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Viewing: SOC 203 : Current Social Problems

Last approved: Thu, 07 Sep 2017 08:02:29 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 07 Sep 2017 08:02:29 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
SOC (Sociology)
203
019453
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Current Social Problems
Current Social Problems
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Sociology (16SOC)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Spring 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Online (Internet)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
E. Megan Glancy
Lecturer

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture17530-80Yesn/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC10050Yesn/a

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16SOCBASociologyElective
16CRIMNBACriminologyElective
Examination of social problems linked to structures of economic, political, gender and racial inequality; including poverty, disease, racism, sexism, unemployment, psychological distress, educational failure, environmental destruction and violence. Possible solutions viewed from a variety of perspectives. Includes core sociological concepts, methods and theories.

Formal GEP social science review.  Course previously approved for US Diversity.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Social Sciences
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Distinguish how the structure of society and our culture contributes to and maintains social problems
 
 
Critical Thinking Activity 1: Post Secret

Log into the website www.postsecret.com. Look around the site and choose 2 cards to write about. You may also visit the post secret archive for a wider variety of cards to choose from : http://postsecretarchive.com/

Part I: Copy and paste the cards you chose to your submission. If you are unable to do so, you may give a brief description of the cards.

Part II: Using your sociological imagination analyze the cards you have chosen. Remember that you should choose cards that make sense to you and you feel are applicable to this exercise.

Your analysis should be specific and illustrate your understanding of the sociological imagination and how to apply it.

This activity is meant to get you thinking critically and sociologically. Keep in mind that sociologists look for the lesser-seen connections between pieces of information and are very much concerned with the role of the social world in creating/maintaining personal "troubles" such as those described in the post secrets.

To be successful at this activity you must do more than "scratch the surface". Look at these posts cards with a sociologist's eye to discover what they say about society. Consider these questions to get you going in your analysis:

How do the personal troubles discussed in the cards tie back to broader society?
What is the role of the social world in creating or maintaining the troubles described?
Do these personal troubles represent social issues, if so how?
How are these personal troubles significant to society? Why should we care/be concerned with this personal trouble?

In order to complete this exercise effectively, I anticipate that you will need to write 4-5 thoughtful paragraphs per card.
 
 
Apply sociological thinking, theory and research methods to social problems in the pursuit of potential solutions
 
 
Method Question (quiz):
Gender, self-esteem, crime rates, and religiosity are examples of
Select one:
a. samples
b. operational definitions
c. hypotheses
d. variables

Fill in the blank: _______________ research focuses not only on the objective nature of behavior but also on its meaning. [Answer: qualitative research]
 
 
Apply sociological perspectives and theory to the examination of specific social problems including problems in social institutions and problems related to experiences of difference
 
 
Online Written Discussion Prompt:

Consider what you have learned about race and gender as well as the programs such as Affirmative Action put into place to remedy discrimination and inequality. Sociologically speaking, what is the purpose of Affirmative Action programs? Why are they so hotly debated in American society when we rarely talk about things such as legacy admissions or white privilege? Inform your points with information from the course specifically relying on sociological theory and class materials.
Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Apply sociological perspectives and theory to the examination of specific social problems including problems in social institutions and problems related to experiences of difference
 
 
Quiz Question:

Very briefly (1-2 sentences) explain what McIntyre means when she says that "Isms" are different from ordinary discrimination.
 
 
Critically and skeptically examine the social world, past and present, using your sociological imagination to identify and discuss what constitutes a social problem and the roles of the social in personal troubles
 
 
Online Written Discussion Prompt:

Consider what you have learned about race and gender as well as the programs such as Affirmative Action put into place to remedy discrimination and inequality. Sociologically speaking, what is the purpose of Affirmative Action programs? Why are they so hotly debated in American society when we rarely talk about things such as legacy admissions or white privilege? Inform your points with information from the course specifically relying on sociological theory and class materials.
 
 

 
 

 
 
Critically assess personal beliefs, social positions, cultural advantages and disadvantages relating to the social problems we examine
 
 
Discussion Prompt:

Using your sociological imagination think about the statuses you occupy in society. Identify and describe one important status that you occupy. How do you portray that status to others? What are the expectations for your behavior based on your status and where do those expectations come from? What happens when you do not meet these expectations?
Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
McIntyre, Lisa. 2014. The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology. New York, NY: McGraw Hill.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached course schedule.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
None.
No Change.

This course introduces contemporary social problems in the context of sociology, the study of human interaction.  Topics include problems of well-being such as crime and family problems, problems of inequality such as poverty, gender and racial inequality and solutions and suggestions for social change.  Upon completion, students should have a working knowledge of basic sociological principles including sociological thinking, perspectives and research methods.  In addition, students should obtain an understanding of specific social problems and be able to take a sociological stance on issues pertaining to American society and culture. 


Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:


- Critically and skeptically examine the social world, past and present, using their sociological imagination to 


-Identify and discuss what constitutes a social problem and the roles of the social in personal troubles


-Distinguish how the structure of society and our culture contribute to and maintains social problems


-Apply sociological perspectives and theory to the examination of specific social problems including problems in social institutions and problems related to experiences of difference


- Support positions on social problems using sociological evidence and demonstrate acute critical thinking skills


- Critically assess personal beliefs, social positions, cultural advantages and disadvantages relating to the social problems we examine


-Apply sociological thinking, theory and research methods to social problems in the pursuit of potential solutions


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation10 percent Students are expected to be engaged and participatory in class. This means not only completing the formal requirements (such as reviewing all assigned materials and completing assignments) of the course but also being informally engaged. Informal engagement manifests through students' cultivation of knowledge and sharing knowledge/learning/insights with others in the "classroom." Think about the traditional classroom where students meet face-to-face, and how students can bring new and interesting insights to the class when sharing. In an online classroom we cultivate this informal participation and engagement through raising questions and communicating with others in a variety of unique ways.

Students are encouraged to use the Student Q&A forum as a means of informal participation/engagement. Here you can raise questions, post personal insights (keeping in mind the aforementioned rules on respect, etc.) and "chat" with peers, instructors, and graders about class materials. I will also make periodic informal engagement opportunities available by posting students polls, data bases, open forums, small assignments, etc. Student's scores for this portions of the overall grade will reflect the amount of effort they put into making themselves an active participant in the course.
Discussion25 percentStudents will be assigned to an online (written) discussion group. Each student is expected to make a valuable contribution to the course and discussion group by participating regularly and thoughtfully in the group discussion board. Students will be asked to complete regular discussion posts addressing specific prompts related to readings and class materials. The prompts will ask students to think critically about the course materials and to reflect thoughtfully in order to address the prompt presented.

In each discussion students must be specific and use class materials (citing all sources) in order to receive credit. Original posts as well as responses MUST specifically reference class materials and be based on and supported by evidence from the class. Discussion forums are not a place for opinions but a place to thoughtfully and sociologically discuss the class materials. See the grading rubric in Moodle for more information on grading.
Written Assignment25 percentClass Activities: Students will be asked to complete two critical thinking activities based on class themes and materials. These activities will be varied and geared toward our inquiry guided learning objectives.
Quiz40 percent Students will have 3 quizzes over the course of the semester.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached course schedule

Key: 4874