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Viewing: SW 290 : The Development of Social Welfare and Social Work in the U.S.

Last approved: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 08:02:36 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 08:02:36 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
SW (Social Work)
290
020530
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
The Development of Social Welfare and Social Work in the U.S.
Devlopment Social Welfare
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Social Work (16SW)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Spring 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Zelter
Lecturer and BSW Field Coordinator

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture219YesNormally two sections per semester.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This course reviews the major policy and program developments in American social welfare and the emergence and development of professional social work. Emphasis will be on the socio-cultural context of policy and programs, and the ideas and ideals that shape social welfare. In addition, the basic elements of social policy development will be considered. This course provides the history, mission, philosophy, and evolution of social welfare policies and services that form the foundation of social welfare, particularly as they relate to poverty, racism, and efforts to address the needs of oppressed and marginalized populations.

Submitting course for U.S. Diversity and Interdisciplinary Studies as we believe this meets the criteria.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
History: Describe how historical events, policies, and decisions, as illustrated by primary source materials, have influenced American experiences of race, class, and gender.
Social Work: Connect historical laws, policies, and practices with current socioeconomic and cultural realities that affect the lives of the persons whom social workers serve.
 
 
Essay questions
Example prompt (Social Work): How did the profession of Social Work evolve in the United States? Describe how the profession emerged, taking into consideration the various approaches to social work--from focusing primarily on personal morality and charitable service to focusing on social systems reform at various stages of history. Give a chronology of some significant steps in the formation of the profession.
Example prompt (History): Describe how various governmental and local real estate policies shaped the residential housing patterns that we now see in the United States. Begin with the promises of “40 Acres and a Mule” after the Civil War and name the 20th c. federal, state, or local laws, programs, policies, and practices that reflected discriminatory intent. Describe the effects of these housing policy decisions on various populations.
 
 
Identify historical patterns and practices in American social welfare history.
 
 
Quizzes on class text:
What was the main similarity between the Charity Organization Societies and the Settlement House movement, as both assisted the poor?
Select one:
__a. They both relied on volunteers from the privileged classes.
__b. They both focused on the need for moral uplift of individuals they served.
__c. They both worried about the problem of "dependency" among the poor.
__d. They both focused on changing socioeconomic conditions for the poor and immigrants.
 
 
Investigate an aspect of “hidden history” and present the basics of this historical situation to the class, showing how this topic influenced current social welfare realities.
 
 
Ten-minute oral presentation to the class on a topic of “hidden history.” Students select from a list of ten topic options. Topic examples include: (1) Black Panthers breakfast feeding program in Oakland, CA, that was adopted by our federal government as the national school breakfast program; (2) The 1930’s-1970’s eugenics program in which social workers participated in involuntary sterilizations of poor women—this program was actually adopted by German Nazis.
 
 
The disciplines that will be connected in this course are social work and history.
 
 
To establish a foundation in History, the instructor will use primary and secondary sources from English and American history (e.g., Poor Laws, Native Treaties with American colonists), as well as class text material. Students read these materials in groups, then respond to questions about content, intent, and effect, to increase critical thinking and historical analysis. To establish a foundation in Social Work, students are exposed to text material, videos, and primary sources that feature key players and movements in the foundation of the profession and the evolution of social work training and professional education. Students have an assignment in which they interview a current social worker to learn what that specific role (e.g., school social worker, therapist, court social worker) involves, so they might discern their own professional paths. To integrate these two disciplines, the instructor uses case examples to show the parallels between historical laws, policies, and social welfare practices with current social problems and concerns (Two examples: (1) the historical parallels between colonial debtors prisons and the criminalization of poverty through the War on Drugs and the school to prison pipeline; and (2) real estate redlining and bank discrimination policies as they relate to the creation of current urban ghettos).
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Describe how historical events, policies, and decisions have shaped the formation of identity groups--race, class, sexuality/gender, disability, age--in current culture.
 
 
Exam question regarding the intersection of social class and racial identity:

Describe how various governmental and local real estate policies shaped the residential housing patterns that we now see in the United States. Begin with the promises of “40 Acres and a Mule” after the Civil War and name the 20th c. federal, state, or local laws, programs, policies, and practices that reflected discriminatory intent. Describe the effects of these housing policy decisions on various populations. (Students are expected to show how these historical policies have created and perpetuated reduced socioeconomic status and limited educational opportunities for African-Americans and other marginalized groups.)
 
 

 
 

 
 
Describe how members of marginalized groups have taken action to improve their situations, in the context of a specific example of “hidden history.”
 
 
Ten-minute oral presentation to the class on a topic of “hidden history.” Students select from a list of ten topic options. Topic examples include: (1) Black Panthers breakfast feeding program in Oakland, CA, that was adopted by our federal government as the national school breakfast program; (2) The 1930’s-1970’s eugenics program in which social workers participated in involuntary sterilizations of poor women—this program was actually adopted by German Nazis.
 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
All
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
No restrictions
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
No restrictions
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
No prerequisites or restrictions
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Trattner, Walter I. (1999). From poor law to welfare state: A history of social welfare in America. (6th ed.). New York, NY: The Free Press.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
On syllabus - attached
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
None
No new resources needed.

Course Rationale


The purpose of this course is to build on SW 201 (Community Social Services) by helping students gain an understanding and critical perspective on the development of social systems and social policy in the United States.  It provides the background necessary for subsequent social work courses: the direct practice skills in SW 320 (Practice I) and SW 405 (Practice II), and the community practice skills in SW 408 (Practice III).  As such, it provides the historical context for and reflects the Mission Statement of the Department of Social Work.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1. Summarize social welfare history in the United States, applying interdisciplinary (social work, history, political science) theories and frameworks.

2. Develop a generalist social work practice that demonstrates awareness and appreciation of essential knowledge, values, and skills of interdisciplinary fields of practice with diverse groups.

3. Recognize values that enhance the quality of life across various racial and ethnic groups based on elements of generalist social justice, oppression, poverty, and services.

4. Develop a policy practice to advance social and economic well-being in the delivery of services in interdisciplinary practice settings.

5. Respond effectively to contexts that shape practice as they relate to human rights, social and economic justice;

6. Apply educational and specific practice requirements necessary for the delivery of social welfare services.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes32%You have 8 Moodle-based quizzes worth 4 points each. These quizzes assure that students have done their reading for the week’s topics and therefore can intelligently participate in class discussions and activities. The quizzes will open the week before they are due. The open-book, untimed quiz responses are due before class time on the assigned day; you have one chance to provide your responses. The answers and your results will be open to you as soon as the quiz time ends, at 7:30 on the morning the quiz is due.
Written Assignment28%Personal Snapshot (5%). This is a 2-page self-description due at the beginning of the second week of class. It will help me understand students’ backgrounds, interests, and needs.

Professional Narrative (10%). This is a paper to think through your role as a social work major and future professional, or as a non-major whose perceptions of future livelihood may be shaped by engagement in this social work course.

Heirs Interview (13%). This is an assignment to help you meet and learn about inspiring people in the field of social work and social justice organizing. With the professor, you will choose a person who is practicing in a field that interests you as a possible career path. The project will help you hone your interviewing skills and narrative writing abilities in APA style. There will be deadlines along the semester for these steps: (1) decide on your interview subject, (2) arrange the interview, (3) have the interview, and (4) submit the final paper.
Forum_post10%FORUMS (10%). You have two Moodle Forums, worth 5% each. Forums give you a chance to express your thoughts and feelings on emotionally powerful topics in a format that is less formal than a paper. You can also see and respond to what others write.
presentation10%SNAPSHOT PRESENTATION WITH A PARTNER (10%). Each student will give one short classroom presentation with a chosen partner, on a topic that enriches the class topic of the day: a “snapshot” of the times. You will sign up for these topics and dates early in the semester.
Final Exam15%FINAL EXAM (15%). This will be an in-class exam to reflect on the course.
Participation5%PARTICIPATION (5%). Participation includes both regular attendance and your level of energy and engagement in class. You need to both attend and add to discussions for the full 5%. You or your parents paid for this class—get the most out of it.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
N/ASee syllabus

despain (Sat, 23 Jan 2016 22:54:31 GMT): Rollback: Overhaul student learning outcomes and GEP material; see "Additional comments" in CIM; use CIM help bubbles for guidance.
aeherget (Mon, 20 Mar 2017 17:30:36 GMT): AECHH: Including additional GEP information at instructor's request via email 3/20/2017.
Key: 5184