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Viewing: WGS 370 : Advanced Studies of Gender in Science

Last approved: Thu, 04 Jun 2015 08:21:02 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 16 Apr 2015 19:53:29 GMT

Change Type
WGS (Women's and Gender Studies)
370
032059
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Advanced Studies of Gender in Science
Advanced Gender in Science
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Interdisciplinary Studies (16IDS)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Mary Wyer
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture2525Non/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisites: WGS 200 or (WGS 210 or STS 210)
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth view of recent research about the influence of contemporary gender relations on science and engineering. Readings address feminist theories about sex/gender, race/class/sexualities, the social construction of science, and technological innovation. Discussions will focus on scholarship that explores how, why, and when a "gender lens" brings value to understanding nature and knowledge.

Justification: In 2014, the UCCC approved two new WGS courses: WGS 370, Advanced Studies in Gender and Science, and WGS 300, Introduction to Feminist Theories. Both were approved as once-a-year Fall semester offerings. This makes sense for WGS 300, as it is a required course for majors and needs to be offered in the Fall prior to students taking the capstone course, WGS 492, which is only offered in the Spring. However, in order to balance our 300-level offerings across the academic year and to increase enrollments in WGS 370, we would like offer WGS 370 in the Spring semester. Thus, we are asking that the existing schedule offering WGS 370 in the Fall be shifted to the Spring.

• Consultation: This change would not impact any other departments or programs.

• Proposed effective date: Fall 2015


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
1. Summarize similarities and differences in major perspectives on diversity in science and engineering from the humanities, social sciences and STEM fields
 
 
The course is organized into three sections, each reflecting one of the interdisciplinary objectives. For Objective #1, in-class essay exam #1 includes questions that specifically ask students to contrast two articles, each from a different disciplinary perspective, in relation to how/why diversity in the scientific and technological workforce is (or is not) important.
 
 
Describe critiques of major perspectives from within theory and research about sex/gender
 
 
In-class essay exam for the second section of the course addresses objective #2 by including a question that specifically asks students to articulate, link and critique major perspectives on sex/gender in relation to a single topic across 2-3 articles in that section.
 
 
Evaluate strengths and limitations of the critiques of major perspectives
 
 
The third section of the course addresses objective #3 by including a final exam question that asks students to distill and then evaluate the limitations and strengths of critiques of major perspectives as described in the third section readings.
 
 
An interdisciplinary overview is provided by theory and research on gender in science, including the psychosocial dynamics of inequality, the social construction of knowledge, intersectional theory regarding race, gender, class, ethnicity and religion, and empiricist feminist perspectives.
 
 
Objectives will be met by providing students with reading materials, discussion topics, and exam questions that routinely and repeatedly ask them to describe specific studies, outline key theories, and offer distilled perspectives on course themes.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
n/a
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
Yes.
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Pre-requisite: WGS 200 OR WGS 210 OR STS 210
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See syllabus attached
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus attached
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
See syllabus attached
This course will be taught as one of the WGS courses that Dr. Wyer teaches In regular
rotation. Dr.Wyer has a teaching obligation to WGS of one course per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Course Learning Outcomes


By the end of the semester students will have learned to:



  • Identify gender relations as embedded in scientific and technological fields

  • Summarize major perspectives on diversity in science and engineering

  • Describe critiques of major perspectives from within theory and research about sex/gender

  • Evaluate strengths and limitations of critiques of these perspectives

  • Discuss and debate feminist approaches that inform teaching and research


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation25%Attendance and Participation: Students are allowed 2 unexcused absences; each absence over that number will be counted as -1% of attendance/participation grade.
Multiple exams75%3 exams; each exam is 25% each.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Session 1 Why Diversity Matters: Overview and DataWeek 1Why Diversity Matters

General introduction and overview to the course
The national data on diversity In S&E fields
Session 2 Why Diversity Matters: Historical EvidenceWeek 2 Why Diversity Matters

Lost History

Jennifer Light (2009).When computers were women.In Women In Engineering: Pioneers and Trailblazers, ed.

Margaret Layne. 179-210.Reston,VA,American Society for Civil Engineers.
Session 3 Why Diversity Matters: Scientific and Epistemelogical IssuesWeek 3Why Diversity Matters

Whose Science,Whose Knowledge?

Londa Schieblnger (2007).Getting more women Into science:Knowledge issues.Harvard Journal of Law
and Gender 30,365-378.

Professional Advancement:New Barriers

Sue Rosser (2012).The gender gap in patents.In Breaking into the Lab: Engineering Progress for Women in Science, lSQ-177. New York,New York University Press.
Session 4 Social Construction of KnowledgeWeek 4Social Construction of Knowledge
Language Matters - 1

Wayne,Marta (2000).Walking a tightrope:The feminist life of a drosophila biologist. NWSA Journal,
12,no.3, 139-150.

Language Matters- 2

Cohn,carol(1987).Sex and death in the rational world of defense Intellectuals,Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 12,no.4,687-718.
Session 5 Social Construction of KnowledgeWeek 5Social Construction of Knowledge

Constructing Difference

Milam,Erica L.(2012).Making males aggressive and females coy:Gender across the animal-human boundary.

SIGNS: Journal of Women In Culture and Society 37,935-959.

Constructing Women

Jennifer Aengst and Unda L.Layne (2010).The need to bleed? A feminist technology assessment of menstrual suppressing birth control pills.

In Feminist Technology,ed.Unda Layne,Sharra Vostral,and Kate Boyer, pp.55-88.Chicago,University of Illinois Press.

Session 6 EvaluationWeek 6Overview and Review for Exam #1

ln class Exam #1
Session 7 Social Construction of Knowledge -- Asking Different QuestionsWeek 7Social Construction of Knowledge

Asking Different Questions

Chikako Takeshita (2011)."Keep life simple":Body/technology relationships In racialized
global contexts.

In The global biopolltics of the IUD: How science constructs contraceptive users and women's bodies,
pp.137-162.Boston,MIT Press.

Questions for Natural Scientists

Deboleena Roy (2008).Asking different questions:Feminist practices for the natural sciences. Hypatia 23,134- 157.
Session 8 Social Construction of Knowledge: What is a feminist technology?Week 8Social Construction of Knowledge

What is a feminist technology?

Deborah G.Johnson (2010). Sorting out the question of feminist technology.

In Feminist Technology, ed. Unda Layne,Sharra Vostral,and Kate Boyer,pp.36-54.Chicago,University of Illinois Press.


Rebecca M.Jordan-Young and Raffaella I.Rumiati(2012). Hardwired for Sexism? Approaches to Sex/Gender in Neuroscience.

In Neurofemlnlsm: Issues at the intersection of feminist theory and cognitive
science. Baslngstoke,Hampshire,GBR:Palgrave Macmillan.105-120.

Session 9 Social Construction of KnowledgeWeek 9Social Construction of Knowledge

The Master Molecule

Ruth Hubbard (2003).Science,power,gender:How DNA became the book of life.SIGNS: Journal of Women In
Culture and Society 28,791·799.


Chromosomes

Sarah S.Richardson (2012).Sexing the X:How the X became the "female chromosome."SIGNS: Journal of
Women in Culture and Society 37,909-933.
Session 10 Social Construction of KnowledgeWeek 10Social Construction of Knowledge

Sex Selection

Rajani Bhatia (2010).Constructing gender from inside out:Sex selection practices In the United
States.Feminist Studies 36,260 292.

Bones

Fausto Sterllng, Anne (2005).The Bare Bones of Sex:Part 1 Sex and Gender.Signs: Journal of
Women In Culture & Society,30,no. 2,1491 1527.
Session 11 Social Construction of Knowledge: Genetic TechnologiesWeek 11Social Construction of Knowledge

Genetic Technologies

Dorothy E.Roberts (2009).Race,gender,and genetic technologies:A new reproductive dystopia?

SIGNS: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 34,784-804.

Overview and review for Exam 1#2
Session 12 Evaluation and Begin next unitWeek 12In-class Exam #2


Identifying Theoretical Strengths and Limitations

Technological empowerment 1

Jesse Daniels (2009).Rethinking cyberfeminism(s):Race,gender,and embodiment.

Women's Studies
Quarterly 37,101-124.

Session 13 Identifying Theoretical Strengths and LimitationsWeek 13Identifying Theoretical Strengths and Limitations

Technological empowerment 2

Virginia Eubanks (2012).Technologies of Citizenship.Chapter 5 In her Digital Dead End: Fighting for Social Justice is the Information Age. 82-98. cambridge,MA: MIT Press

Facts and truths as social knowledge

Donna Haraway (1991).Situated knowledges: The science question In feminism and the privilege of
partial perspective.

In Simians,Cyborgs,and Women: The Reinvention of Nature,183-201.New York,
Routledge.

Session 14 Identifying Theoretical Strengths and Limitations: Begin Student PresentationsWeek 14Identifying Theoretical Strengths and Limitations

Animals and Humans

Lynda Blrke,Mette Bryld,& Nina Lykke (2004). Animal performances: An exploration of Intersections between feminist science studies and studies of human/animal relationships.Feminist Theory S,167-18

Student Presentations
Session 15 Identifying Theoretical Strengths and Limitations: Student PresentationsWeek 15Identifying Theoretical Strengths and Limitations

Student Presentations.Readings and topics to come.
Session 16 -- Final ExamWeek 16Final Exam
Course update for archive. Reviewed by GMN 2.2.2015.

• Revision being proposed: Change scheduling from Fall, Every Year to Spring, Every Year.
• Justification: In 2014, the UCCC approved two new WGS courses: WGS 370, Advanced Studies in Gender and Science, and WGS 300, Introduction to Feminist Theories. Both were approved as once-a-year Fall semester offerings. This makes sense for WGS 300, as it is a required course for majors and needs to be offered in the Fall prior to students taking the capstone course, WGS 492, which is only offered in the Spring. However, in order to balance our 300-level offerings across the academic year and to increase enrollments in WGS 370, we would like offer WGS 370 in the Spring semester. Thus, we are asking that the existing schedule offering WGS 370 in the Fall be shifted to the Spring.
• Consultation: This change would not impact any other departments or programs.
• Proposed effective date: Fall 2015
n51ls801 (Mon, 30 Mar 2015 22:38:50 GMT): I would suggest that rather than presenting the schedule in this rather unusual way, a weekly schedule be given (for this or any other course). This way of presenting work done in a course might make it appear to to someone not well-informed about academic scheduling that for example an instructor in a TuTh course with 32 sessions does only two thirds as much as work as a MWF course with 48 sessions. Standardizing on a weekly schedule makes it clearer that irrespective of the finer grain of the course's schedule, instructors offering such courses do the same amount of work. This is not in any way a criticism of this course or of its admirably detailed schedule, but a suggestion occasioned by this submission of a possibly useful general practice.
gmneugeb (Thu, 16 Apr 2015 19:52:16 GMT): Approving for CUE: Changes not significant enough to affect GEP status. Action was already reviewed for IP 09/2014.
gmneugeb (Thu, 16 Apr 2015 19:53:29 GMT): Approving for CUE: Changes not significant enough to affect GEP status. Action was already reviewed for IP 09/2014.
Key: 6433