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Viewing: ZO 233 : Human-Animal Interactions

Last approved: Fri, 04 Nov 2016 08:01:07 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 11 Oct 2016 18:40:12 GMT

Formerly Known As: BIO 233


Change Type
Minor
ZO (Zoology)
233
031445
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Human-Animal Interactions
Human-Animal Interactions
College of Sciences
Biological Sciences (17BSC)
Term Offering
Fall and Summer
Offered Every Year
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Online (Internet)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture0.0
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC8080NoSummer II - 50 per semester

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This course is designed to explore the relationship humans share with other animals and nature. We will study the early history of animal domestication and the influence of animals on human culture and religion. We will also explore our relationships to animals as pets, food, research subjects, and wildlife. All subjects will be covered through interaction with quest speaker, assigned readings, case studies, and class discussion.

No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
1. Distinguish between the distinct approaches of two or more disciplines.
* be able to distinguish between the animal rights and the animal welfare view of using animals
for food, companionship, and as research subjects.
* understand the views of the dominant eastern and western religions with respect to the human-
animal relationship as discussed in religious texts.
* evaluate the conflict that arises from the expansion of human development at the expense of
reduction of wildlife habitat as they encounter specific examples.
2. Identify and apply authentic connections between two or more disciplines.
Upon completion of this course, students will:
* better understand and apply their personal set of ethical beliefs to the use and treatment of
animals in general.
* know what international treaties along with national, state and local laws regulate how animals
are managed, owned, or used in all capacities.
* demonstrate a working knowledge of how personal experience, culture, and religion shape their
own views of the human-animal relationship.
3. Explore and synthesize the approaches or views of the two or more disciplines.
Upon completion of this course, students will:
* have met with other faculty and animal management professionals to discuss how their
knowledge, skills, and views on the human-animal relationship have developed as a result of
their career experiences.
* have engaged in significant personal reflection on issues of ethics, law, culture and religion
where relevant to analyze specific case studies
(examples below)
* Should horse slaughter for commercial purposes be legal?
* How has Disney shaped our children views of nature?
* How do we assess "pain and distress" across a variety of animal species?

 
 
1. Students will write in class reflective essays (topics provided) that synthesize reading, class discussion,
and speaker presentations in order to demonstrate newly acquired knowledge of the current topic.
2. Students will regularly work together in small groups on problems-based discussions in order to
synthesize their newly sharpened views and respectfully acknowledge the views of others.
3. Students will engage in one large group project where they will choose a topic of interest that
addresses a locally problematic human-animal interaction. They must research the topic
thoroughly, identify key questions to be addressed in an effort to manage the problem and
present their findings and suggestions to the group. Examples of past projects include:
* How well does RDU manage threats form bird and mammal strikes?
* How should NC manage its feral horse populations?
* How should NC balance sea turtle nesting needs and the desires of local recreational fishermen
to drive on the beach?
* Urban backyard chickens - just a fad or a long-term trend?
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
The Animals Reader - Linda Kalof and Amy Fitzgerald
E Reserves readings
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 



Student Learning Outcomes

Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation100Participation in this class is essential - 100 point scale:
Attendance, Motivation, Level of involvement, Preparedness, and Respect.
Project100You will complete a group project.
Quizzes100Assignments and Quizzes
Written AssignmentBoth Oral and written assignments and quizzes will be given throughout the course. Assignments may be web based, in class, or take home. You will be graded on the quality and effort applied to your work. One hundred points will be derived from this category.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction to the course2We will explore the boundaries that separate humans from other species
Wild - Tame - Domesticated - Feral2Examining the relationships among the 4 state in which animals exist.
Domestication - History and Biology 2Human-animal interactions prior to domestication, the domestication process, and the history of domestication for selected vertebrate and non-vertebrate species.
Animal Ethics and Law2Animal Ethics - Definitions and terms
History and current status of animal ethics
Animal Law:
Animal Welfare Act; Fed, State, and Local Law
Case Study: Michael Vick
Animals as Food2Current production practice in US
Fish - our main "bushmeat"
Case Study: Who defines animal friendly labels and what do they really mean?
Animals as food in non-western cultures
Animals as Pets2History
Pets are property
Leash and pooper scooper laws
Health benefits to pets and people
Pet overpopulation and shelters
Hoarding, neglect and abuse
Dog bites
Animals as Partners2Animals in sport
Animals with jobs
Animals in Research2History of their use
Current alternative testing methods
What makes a good research model?
Animals in Culture2Biophilia - do we have an innate love of animals and nature?
Disney - a tale of neoteny, inaccuracy, and commercialism.
Why and how do we label animals?
Animals in Religion2Major roles in western and eastern religions
Case Study: Vegetarianism and world religions
Animals as Neighbors2Living with wildlife
Nuisance animals
Animals in zoos
Aggression and competition
Anthropozoonoses
Animals as Agents of Biodiversity2Global biodiversity crisis
Case Study: Worldwide amphibian declines or decline of songbird popns in US

aeherget (Tue, 11 Oct 2016 18:40:12 GMT): AECHH: See attachment for college approval. 10/11/2016
Key: 6480