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Viewing: ENG 364/COM 364 : History of Film to 1940

Last approved: Wed, 23 Mar 2016 14:48:02 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 23 Mar 2016 14:48:02 GMT

Change Type
ENG (English)
364
003876
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
Yes
Course Prefix:
COM
History of Film to 1940
HI of Film to 1940
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Marsha Gordon
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LectureN/AN/ANoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Technological developments and aesthetic movements that shaped international cinema production from the beginning of the industry to 1940. Formal evolution in camera movement, editing, sound, narrative form, and the documentary. The rise to prominence of Hollywood and international cinemas in historical, economic, and cultural contexts.

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No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Visual & Performing Arts
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Explain aesthetic, cultural and historical dimensions of film history prior to 1940.
 
 
Sample exam question: Discuss the visual and narrative techniques at work in The Only Son (Yasujiro Ozu. 1936). How does Ozu approach camera placement. framing, and editing (specifically note two formal devices that are unique to Ozu)? How does the film differ-in form. style, and narrative- from the kinds of films being made in Hollywood in the 1930s (use one 1930s American film to make these points)?
 
 
Interpret and make critical judgments about film history prior to 1940 through an analysis of structure, form and style of specific films.
 
 
Sample exam question: Using The Arrival of a Train (Lumieres, 1895), The Kiss in the Tunnel (G. A. Smith, 1899). and A Trip to the Moon (Melies, 1902), explain what each film reveals about the evolving nature of film making during cinema's first decade, especially in relation to narrative and editing practices. Be sure to note the structural and stylistic advances evident in each film.
 
 
Evaluate films produced prior to 1940 based upon techniques and standards appropriate to the discipline of film studies.
 
 
Sample exam question: Discuss some of the different ways in which the following films build tension and suspense: The Great Train Robhe1y (Edison/Potter, 1903), M (fritz Lang, 1931), and The 39 Steps (Alfred Hitchcock, 1935). What techniques-both .formal and narrative- do these respective directors use to create suspense? Be sure to use specific examples from each film.
Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Identify and explain the importance of films produced outside the United States from the 1890s to 1940.
 
 
Sample Exam Question: How do you understand the relationship between the choices in subject matter, narrative structure, editing, and visual style in Un Chien Andalou (Luis Bunuel and Salvador Dali, France, 1928) and Strike (Sergei Eisenstein, Soviet Union, 1925) in relation to the films being produced in Hollywood during the same time period? In what ways do these films represent the differing goals/theories of their respective movements and why are they important to those movements? You will need to pay attention to technology, form, style, genre, and industry practices in the course of your response.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Compare and contrast film technology, form, style, genre, and industry practices prior to 1940 through analysis of a variety of national cinemas, including French, German, British, Italian, Soviet, Japanese and American.
 
 
Sample Exam Question: Discuss the visual and narrative techniques at work in the Japanese film The Only Son (Yasujiro Ozu, 1936). How does Ozu approach camera placement, framing, and editing (specifically note two formal devices that are unique to Ozu)? How does this Japanese film differ- in form as well as narrative-from the kinds of films being made in Hollywood in the 1930s (use one 1930s American film to make these points)?
 
 
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US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
Yes.
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Readings for this course are available to students on "e-reserve": https:/ /reserves.lib.ncsu.edu/ which students can log on to under "my course reserves." These readings include:

Breton, Andre. The Surrealist Manifesto. Translated by Patrick Waldberg. McGraw-Hill, 1971. 66-75.

Doherty, Thomas. "Criminal Codes." Pre-Code Hollywood: Sex, Immorality and Insurrection in American Cinema,
1930-1934. Columbia UP, 1999. 137-170.

Gunning, Tom. ''The Cinema of Attraction: Early Film, Its Spectator, and the Avant-Garde." Film and Theory: An
Anthology. Eds. Robert Starn & Toby Miller. Blackwell, 2000. 229-235.

Peterson, Jennifer. "Glimpses of Animal Life: Nature Films and the Emergence of Classroom Cinema." Learning
with the Lights off: Educational Film in the United States. Eds. Devin Orgeron, Marsha Orgeron, and Dan
Streible. Oxford, 2012. 145-167.

Vertov, Dzinga. ''The Factory of Facts and Other Writings." October 7 (1978): 109-128.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See topical outline below.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
None
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Student Learning Outcomes

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Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
OtherN/AN/A
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction to Film History1 classScreening: Edison Co.: Sandow (The Strong Man) (1894); Barber Shop (1893)

Annabelle Butterfly Dance (1894); Corbett and Courtney Before the Kinetograph (1894)

The Invention of Cinema: USA, France, England
The Invention of Cinema: USA, France, England1 classReading: Tom Gunning, "The Cinema of Attractions"
Screening: Edison Co.: Cockfight (1894); Annie Oakley (1894); The Kiss (1896); Interrupted Lovers (1896); Going to the Fire (1896)
Lumiere Brothers (1895-1897): Leaving the Factory; The Baby's Meal; The Sprinkler Sprinkled; Arrival of a Train; Niagara Falls; Swimming in the Sea; Promenade of Ostriches; Childish Quarrel; Photograph; Transformation by Hats

Birt Acres: Rough Sea at Dover (1895)

Actualities: President McKinley at Home (1896)
The Invention of Cinema: USA, France, England1 classScreening: R.W. Paul: The Countryman & the Cinematograph (1901); A Chess Dispute (1903); Extraordinary Cab Accident (1903)
George Albert Smith: The Kiss in the Tunnel (1899); As Seen Through a Telescope (1900); Mary Jane's Mishap (1903)
Bamforth & Co.: The Kiss in the Tunnel (1899); Ladies' Skirts Nailed to a Fence (ca. 1900)
James Williamson: The Big Swallow (1901)
Cecil Hepworth: How It Feels to Be Run Over (1900); Explosion of a Motor Car (1900)
Pathe: Parle Trou De Serrue (1901); Dream and Reality (1901)
The Grammar of Narrative Cinema1 classReading: Jennifer Peterson, "Glimpses of Animal Life"
Screening: James Williamson: Fire (1901)
Georges Melies: A Trip to the Moon (1902)
Sheffield: Daring Daylight Burglary (1903)
Edison/Porter: The Great Train Robbery (1903)
The Grammar of Narrative Cinema1 classCase Study: Thomas Edison & Co.
Screening: Mr. Edison at Work in His Chemical Laboratory (1897)
Jack and the Beanstalk (1902), The Gay Shoe Clerk (1903)
Dream of a Rarebit Fiend (1906), The "Teddy" Bears (1907)
International Cinematic Developments: 1906-19121 classView Before Class: The Acrobatic Fly, Charles Urban Co., (England, 1910) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hlocZhNcOM

Reading:
"Some Tricks of the Moving Picture Maker" (1909)
"House Fly Actors Make Their Debut" (1910)
Screening: San Francisco Earthquake: Aftermath (US, 1906)
Troubles of a Grass Widower, Max Linder (France, 1908)
Nero, or the Fall of Rome, Arturo Ambrosio (Italy, 1909)
Princess Nicotine; Or, The Smoke Fairy, J. Stuart Blackton (US, 1909)
The Fly Pest (England, 1910)
International Cinematic Developments: 1906-19121 classCase Study: Alice Guy Blache
Reading: "Alice Guy Blache: A Prominent Figure in Motion Pictures" (1912)
Alice Guy Blache, "Woman's Place in Photoplay Production" (1914)
Mark Garrett Cooper, "Preface," Universal Women
Screening: Making an American Citizen (US, 1912)
Falling Leaves (US, 1912)
Matrimony's Speed Limit (US, 1913)
International Cinematic Developments: 1906-19121 classCase Study: D. W. Griffith
Reading: Janet Staiger, "Mass Produced Photoplays"
"Lessons from Lyman Howe" and "Moral Teaching by Films" (1911)
Screening: The Girl and Her Trust (1912)
The Musketeers of Pig Alley (1912)
The Birth of a Nation (1915) (excerpts)
International Cinematic Developments: 1906-19121 classView Before Class: The Temple of Moloch (1914), Thomas Edison Co. http://archive.org/details/temple _of_ moloch
Screening: How Men Propose, Lois Weber (1913)
Cabiria (1914) (excerpt), Giovanni Pastrone
The Immigrant (1917), Charlie Chaplin
Within Our Gates (1919) (excerpt), Oscar Micheaux
American Film in the 1920s1 classView Before Class: Wildlife 011 the Deserts of America's Great Southwest
(William and George Allen, 192*)
http://archive.org/details/wildlife _deserts_ americas_ southwest
Reading: Jennifer Peterson, "Glimpses of Animal Life"
Screening: One Week (1920), Buster Keaton & Edward Cline
Struggle for Existence (1925), Bray Co.
Bigelow family Kodacolor home movie (1929)
American Film in the 1920s1 classScreening: It (1927), Clarence Badger
Paper Due to Moodle Site by 8:00 a.m.
American Film in the 1920s1 classReading: "She Wants to Succeed," Motion Picture Classic (June 1926)
"Interview with Clara Bow," Motion Picture (November 1928)
"That Awful 'IT'," Photoplay (July 1930)
Screening: The Life and Death of a Hollywood Extra (1928), Vorkapich & Florey
French Cinema in the 1920s: The Avant-Garde1 classReading: Andre Breton, "The Surrealist Manifesto" (1924)
Screening: Onesime, Clock Maker, Jean Durand/Ernst Bourborn (France, 1912)
Entr'acte (1924), Rene Clair
Anemic Cinema (1926), Marcel Duchamp
Un Chien Andalou (1929), Luis Buiiuel/Salvador Dali
Soviet Cinema in the 1920s: Montage1 classScreening: Strike (1925), Sergei Eisenstein
Soviet Cinema in the 1920s: Montage1 classReading: Dziga Vertov, "The Factory of Facts and Other Writings"
Clips: Potemkin (1925), Sergei Eisenstein
Man With a Movie Camera (1929), Dziga Vertov
German Cinema in the 1920s: Expressionism1 classClips: The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920), Robert Wiene
Nosferatu (1922), F.W. Murnau
Metropolis (1927)
The Coming of Sound1 classStephen Botto more, "An International Survey of Sound Effects ... "
Clips: Dickson Experimental Sound Film (1894/S)
Cyrano de Bergerac (1900)
The Jazz Singer (1927), Alan Crosland
Sunrise (1927), F.W. Mumau
Applause (1929), Rouben Mamoulian
The Coming of Sound1 classScreening: M (1931), Fritz Lang
American Film in the 1930s-In Black & White, and Color!1 classClips: Modern Times (1936), Charlie Chaplin
American Film in the 1930s-In Black & White, and Color!
American Film in the 1930s-In Black & White, and Color!1 classScreening: I Am A Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932), Mervyn LeRoy
American Film in the 1930s-In Black & White, and Color!1 classReading: Thomas Doherty, "Criminal Codes"
Clip: Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933), Mervyn LeRoy
American Film in the 1930s-In Black & White, and Color!1 classScreening: The Wizard Of Oz (1939), Victor Fleming
American Film in the 1930s-In Black & White, and Color!1 classReading: Douglas Churchill, "Hollywood Says Oz" (Oct. 30, 1938)
Mervyn LeRoy, "Director LeRoy Explores a Myth" (Aug. 13, 1939)
Frank Nugent, Review of The Wizard ofOz (Aug. 18, 1939)
Screening: The Talio11 Punishment (1906), Pathe
Flowers and Trees (1932), Disney
International Cinema in the 1930s1 classJapan:
Screening: Hitori musuko (The 011ly So11) 1936, Yasujiro Ozu
International Cinema in the 1930s1 classFrance:
Reading: Mariana Johnson, "Schools Out"
Screening: Zero du conduite [Zero for Conduct] (1933), Jean Vigo
L 'Hippocampe ou cheval marin [The Sea Horse) (1933) Jean Painleve
International Cinema in the 1930s1 classEngland:
Screening: The 39 Steps (1935), Alfred Hitchcock
International Cinema in the 1930s1 classClips: Blackmail (1929), Alfred Hitchcock
The Lady Vanishes (1938), Alfred Hitchcock

Key: 6772