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Viewing: FLF 212 : French: Language, Culture, and Technology

Last approved: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 08:02:16 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 08:02:16 GMT

Change Type
Major
FLF (Foreign Language - French)
212
023169
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
French: Language, Culture, and Technology
French Language Culture & Tech
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Foreign Languages & Literature (16FL)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Laura Call
Lecturer

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture1616NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: FLF 102 or FLF 110
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
A study of the language structures and vocabulary necessary for an intermediate level of communication in French together with cultural and technological issues of our global society, in the context of the French-speaking world and the European Union. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation for required field trip. Fulfills the FLF 201 requirement.

While the same course description is maintained, this represents a new design for the course, so it needs to be reviewed.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will apply their expanding French language skills to converse with native French-speaking professionals in different fields within a STEM problem area (e.g., health, the environment, etc.).
 
 
Pre-presentation written research assignment in which students generate questions for the expert visitor (in French). Students are evaluated based on their reading comprehension and sophistication of their questions. In-class performance of question and answer session with the expert assessed using a rubric based on linguistic skills and question content relevance to discussion.
 
 
Identify and describe the similarities and differences in medical training and insurance systems in French versus American culture.
 
 
Written assignment: example prompt - Based on your readings and the presentations from speakers, what similarities and differences do you observe in medical training and insurance systems in French versus American culture? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of each system in your view?
 
 
Students will demonstrate a developing critical awareness of STEM content and cultures in the U.S. and French-speaking countries.
 
 
Written assignment: For the final project of the FLF 212 course, students will be asked to identify and research a topic; engage in a creative project; OR do some other project of your design related to Language, Technology and Culture in France (should weigh STEM content heavily and discuss cultural specificities of that content).
 
 
The course examines technological and scientific cultures in the French-speaking world as compared to those in the United States. In addition to language-related instruction and course readings, the course invites Francophone researchers and professionals from a variety of STEM disciplines to discuss research topics (ex: mechanical engineering, bioinformatics, environmental journalism, etc.) and practices (ex: laboratory cultures, government funding procedures, student responsibilities within university systems, etc.) from their native countries in the French language. The instructor has a Ph.D. In French and a Master's degree in Environmental Science
 
 
The expertise in this course comes from the textbook and the instructor as concerns language skills and journal or newspaper articles and expert speaker presentations as concerns STEM content. Students' skills are developed using weekly critical thinking journals summarizing French news articles in English or French, preparatory assignments for and evaluations of invited expert speakers' presentations in French, and language textbook homework in French, which build up to a summative project partly in English and partly in French. Over the course of the semester, students prepare for speaker presentations by collecting information in each presenter’s discipline and asking questions of the presenters to elicit their perspectives in French. After presentations, the instructor leads discussions that encourage students to synthesize what they have learned to that point in the semester in French. At the end of the semester, students compile this information, reflect on what they have learned, and summarize their findings in a report in which they relate the various STEM disciplines to one another and to their personal experiences with STEM in American culture in English.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Students will compare and contrast the social and intellectual values of STEM professionals in various Francophone cultures with American cultures.
 
 
Recorded conversation prompt assessed using a rubric based on content synthesis and linguistic skills: Discuss your impression of the presenter’s description of laboratory culture in France as compared to laboratory culture in the United States and her professional reasons for choosing to work in the United States. Were you surprised to learn that there are differences in scientific cultures in the two nations? In which nation would you prefer to work? Why?
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 
Students will be able to describe and explain the history of university system in France, how it currently functions, and how it is funded.
 
 
Reflective writing prompt assessed using a rubric based on depth and detail of content and language skills: Knowing what you do about French higher education, what would happen if the French government decided to move to an American model? How would higher education change? How would French culture react to such changes?
 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
None
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
Yes
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Prerequisite: FLF 102 or FLF 110
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
Ability to speak, read, write, and comprehend elementary French
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Liaisons, 2nd edition, Wong, Weber-Fève, & VanPatten.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Visual Art Technologies (Liaisons pages 343 – 363), Media Technologies (Liaisons pages 364 – 381), Technological Privacy (Liaisons pages 399, 413, and 497 - 505, handouts), Lifestyles (Liaisons pages 421 – 431), Transportation Technologies (Liaisons pages 343 – 363), Personal Health & Medical Technologies (Liaisons pages 459 – 495, handouts), Environment & Society (Liaisons pages 506 – 518, handouts)
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
Field trip to FACTS (Franco-American Climate Talks Symposium), on-line workbook exercises, guest speakers: Dr. Denis Fourches (bioinformatics/France), Dr. Marie Muller (mechanical engineering – ultrasound/France), Dr. Victor Girondin (helicopter engineering/France), Jessica Blaylock (fisheries/Switzerland), Valerie Batta (licensed mediator/Cameroon), Hélène Crie (environmental journalist/France)
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
No additional resources needed.

The course will provide the historical background, grammatical structures, and specialized vocabulary to enable students to comprehend, engage with, and question native French speakers on topics such as technological history, individual behavior, healthcare, and university culture in French-speaking countries.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1. Identify, discuss, and explain cultural differences and similarities in technological history and use, individual behavior, health systems, and university and laboratory cultures in various STEM fields between Francophone countries and the United States using an intermediate level of French.

2. Demonstrate an understanding of, and ability to speak, read, and write French at an intermediate level.

3. Evaluate the work of others using the intellectual standards for critical and creative thinking.

4. Apply critical and creative thinking skills and behaviors in the process of solving problems or addressing questions.

5. Reflect on one's own thinking and the thinking of others.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes40%Lesson quizzes on grammar and vocabulary.
Written Assignment10%There will be Google doc assignments throughout the semester (see syllabus).
Homework20%Three times per week you will complete language-related iLrn homework on-line before coming to class.
Project15%Final project
Written Assignment15%Journal assignments.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Visual Art Technologies 2 weeksExamine history of visual arts technologies such as photography and film. Week one: Students will complete textbook activities introducing vocabulary for arts (painting, sculpture, film, theater, photography) and conditional verbs. Each day students will view a video or listen to radio program in French on how art conservation uses science and engineering to preserve, transport, and discovery (archaeology) previous arts. Week two: Students will read text Petites Histoires des Technologies and choose an art technology (camera, video camera, or stereo) about which they will research the history, the technological evolution, and possible future uses. At the end of the week, they will present their findings in groups and stimulate discussion with their classmates.
Media Technologies & Technological Privacy 3 weeksExamine history of media technologies such as the telephone, the television, and social media. Week one: Students will complete textbook activities introducing vocabulary for media technologies (computer/Internet, telephone/iphone) and grammar to discuss hypothetical situations. Then they will consider the differences between acceptable use of media in French versus American culture after a presentation from a native speaker on social media and handheld device culture in France. They will also observe Twitter and Facebook in French to see if they observe any cultural or linguistic similarities or differences with American social media and relate it to the presentation in writing. Week Two: Students will read text Petites Histoires de Technologie and choose a media technology (computer, telephone, Internet) about which they will research the history, the technological evolution, and possible future uses. At the end of the week, they will do a presentation on their findings.
Individual Characteristics & Lifestyles3 weeksIdentify and appreciate differences in individual characteristics and behaviors. Compare and contrast similar lifestyles in French and American cultures. Week one: Students will complete textbook activities introducing vocabulary on individual behaviors, personality traits, and lifestyles and grammar of reflexive and reciprocal verbs. They will have a presentation from and discussion with a licensed mediator on managing personal relationships in relation to the law. Week two: Students will read fiction and non-fiction in French about the influence of media technologies on personal relationships. They will record reflections in French on their own personal relationships and lifestyles, including how media technologies play a role in both. Week Three: Students will work in groups to write short plays demonstrating something they have learned about social media technologies and their impacts on human relationships and lifestyles. On the last day of the week, they will perform them for their classmates who will write short reflections on how the performances relate to what they have learned.
Transportation Technologies 2 weeksExamine the history of transportation technologies such as the airplane, the car, the metro, and the train and discover Francophone transportation technology firms in the Research Triangle. Week one: Students will complete textbook activities introducing vocabulary on travel, transportation, and the postal service and the grammar of relative pronouns and the future verb tense. A presenter from Lord Corp. will present the history, current state, and future prospects for helicopter stabilization systems in French. Week two: Students will read Petites Histoires de Transports and choose a transportation (plane, train, metro, car, bicycle, motorcycle) about which they will research the history, the technological evolution, and possible future uses. At the end of the week, they will do a presentation on their findings.
Personal Health & Medical Technologies 3 weeksDiscuss personal health, differentiate between the healthcare systems in France and the United States, explore the latest research in biomedical and pharmaceutical engineering at NCSU by French researchers. Week one: Students will complete textbook activities introducing vocabulary on health, body parts, animal health, and body care routines and the grammar of reflexive verbs and the subjunctive mood. A presenter from NCSU will present and discuss the basics of bioinformatics and his research in French. Week Two: A presenter from Biomerieux, a pharmaceutical firm, will discuss pharmaceutical technologies in French. Students will do research on other Francophone medical technology firms in the research triangle and record reflections on which firm would suit their personal talents and interests. Students will read about the French health care system as compared to the American health care system. When presented with a series of medical situations they will decide in which ones they would prefer to be in France ot the US and explain why. Week three: A presenter from NCSU will present and discuss the basics of ultrasound technology and lab culture in France. Students will tour a lab at NCSU and ask questions in French to a French graduate student about differences in French and American lab culture from her perspective. Students will write reflections on which kind of environment they would prefer to work in.
Environment & Society2 weeksDefine the major environmental challenges in France in the 21st century, assess the EU's most recent plans to manage these challenges, and distinguish between French and American approaches to the environment after a discussion with an environmental journalist. Week one: Students will complete textbook activities introducing vocabulary on global environmental and policy challenges and the grammar of the subjunctive mood. Each day students will consult the Internet for articles on major international challenges and present them in a discussion forum on Moodle. Week two: An environmental journalist will discuss differences in approaches to environmental challenges from the French and American perspectives. Students will discuss in small groups the role culture plays in creating international environmental policy and debate the pros and cons of the French versus the American perspectives. Then they will discuss in groups and write individual reflections on whether and how the articles they read in the previous week reflect these cultural differences.

dmm (Mon, 11 Apr 2016 13:39:51 GMT): Rollback: The 15 week topics outline needs to be made more specific to show the class activities week by week.
Key: 5740