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Viewing: FLG 320 : Introduction to German Literature

Last approved: Thu, 12 Apr 2018 17:31:39 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 19 Mar 2018 15:20:08 GMT

Change Type
Major
FLG (Foreign Language - German)
320
023171
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Introduction to German Literature
Intro German Lit
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Foreign Languages & Literature (16FL)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Ruth Gross
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture2525NoMajors, Minors, and interested students who can handle German.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement at 300 level.

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16FLGBAGerman StudiesRequired
16FLGINT German Studies and International EconomicsRequired
16FLGSCI German Studies Science and TechnologyRequired
16FLLGERForeign Languages and Literatures, German Studies ConcRequired
16FLLGIEForeign Languages and Literatures, German Studies Intl Econ ConcRequired
16FLLGSCIForeign Languages and Literatures, German Studies Intl Econ ConcRequired
An introduction to reading and analyzing German, Austrian, and Swiss literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. Discussion of various genres (short story, novel, drama, poetry) formal aspects, literary periods, and a variety of critical approaches. Lectures and much discussion. Oral and written assignments.

GEP review: HUM (GK reviewed in 8/2012)


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Analyze literary texts from various genres and periods and explain how they reflect the human experience typical of their cultural and historical contexts.
 
 
Midterm and Final Exams.
Question from Exam: Many of the works we have read this semester touch upon the idea of guilt and responsibility—and it is often not so clear-cut as to who or what is ultimately responsible for a particular downfall or event. Personal responsibility and guilt, although seemingly apparent, can be results of other factors. Discuss this idea starting with "The Visit" and compare it to at least two other works we have read in the class. Make sure you write an organized essay using specific examples from the works you chose to support your arguments and ideas.
 
 
Apply the methods of literary analysis and discuss, in speaking and writing in the foreign language, various interpretations of a given text.
 
 
Classwork and graded assessment of contributions to discussions. Worksheets that students complete which they may use as a basis for discussion.
Sample question relating to Lessing's fables: What interpretations of Lessing's fable from 1757 do you consider to be relevant to our modern society? Please explain.
 
 
Organize and write essays of literary criticism, supporting arguments with appropriate quotations from the primary texts and secondary sources.
 
 
Writing assignments that relate to the different texts. Here is a prompt for the Naturalist work "Lineman Thiel" by Gerhart Hauptmann: Hauptmann's narrative shows an individual caught between colliding powers and values - natural vs. industrialized landscapes; religion vs. fate; drives vs. satisfaction with status quo, etc. Discuss the narrative in this context, also considering contemporary theories about geographical, historical, and social environments.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Examine and describe how the literary works under discussion reflect and contest ideas and values from a specific historical context in German, Austrian or Swiss society.
 
 
Midterm and Final exams, as well as papers on various literary topics written in German about the German-speaking cultures. Exam question: Dürrenmatt specifically wrote that his play is not meant to be historical or confined to a specific location. Claire is simply “the richest woman in the world.” What he wanted to achieve was a kind of “Everyman Effect.” The setting is always therefore “Gegenwart”—the present. Imagine that you are a director and have been asked to stage "The Visit" for a local theatre. In an organized essay, explain how you would stage it, what changes you might make in the costumes, sets, allusions to politics, etc. to make the play meaningful today. Give specific examples and reasons why you would make these changes.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Describe how societal values such as integrity, responsibility and guilt are represented in literary texts from Germany, Austria and Switzerland and compare them to their place in the different societal and political context of the USA.
 
 
Classwork and graded assessment of contributions to discussions. Worksheets that students complete which they may use as a basis for discussion.
Question on worksheet: Compare one or two of the fairy tales that we read in the Brothers Grimm versions with versions of these fairy tales in Disney and even more contemporary films you have seen. What do these differences illustrate about the society and age in which they were first written?
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
NA
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement at 300 level.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
High intermediate knowledge of German.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, Fables.
Immanuel Kant, "What is Enlightenment"
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Excerpts from "Faust", various poems.
Friedrich Schiller, various poems.
H. v. Kleist, "Anecdote from the Prussian War" "The Beggarwoman of Locarno"
Georg Buchner, "Woyzeck"
Georg Hauptmann, "Lineman Thiel"
Bertolt Brecht, "Measures Taken Against Violence"
F. Durrenmatt, "The Visit of the Old Lady"
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Socio-cultural epochs of Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, Classicism, Romanticism, Naturalism, Modernism in the German-Speaking Cultures.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
None.
Tenured faculty member teaches this course as part of her regular teaching obligations.



1. understand and engage in the human experience through the interpretation of literature; and

2. become aware of the act of interpretation itself as a critical form of knowing in the study of literature; and

3. make scholarly arguments about literature using reasons and ways of supporting those reasons that are appropriate to the field of study.

 


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, you should be able to:

1. Analyze literary texts from various genres and periods and explain how they reflect the human experience typical of their cultural and historical contexts.

2. Apply the methods of literary analysis and discuss, in speaking and writing in the foreign language, various interpretations of a given text.

3. Organize and write essays of literary criticism, supporting arguments with appropriate quotations from the primary texts and secondary sources.

4. Examine and describe how the literary works under discussion reflect and contest ideas and values from a specific historical context in German, Austrian or Swiss society.

5. Describe how societal values such as integrity, responsibility and guilt are represented in literary texts from Germany, Austria and Switzerland and compare them to their place in the different societal and political context of the USA.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Project10%Group project
Discussion10%This includes a student's discussion leadership on one of the works read during the semester. The rest of this particular grade is based on her/his active participation in class discussions.
Written Assignment20%Response papers and journals.
Essay30%Three short formal papers.
Midterm15%Identifications of reading texts. Essay questions.
Final Exam15%Identifications of reading texts. Essay questions.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction to Analyzing Literature2 classesLecture
The Enlightenment7 classesReadings, Lectures, Discussions, Partnerwork
Storm and Stress1 classReadings, Lecture, Discussion
Romanticism5 classesReadings, Lecture, Discussion, Partnerwork
Politics in the 19th century3 classesReadings, Lectures, Discussion, Film
Naturalism and the Industrial Revolution4 classesReadings, Lectures, Discussion
Modernism 2 classesReadings, Lectures, Discussion, Partnerwork
Twentieth Century Literature4 classesReadings, Lectures, Film, Partnerwork

hziglar (Tue, 02 Jan 2018 14:03:16 GMT): Rollback: by request of Dr. Marchi for additional review of GEP materials
Key: 5744