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Viewing: SW 201 : Introduction to Social Work

Last approved: Wed, 15 Feb 2017 09:01:48 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 15 Feb 2017 09:01:48 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
SW (Social Work)
201
020525
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Introduction to Social Work
Introduction to Social Work
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Social Work (16SW)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Every Year
Spring 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
4
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Laboratory3.0
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jodi Hall
Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture219YesTwo sections per fall and spring semester.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This course, the basis for all other social work courses, provides an introduction to generalist practice and an overview of social work practice in a variety of settings. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for all advanced SW courses. This course is designed to acquaint students with social services typical of most American communities: what they are, who uses them, their impact, who pays for them, and who works in them. 40-hour pre-professional placement required, intern liability insurance required. Transportation to and from agency and/or community settings is the responsibility of the student.

No revision to course content.


Course title change: Now that the course is open to various majors some of these students do not expect "to have to learn about social work." The new title better describes the course and better aligns with the objectives and learning outcomes.


GEP USD: Submitting for U.S. Diversity as the course reviews the major policy and program developments in American social welfare and the emergence and development of professional social work. Emphasis will be on the socio-cultural context of policy and programs, and the ideas and ideals that shape social welfare. In addition, the basic elements of social policy development will be considered. This course provides the history, mission, philosophy, and evolution of social welfare policies and services that form the foundation of social welfare, particularly as they relate to poverty, racism, and efforts to address the needs of oppressed and marginalized populations.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Identify the extent to which a culture's structure and values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, create, or enhance privilege and power for members of specific identity groups.
 
 
Sample measure:
Video project – After volunteering for 40 hours in a community agency, students create a video in which they analyze the effects on the agency of the historical, social, political, and economic forces around US diversity issues. Students examine who has access to services and who provides them. They specifically consider race, class, gender, age, sexual orientation and how these factors have led to or reflect the systematic creation and maintenance of systems of oppression.
 
 
Discuss the historical, social, political, and economic processes that shaped the creation of the social welfare system and how the social services that typically exist in American communities reflect structural inequalities in US society.
 
 
Sample Final Exam Essay Scenario:

You are sitting at a table enjoying dinner with friends. One friend remarks, “I am tired of spending my money on poor people. They do not pay any taxes and they are lazy.” Another friend quickly chimes in and says, “I agree. All of the tax money just go to minorities that do not bother to work.” A third friend says, “People are poor by choice. Anyone that works everyday will be able to meet all of their needs without any help. I want to see more rules around what people can buy with food stamps. Besides, minorities used to work harder before they started receiving all of this free stuff” Another friend angrily informs everyone that she thinks it is unfair that illegal aliens get government assistance. The illegals get stuff automatic ally and do not even have to apply she stated. “It seems that everything is today benefits minorities and gay people” your friend concluded. You then turn to your friends and say…

Directions: Using the above scenario, discuss the historical, social, political, and economic processes that shaped the creation of the social welfare system and how the social services that typically exist in American communities reflect structural inequalities in US society. Construct a response to your friends respectfully and factually, using information learned in this class. You must demonstrate clear knowledge of how race and social class impact perceptions and outcomes. Draw upon what you learned about social programs, income inequality and taxes in the USA. You should also include the historical intersection of social services and racism that contribute to stereotypes and misinformation. How are these perceptions formed historically and how do they contribute to structural inequality?

You may draw upon any materials or videos that have been used in class or fact-based sources that you find on your own. Your response should be 2-3 typed pages double spaced using APA format. You must include a reference page to cite sources of information. This page is not part of the 2-3 pages of essay. You should begin working on your essay prior to the exam time. It is to be uploaded electronically on Moodle. Essay is worth 20 percent of exam grade.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
All seats
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
No restrictions
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
No restirctions
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
No prerequisites
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Suppes, M.A. & Wells, C.C. (2013). The Social Work Experience: An Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare. 6th ed. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Schedule attached
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
40 hours volunteer work in community agency.
No additional resources needed.

This is the first course in the social work curriculum; and as such, it provides an introduction to the profession, to the roles that social workers perform with clients and within agencies or communities, and to a variety of settings where social workers are employed.  The course provides an introduction to strengths-based practice, evidence-informed practice, and to client-centered/family-centered practice.  While this course is a requirement for the BSW major, students in other majors will find it helpful in understanding how society responds to human need.  A 40-hour pre-professional placement experience provides a context for students to analyze how one agency/program addresses human need.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Describe the social services typical of American communities including: child welfare, mental health, and family services, services for the elderly and people with disabilities, school social work, public welfare and others. (EPAS 2.1.1)

2. Identify what a professional social worker does. (EPAS 2.1.1)

3. Describe social work roles in social service agencies or settings. (EPAS 2.1.1)

4. Identify the knowledge, values, and skills necessary for professional social work practice. (EPAS 2.1.2)

5. Demonstrate beginning-level ability to assess client strengths and limitations. (EPAS 2.1.10b)

6. Explain similarities and differences in various ethnic and cultural groups’ needs and access to resources. (EPAS 2.1.4)

7. Analyze how religious, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability, and/or age identities are shaped by cultural and societal influences. (EPAS 2.1.4)

8. Identify the extent to which a culture's structure and values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, create, or enhance privilege and power for members of specific identity groups. (EPAS 2.1.4)

9. Apply written, oral communication, and analytical skills needed by professional social workers.  (EPAS 2.1.3)

10. Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication during community agency volunteer experience requirement. (EPAS 2.1.1)


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Test40Exam I - 10, Exam II - 15, Exam III/Final - 15
Project6Agency Diversity Video
Other0Volunteer Work Agreement - No points towards grade
Other10Volunteer hours/documentation
Quizzes12Quizzes
Participation10Attendance and Participation
presentation16Group Presentation
Short Paper6Volunteer Experience Reflection Paper
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
N/ASee course syllabus
IN policy added; Title change added; run by CUC again for title change; 1/9/2017; JSD
Syllabus edited per David's suggestions; 1/23/2017; JSD
n51ls801 (Tue, 29 Nov 2016 00:37:31 GMT): Rollback: IN policy needed?
lamarcus (Thu, 09 Feb 2017 14:54:07 GMT): Phone call with departmental representatives: component change not intended. Information reverted to last-approved status.
Key: 5183