Viewing: HI 307 : Jewish History

Last approved: Mon, 27 Nov 2017 12:59:59 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 27 Nov 2017 12:59:59 GMT

Changes proposed by: kimler
Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Minor
HI (History)
307
031952
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Jewish History
Jewish History
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
History (16HI)
54.0101
History, General.
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Julie Mell
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture7035Yes
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16HISTBAHistory BAElective
16HISTBSHistory BSElective
16HIMHistory MinorElective
Survey of major topics in the history of the Jews, focusing on the development of Jewish life on the European continent but also covering the patterns of migration that created a global diaspora as well as the forces that formed modern Israel.

The department faculty on our Curriculum Committee reviewed our 300-level offerings and student outcomes, and surveyed the faculty teaching the courses. We have determined that for this course, students are able to successfully engage the material and achieve the learning outcomes without having had a previous course in history. Removing the prerequisite makes the course more available and potentially aids timely progress toward graduation.


Other editorial revisions align the CIM record to the documentation from the course approval, 9/6/13


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will identify the important cultural characteristics of the Jewish religious minority in European, Middle Eastern and American culture, interpreting major events through cultural artifacts/texts of the Jewish experience.
 
 
Students will analyze key texts and documents in Jewish history, culture, and religion. For instance, in the early modern unit, students will be asked to discuss and write papers on Glickl of Hameln's memoirs in relation to the history and position of women, of a minority, and the cultural experience of ever-present death in her early modern world.
 
 
Students will demonstrate an awareness of the act of interpretation itself as a critical form of knowing in the humanities through the reading of primary texts and documents each week during the semester. The course will expose them to differing interpretations.
 
 
In the unit on ancient world, for instance, students will encounter varying interpretations of the Hebrew Bible. In class discussions and written assignments or exam essays, students will describe the issues that motivate differing forms of interpretation of the texts.
 
 
Students will make academic arguments about the Jewish experience using reasons and evidence for supporting those reasons derived from texts, documents, images, films, and material artifacts.
 
 
Students will construct a thesis statement and argue it in a 5-page paper on the basis of historical evidence that answers a question, for example, why the conditions of modern life (political, cultural, religious, etc.) provoked a range of responses to Jewish identity stretching from assimilation, to acculturation, to Zionism and cosmopolitanism.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Students identify the distinguishing characteristics of Jewish individuals in societies and cultures (outside the United States) including widely varying cultures across premodern and modern Europe and the Middle East.
 
 
Students will be asked to reflect on questions in class discussion, course blogs, and exams that cross varying cultures. For the unit on the early 20c, for instance, students would be asked:
-What accounts for what has been called a 'renaissance of Jewish culture in the Weimar Republic'?
-What are the various factors that contributed to a deterioration of Jewish-Arab relations in the Yishuv?
-How did the encounter with modernity change the character of Sephardi and Middle Eastern Jews by the 1930s
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Students will compare the distinguishing characteristics (institutions, economics, culture, religion, or education) of Jews in different non-US societies.
 
 
Students will write a paper exploring the different cultural and institutional experiences of Jews, such as the question of being a minority in medieval Christian European regions versus their experiences in medieval Islamic regions.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
none
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
none
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 



Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to



  • identify the major historical changes in Jewish history from the ancient to the modern period.

  • distinguish and interpret central historical questions in Jewish history and make historical arguments in response to these questions.

  • apply the intellectual discipline of history as a study of change over time and identify different methods and subfields in the discipline such as political, religious, cultural, institutional, and legal history.

  • refine their critical thinking skills and writing skills.


Reviewed for HUM and GK in 2013
Key: 6948
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