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Viewing: ANT 483/ANT 583 : Theories of Archaeological Research

Last approved: Thu, 09 Feb 2017 09:01:33 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 09 Feb 2017 09:01:33 GMT

Change Type
Major
ANT (Anthropology)
483
024340
Dual-Level Course
Yes
583
Cross-listed Course
No
Theories of Archaeological Research
Theory of Archeology
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Sociology (16SOC)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Even Years
Summer 1 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
John Millhauser
Assistant Professor
Assoc

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3030Non/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: ANT 251 or 253 and 3 cred 300-level ANT
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16anthbaAnthropologyRequired
Covers the theories that inform archaeological research in the effort to locate and interpret material evidence about past human activities. Topics include the history of archaeology, theories of archaeological practice and interpretation, ethics, and working with stakeholders. Relies on case studies and major syntheses and critiques of current theoretical debates. Cases focus on the origins of social complexity, human-environmental interactions, and critical perspectives on inequality, race, class, gender, and ethnicity. Students may not receive credit for both ANT 483 and ANT 583.

Title: This course is one of the options for the theory requirement for Anthropology, but the course title creates confusion for students about whether this fits theory or methods.  The course is not a research methods course, so we thought a title change would make it more clear.

Catalog Description: Changes made to the catalog description to better describe the course as currently taught.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

We expect Dr. Millhauser to teach this course every other fall as part of his regular teaching load.

This course is built on the premise that every archaeologist "does theory" whether they like or not, whether they are explicit about it or not. Our course objectives are to learn about the theories that inform archaeological research. This take three forms: First, we will cover theories about what constitutes archaeological data and what kinds of evidence and arguments archaeologists accept as valid. Second, we will cover theories about what human culture is, its change over time, and what kinds of questions archaeologists can ask based on the data available to them. Third, we will cover theories about how archaeological research influences the contemporary world, our responsibility to engage with different groups, and how basic and scientific research interact with one another. Students will learn about all three through readings, discussions, and first-hand research experiences.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the class, students will be able to:

1. Argue the relevance of archaeological research to topics concerning human welfare (environmental degradation and sustainability, social inequality, gender and race relations, & nationalism to name a few)

2. Evaluate an archaeological study in terms of its research design, theoretical approach, and internal logic

3. Analyze the ethical implications of conducting archaeological research and the issues surrounding the preservation, interpretation, and “ownership” of archaeological remains

4. Communicate all of the above to professional audiences in oral and written form.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation10%Discussion based course, requires active participation from students. See syllabus.
Readings20%Once a week, students will be responsible for posting reading responses on Moodle prior to class (by 9am) on the day that we will cover those readings.
Discussion10%Co-facilitation of discussion - Twice during the semester, each student will be responsible for helping to co-facilitate class discussion. See syllabus.
Exam25%Midterm take-home exams based on readings.
Final Exam35%Readings-based essay exam.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached syllabus
ADDITIONAL WORK FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
Reading responses: Graduate students will be expected to post responses twice a week (on all readings). These responses are described in the syllabus and will count for the 20% "Reading" grade above.
NSF Research proposal: Graduate students will write a 15-page NSF DDIG (Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant) proposal on the archaeological topic of their choice. This will count for 20% of the final grade (the midterm and final exam will each count for 20% of the final grade for graduate students). CIM does not make it easy for me to show how these grades work for undergraduates and graduates. Sorry.

mlnosbis 11/16/2016: No overlapping courses.

ghodge 11/16/2016 Edit 'course objectives/goals' as written these are 'student learning outcomes';
Is student learning outcome "Develop a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship proposal for grad students only? If so, then please indicate here and on syllabus. Any additional outcomes for grad students? No student evaluation methods shown for grad students. No weight shown for the hour discussion session or the proposal. This should also be clarified in the syllabus. Syllabus should make clear that grad students can not take course S/U. Syllabus 'course structure' does not describe the extra sessions for graduate students. Syllabus must address both grad and undergrad students.

ghodge 11/22/2016 Ready for ABGS reviewers.

ABGS Reviewer comments:
-No concerns or suggestions.
despain (Tue, 20 Sep 2016 21:21:17 GMT): Rollback: NQR
aeherget (Mon, 07 Nov 2016 20:42:33 GMT): AECHH: Uploading syllabus at instructor's request via email 11/3/2016.
jkmillha (Fri, 18 Nov 2016 15:58:44 GMT): I have uploaded a new syllabus with the requested changes. Below, I quote the comments from reviewer ghodge and my responses: "ghodge 11/16/2016 Edit 'course objectives/goals' as written these are 'student learning outcomes'" -- I have changed the "course objectives/goals" on CIM so they do not duplicate the outcomes. I have added the heading "course objectives/goals" to the syllabus with the appropriate text. "Is student learning outcome 'Develop a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship proposal for grad students only?' If so, then please indicate here and on syllabus." -- I have removed the NSF grant from the outcomes on CIM entirely to reflect the syllabus. Any additional outcomes for grad students? -- No. The graduate students have the same outcomes. No student evaluation methods shown for grad students. No weight shown for the hour discussion session or the proposal. This should also be clarified in the syllabus. -- Graduate students do not meet for an extra hour, they have to post responses to all of the readings online (undergrads only post on half of the readings). I have made this change to CIM. I have clarified the proportion of the final grade derived from the NSF proposal. Student evaluation methods for graduate and undergraduate students are now separated on the syllabus (pp 4 to 6 on syllabus). CIM does not give me the option to split undergraduate and graduate evaluation methods, so only the undergraduate methods are stipulated on CIM. Syllabus should make clear that grad students can not take course S/U. -- Done (page 7 of syllabus) Syllabus 'course structure' does not describe the extra sessions for graduate students. -- See above. Grad students have additional posts online, no extra sessions. Syllabus must address both grad and undergrad students. -- Unless you provide me with additional specific ways in which the syllabus needs to address both kinds of students, then I will assume that making these changes satisfies that comment.
jkmillha (Fri, 18 Nov 2016 16:01:48 GMT): The CIM system took all of my formatting and lumped it into one paragraph. Here is the same paragraph, with better formatting. jkmillha (11/18/16 10:58 am): I have uploaded a new syllabus with the requested changes. Below, I quote the comments from reviewer ghodge and my responses: (1) "ghodge 11/16/2016 Edit 'course objectives/goals' as written these are 'student learning outcomes'" -- I have changed the 'course objectives/goals' on CIM so they do not duplicate the outcomes. I have added the heading 'course objectives/goals' to the syllabus with the appropriate text. (2) "Is student learning outcome 'Develop a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship proposal for grad students only?' If so, then please indicate here and on syllabus." -- I have removed the NSF grant from the outcomes on CIM entirely to reflect the syllabus. (3) "Any additional outcomes for grad students?" -- No. The graduate students have the same outcomes. If you expect that graduate students should have different outcomes, then please make this clear. (4) "No student evaluation methods shown for grad students. No weight shown for the hour discussion session or the proposal. This should also be clarified in the syllabus." -- Graduate students do not meet for an extra hour, they have to post responses to all of the readings online (undergrads only post on half of the readings). I have made this change to CIM. I have clarified the proportion of the final grade derived from the NSF proposal. Student evaluation methods for graduate and undergraduate students are now separated on the syllabus (pp 4 to 6 on syllabus). CIM does not give me the option to split undergraduate and graduate evaluation methods, so only the undergraduate methods are stipulated on CIM. (5) "Syllabus should make clear that grad students can not take course S/U." -- Done (page 7 of syllabus). (6) "Syllabus 'course structure' does not describe the extra sessions for graduate students." -- See above. Grad students have additional posts online, no extra sessions. (7) "Syllabus must address both grad and undergrad students." -- Unless you provide me with additional specific ways in which the syllabus needs to address both kinds of students, then I will assume that making these changes satisfies that comment.
Key: 6128