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Viewing: ENG 105 : Writing and Research in the Disciplines

Last approved: Sat, 28 Mar 2015 09:17:26 GMT

Last edit: Sat, 28 Mar 2015 09:17:26 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
ENG (English)
105
032140
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Writing and Research in the Disciplines
Writing & Research in the Disc
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Spring 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Distance Education (DELTA)
Online (Internet)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
1
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture2.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Susan Miller-Cochran
Professor of English

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC2011Yesn/a
Restricted to: Transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Examination of inquiry and writing across a range of academic disciplines, laying the foundation for further writing development in college-level writing across the curriculum. Refinement of basic principles of rhetoric and how those connect to writing in disciplinary communities. Restricted to transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course Successful completion of ENG 105 requires a grade of C- or better. Together with approved transfer credit hours, this course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

The number of transfer students to N.C. State has increased significantly in the last several years, with the University's Strategic Plan calling for deliberate expansion of transfer admissions over the next several years. The 2020 Enrollment Plan, for example, calls for a 38% increase in transfer students over the 2011 totals (http://www.provost.ncsu.edu/news/documents/2020- enrollment-plan.pdf). Transfer students coming into N.C. State, however, often have difficulty meeting the First-Year Writing (FYW) requirement for graduation because our First-Year Writing course (ENG 101) is four credit hours, while many students have only taken a three-credit-hour course at their former institutions. Students who need an additional hour of FYW credit for graduation must either:


1. take ENG 101 at N.C. State (4 credit hours)


2. take ENG 112 at a local community college and transfer it in (3 credit hours), or


3. submit a portfolio for a waiver of the FYW requirement if they meet the qualifications to submit a portfolio (the qualifications are the same for all incoming students, whether they are transfer students or incoming freshmen).


The placement requirements are available at:


http://english.chass.ncsu.edu/undergraduate/first year writing/tv writing placement.php


Of the 315 students who transferred in with 3 hours of FYW credit within the last year (2013- 2014), 69.8% (220) ultimately enrolled in English 101 at N.C. State, primarily because they had insufficient credit. The remaining ninety-five students may have fulfilled the requirement by taking another course elsewhere (most frequently ENG 112), they may have submitted a portfolio for a waiver, or they may still need to fulfill the requirement. Of the courses that students transfer in with ENG 1** credit, the majority fail to include instruction in writing in academic disciplines, a primary learning objective in our ENG 101 course. Based on this trend, we propose a one-credit-hour course specifically focused on writing in the disciplines to address this need, giving transfer students with an appropriate three-credit first-year writing course an opportunity to earn the required fourth credit and meet all learning objectives for ENG 101. Because the FYW program evaluates transfer credits on a rolling basis throughout the year, eligible transfer students would be made directly aware about taking this new course. We are proposing eight-week courses of ENG 1 05 taught online to avoid disrupting classroom scheduling. The eight-week length is also more likely to help student retention in the course, a significant concern in online learning environments.


Our goal with this course proposal is to provide an option for transfer students that will help them meet the FYW requirement in a more timely, cost-effective manner and avoid redundancy with courses that they have taken prior to coming to N.C. State.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

No new resources will be needed. If this course is implemented, current instructors of ENG 101 will teach ENG 105, and fewer sections of ENG 101 will be needed. See Rationale for estimated numbers.

Student Learning Outcomes

In English 105, students will:


1. Examine conventions of research and writing across a range of academic disciplines.


2. Refine rhetorical understanding of academic writing as generated for particular disciplinary purposes and audiences.


3. Select, analyze, and use research from multiple academic disciplines in order to examine the connection between inquiry and writing across disciplinary communities.


Together with your approved transferred writing course, completion of English 105 meets your GEP "Introduction to Writing" requirement. The required course credits in this category will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:


1. Write effectively in specific situations, which may include various academic, professional, or civic situations, and


2. Understand and respond appropriately to the critical elements that shape written communication situations, such as audience, purpose, and genre, and


3. Demonstrate critical and evaluative thinking skills in locating, analyzing, synthesizing, and using information in written communication.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Other20%As with sports or the arts, writing is primarily learned by doing, which requires active engagement. The course is also designed to be cooperative and includes a number of group activities, such as peer response and online discussions through forums. This means that your participation and preparation impacts not only your own learning, but that of your peers. We are all responsible for helping create a positive learning environment for each other. For these reasons, participation is worth 20% of your final course grade.

Your participation grade is made up of three main categories:
• The learning log (10% of grade)- See the learning log assignment sheet for information on how these will be evaluated.
• Peer response (5% of grade)- See the peer response guidelines for more on how this will work and be evaluated.
• Additional course activities and participation grade (5% of grade)- Forum posts and anything not included in the learning log or participation will count toward this category.

Much of the evaluation in the participation category emphasizes preparedness and engagement over correctness. While the major paper will undergo an extensive writing process that should lead to a polished final product, much of the work that counts toward participation is informal with your timeliness, engagement, and critical thinking mattering more than correctness.
Other20%Poster Page of Writing in a Discipline
Project60%Major Project: Comparative Rhetorical Analysis
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Deadline 1: Introductions1 classUnit 1: What are disciplines? (Weeks 1-2)

Reading: Insider's Guide (/G) section, "What are Academic Disciplines?"

Due: Forum #1: Introduction of yourself as an academic writer
Deadline 2: Disciplines as Communities1 classUnit 1: What are disciplines? (Weeks 1-2)

Reading: JG, first half of Chapter 5 "Writing in Academic Disciplines: An Introduction"

Due: Learning Log #1: Construction Zone: Disciplinary Writing.
Deadline 3: Paying Attention to Disciplinary Writing1 classUnit 1: What are disciplines? (Weeks 1-2)

Reading: JG, second half of Chapter 5 "Writing in Academic Disciplines: An Introduction"

Due: Learning Log #2: Reflection on "Insider's View" writer's profiles

Due: Sign up for a topic of interest in /G Part Ill that you will be responsible for ("Love, Marriage, and Family"; "Crime, Punishment, and Justice"; "Food, Sustainability, • and Social Class"; or "Global Climate Change & Natural Catastrophes").
Deadline 4: Thinking Rhetorically about Disciplinary Knowledge1 classUnit 1: What are disciplines? (Weeks 1-2)

Reading: Read the popular articles in your assigned Part Ill section (those not outlined in a box).

Due: Forum #2: Thinking rhetorically about translated disciplinary knowle~ge on topic of interest
Deadline 5: Writing in the Humanities1 classUnit 2: How do disciplines research and write?

Reading: /G, Chapter 6 "Reading and Writing in the Humanities" + the humanities article from the Part Ill section you signed up for. Also read the Comparative Rhetorical Analysis assignment

Due: Learning Log #3: Selecting an issue you would expect experts to contribute to.

Due: Forum #3: Analyzing scholarship in the humanities
Deadline 6: Writing in the Social Sciences1 classUnit 2: How do disciplines research and write?

Reading: /G, Chapter 7 "Reading and Writing in the Social Sciences" + the social science article from the Part Ill section you signed up for.

Due: Learning Log #4: Describing and classifying a scholarly source on your (individual) issue.

Due: Forum #4: Analyzing scholarship in the social sciences
Deadline 7: Writing in the Sciences1 classUnit 2: How do disciplines research and write?

Reading: /G, Chapter 8 "Reading and Writing in the Sciences" + the science article from the Part Ill section you signed up for. Read the "Poster page profile of writing in a discipline" assignment.

Due: Observational notes on the scholarly source you have selected, using Ch. 5 terms.

Due: Forum #5: Analyzing scholarship in the sciences
Deadline 8: Reading and Writing in the Applied Fields1 classUnit 2: How do disciplines research and write?

Reading: IG, Chapter 9 "Reading and Writing in the Applied Fields" +find and skim a scholarly or trade article from an applied field on the issue you selected.

Due: Forum #6: Analyzing scholarship in the applied fields

Due: Learning Log #5: Reflecting on where communication in article's discipline takes place and
resources/strategies writers in that discipline could use.
Deadline 9: Disciplinary Showcase1 classUnit 3: Why do differences in disciplinary writing matter?

Due: Poster page profile of writing in a discipline

Due: Forum #7: Sharing our profiles and brainstorming how other disciplines might contribute to each other's issues.
Deadline 10: Similarities and Differences across Disciplines1 classUnit 3: Why do differences in disciplinary writing matter?

Due: A source from another discipline that contributes to the same issue as your first source.

Due: Learning Log #6: Initial observations on similarities and differences in the two sources.
Deadline 11: Rhetorical Analysis Workshop1 classUnit 3: Why do differences in disciplinary writing matter?

Reading: Handout on Martha Solomon's rhetorical analysis of medical writing+ Tori Beaton's "Contraposition of Academic and Popular Rhetoric on Youth Crime" (reserves)

Due: Learning Log #7: Comparison table with reflections on inquiry so far.

Due: Learning Log #8: Using Solomon and Beaton to understand rhetorical analysis and think about the implications of our inquiry.
Deadline 12: Planning the Comparison1 classUnit 3: Why do differences in disciplinary writing matter?

Reading: "How to Write a Comparative Analysis"
(http://writinqcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/how-write-comparative-analysis)

Due: Forum #8: Working thesis and plan + peer response
Deadline 13: Writing the Comparison1 classUnit 3: Why do differences in disciplinary writing matter?

Due: Rough draft of the Comparative Rhetorical Analysis in the peer response folder

Due: Learning Log #9: Self-evaluation and plans for revision
Deadline 14: Peer Response Workshop1 classUnit 3: Why do differences in disciplinary writing matter?

Due: Peer Response on 2+ Drafts
Deadline 15: Editing Workshop1 classUnit 3: Why do differences in disciplinary writing matter?

Due: Revised draft of the Comparative Rhetorical Analysis in peer response folder

Due: Self-assessment using 1+ editing techniques (list and description provided)
Deadline 16: Reflections on the Course1 classUnit 3: Why do differences in disciplinary writing matter?

Due: Final draft of your Comparative Rhetorical Analysis

Due: Learning Log #1 0: Reflection on the Course-What I'm Packing for Continued Journeys in Strange (Academic) Lands
This course was approved by UCCC 11.19.2014 and approved by CUE 12.5.2014. Because portions were approved as the old CAF, this form was filled out by OUCC, with syllabus, CAF, and consults attached. Approval memos sent via email to Registration & Records and college liaisons.

GMN 3.13.2015
cmfreem2 (Fri, 27 Mar 2015 14:05:42 GMT): Minor adjustment after approval to remove 'program approval' from requisite/catalog description - CMF
Key: 6829