being "socially constructed"?
 
 
Distinguish how a sociological perspective helps us explain, analyze, and form data-based generalizations about contemporary social issues.
 
 
I rely on the midterm and final exam to assess the breadth and depth of student knowledge in this domain. When I design questions like this, I generally want students to be able to link broad ideas and
generalizations to specific concepts or data-driven examples. I make this expectation explicit in class, and I present information in lectures that makes these connections apparent.

Example multiple choice questions:

Based on the results of a representative sample of students at one high school, a study claims that “the majority of high school students in the U.S. today believe premarital sex is wrong.” You criticize this claim because the results may not translate to other high schools or high school students. Your concern addresses the study’s:
a. validity. b. generalizability. c. accuracy. d. reflexivity


If you possess a sociological perspective, and someone asks you to conduct research on unemployment rates in a city of fifty million people of working age where fifteen million (30 percent of that population) are unemployed, what would you conclude?
a. We should consider the city’s, as well as the larger society’s, economic and political structures.
b. We should do a survey about the work ethic of the average citizen.
c. We should worry about the intelligence level of unemployed workers.
d. We should ask those who are unemployed how much they want to work.

Example essay question:

- A recent study of young people’s marriage ideals and expectations by sociologist Kathleen Gerson found the following (demonstrated in a chart). Analyze this chart and explain her findings.
 
 
Evaluate works, questions, and claims made by others (from the media, politicians, etc.) drawing upon the sociological theories and concepts learned in class and using critical and creative thinking skills.
 
 
I use a range of assessment tools here, woven throughout the course materials, meetings, and exams, discussions where students need to find and analyze examples from media, newspaper articles, etc; data workshops such as one that has students (in groups) working to examine census data on occupational wage gaps; and the final assignment for the course (which involves watching and debating a film with assigned 'sides' for the debate based on sociological concepts we covered (gender, race, class, family), then writing an essay that reflects on the process of gathering and debating evidence for the debate).

An example exam short essay question is:
- Define and explain the principle of cumulative advantage/disadvantage. What does this term mean, and how does it relate to contemporary wealth inequality in the U.S. today? Give at least two examples from course materials (readings, lectures and graphs, etc).
Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Outcome: Evaluate the cultural, economic, institutional, and historical factors that shape personal and group identities.
 
 
Sample measure: Write a 2-3 page essay about 'gender socialization,' and discuss with each other on a "concept application day" using this prompt:

Consider the many ways you were socialized by your family, peers, school, and other social institutions such as media or religion. In what ways was your socialization gendered? In what ways did it defy or challenge gender stereotypes? For example: what toys did you play with as a child? What household chores did you perform? What extracurricular activities or academic pathways were you encouraged to pursue (or discouraged from)? In your essay, use course readings and material from lectures to support your interpretation of your 'data.'
 
 
Outcome: Categorize and compare processes in the social world that filter contemporary inequality through social institutions, such as schools, workplaces, neighborhoods, and the state
 
 
Sample measure: Essay question on an exam:

Beverley Tatum defines racism as ‘prejudice plus power.’ Explain what this means, specifically focusing on how racism is embedded in institutions and operates as a system of inequality in U.S. society today. Illustrate your explanation with at least two examples from course materials and/or from recent news. Also be sure to clarify the distinction between active racism and passive racism.

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
none
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
The Real World, 4th edition by Kerris Farris and Jill Stein

Selected scholarly articles and excerpts, book chapters, and news articles
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
theory & methods - textbook plus chapter by Joel Best on The Importance of Social Statistics
socialization - textbook
groups & networks - textbook, plus article on 'social capital'
culture - textbook, plus news articles on baby name trends
deviance and power - textbook
social inequalities - class, race, gender, sexuality - textbook plus selected articles, chapters, and policy reports
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
none
This course is part of faculty member's regular course load. No new resources are required.

  • Demonstrate understanding of socialization, social inequality, group behavior, culture, organizations, and social institutions.

  • Recognize, understand, and explain different sociological research methodologies and findings (and their strengths and limitations).

  • Apply sociological concepts and theories to real-world patterns, trends, and situations, from micro- to macro-levels and particularly related to social inequality.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:


1) Distinguish how a sociological perspective helps us explain, analyze, and form data-based generalizations about contemporary social issues.


2) Evaluate works, questions, and claims made by others (from the media, politicians, etc.) drawing upon the sociological theories and concepts learned in class and using critical and creative thinking skills.


3) Examine and analyze your own life experiences using a sociological perspective and “the sociological perspective,” partially in order to reflect on your own thinking processes.


4) Analyze how religious, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability, and/or age identities are shaped by cultural and societal influences. (GEP USD Objective #1 Outcome)


5) Categorize and compare historical, social, political, and/or economic processes producing diversity, equality, and structured inequalities in the U.S. (GEP USD Objective #2 Outcome)


6) Illustrate, both orally and in writing, your thoughts/ideas related to sociological subject matter, as well as explain the intellectual standards for critical and creative thinking. 


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Attendance5 percentAttendance will be taken at every class meeting. Students are allowed two unexcused absences. Documentation is required for excused absences and must be provided within one week of the absence in question, and it must specify the exact dates to be excused. More than two unexcused absences will results in deductions from your final grade.
Multiple exams50 percentThere will be two exams: one in-class midterm and a final exam (25% each). Exams will cover all course materials and will consists of multiple choice and short answer questions.
Participation20 percentStudents must register for, attend, and participate in one of the Friday discussion sections with one of our teaching assistants. Sometimes these days will require you to turn in work. These assignments amount to 15% of the participation grade. The remaining 5% will come from participation in discussion and group activities.
Written Assignment25 percent(15%) Three Concept Application Day write-ups (1-2 pages apiece, 5% each)

(10%) Belle reflection essay
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See Course Outline

aeherget (Thu, 16 Feb 2017 20:18:37 GMT): Rollback: AECHH: The addition of a GEP category is a major action. 2/16/2017
Key: 4873