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Viewing: PO 212 : Poultry and People: Why did the chicken cross the world?

Last approved: Thu, 15 Oct 2015 08:41:39 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 15 Oct 2015 08:41:39 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
PO (Poultry Science)
212
032195
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Poultry and People: Why did the chicken cross the world?
Poultry and People
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Poultry Science (11PO)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
1
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
HON 297Spring 201520
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)
QEP (TH!NK)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Chris M. Ashwell
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture2020NoThis course will be delivered under the First Year Inquiry (FYI) program.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Poultry species play a vital role in modern society. This course engages students to develop research skills including information literacy, data collection, and developing arguments based on evidence. Specific course topics are developed by students during each course offering. General course content will include, but is not limited by the following topics: History of Domestication, Religious Symbolism, Social and Culinary Practice, and Modern Poultry Production (post-1950) commercial and hobby. Delivery of this course will be inquiry based and focus on utilizing research techniques to gather information, develop a hypothesis, collect information, interpret the results, and report findings in multiple formats.

This course will satisfy several needs that have been presented to the Prestage Department of Poultry Science by our stakeholders.  Within North Carolina and the U.S. there is limited understanding and awareness of the role of poultry production in modern society.  Stakeholders have also indicated the need for developing student's critical and creative thinking skills, which are vital for the modern workforce.  This course focuses on fulfilling both of these needs as well as interfacing with NCSU's current Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP)- TH!NK.  qep.ncsu.edu


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Outcome 2. Discuss religious, cultural, and social aspects of poultry in a global context
Outcome 3. Distinguish the features of modern poultry production since the 1950s
 
 
Each week the course will focus on a specific topic followed by a related assignment, which may be a presentation, debate, or reflection. These assignments prompt students to approach each topic from multiple perspectives. The Poultry Science perspective requires students to approach the topic through content knowledge of the history of man’s interactions with birds and issues surrounding the birds role in society. The Sociological perspective requires students to approach the topic through: the symbolic interactionist perspective, the functionalist perspective, and the conflict perspective each of which offers paradigms for explaining how society influences people, and vice versa.
For example, one weekly topic and assignment covers the issues surrounding California Proposition 2 (2008) in the form of a case study, which was approved by referendum and limits animal confinement including laying hen cage systems. Students are assembled into 5 groups and assigned to represent specific groups that either support or oppose Prop 2. After researching the representative group’s position on Prop 2 (American Veterinary Medical Association, Humane Society of the US, United Egg Producers, and Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production) the students then engage in a debate over the issue in the role of their group in an attempt to convince another group of students (representing the voters, who also formulate questions for the debating groups) to adopt their views. Students are asked to write briefs and position points representing their respective groups. The debate is conducted in classic Lincoln-Douglas style with opening statements, argument points, rebuttals, and closing arguments. Once the debate (moderated by the instructor) is completed the “voters” cast their ballots and there is a mock Prop 2 outcome. Students are then asked to re-evaluate the activity from sociological perspectives including symbolic interactionist perspective, functionalist perspective, and conflict perspective to identify the how each perspective uniquely conceptualizes society, social forces, and human behavior with regard to the Prop 2 vote as well as the historical outcomes that have resulted since its approval in 2008 and enforcement in 2015. Students are then asked to reflect on the interaction of Poultry Science and Society in a writing assignment. The writing prompt is as follows: Describe how the issues surrounding the campaign for/against, and results of voter approval of CA Prop 2 and the various perspectives of the stakeholders involved are representative of modern society in the United States. Be sure to include how a better understanding of Prop 2 has changed your personal perspective on the issue. Content of the reflection will be evaluated using the Integrated Learning VALUE rubric. (see attached GEP-IP documentation)

 
 
Outcome 2. Discuss religious, cultural, and social aspects of poultry in a global context
Outcome 3. Distinguish the features of modern poultry production since the 1950s
 
 
Each week the course will focus on a specific topic followed by a related assignment, which may be a presentation, debate, or reflection. These assignments prompt students to approach each topic from multiple perspectives. The Poultry Science perspective requires students to approach the topic through content knowledge of poultry production and how food labeling practices influence consumers in modern society. The Sociological perspective requires students to approach the topic through: the symbolic interactionist perspective, the functionalist perspective, and the conflict perspective each of which offers paradigms for explaining how society influences people, and vice versa.
For example, one weekly topic and assignment covers the issues surrounding food (poultry) labeling practices, USDA/FDA regulations, public perspective, and social practice. Students are asked to define specific food labeling terms including: natural, fresh, free range, organic, no hormones, no antibiotics, ect. Students are then tasked to collect information on the specific requirements or meaning for these labels, which generally are not equivalent to their prior perceptions. Students are assembled into groups and assigned to develop a survey to assess perceptions of food labels among their peers focusing specifically on “organic, free range, no hormones, and no antibiotics”. These surveys must include demographic information including economic and geographic data for the respondents. Each group deploys the survey on campus and collects data from 40 respondents. Groups are then asked to write summaries of the data collected. Students are prompted to evaluate the survey responses in relation to sociological perspectives including symbolic interactionist perspective, functionalist perspective, and conflict perspective to identify the how each perspective uniquely conceptualizes society, social forces, and human behavior with regard to how food labels are interpreted. Students are then asked to reflect on the interaction of Poultry Science and Society in a writing assignment. The writing prompt is as follows: “Describe how the issues surrounding current food labeling practices and the various perspectives of producers and consumers are representative of modern society in the United States. Be sure to include how a better understanding of food labeling practices has changed your personal perspective on the issue. Content of the reflection will be evaluated using the Integrated Learning VALUE rubric. (see attached GEP-IP documentation)
 
 
Outcome 2. Discuss religious, cultural, and social aspects of poultry in a global context
Outcome 3. Distinguish the features of modern poultry production since the 1950s
Outcome 4. Formulate a hypothesis, collect relevant information considering multiple points of view, and construct a research paper describing the students’ conclusions.
Outcome 5. Prepare a professional presentation, deliver it orally, and critique the presentations of others.
 
 
At the completion of the course students will prepare a research paper describing how the public perception of specific aspects of modern poultry production does not accurately portray the poultry industry and how society (various groups) influence this perception. In this paper, presentation, and public service announcement (PSA) students will be prompted to approach the topic from multiple perspectives. The Poultry Science perspective requires students to approach the topic through content knowledge of poultry production. The Sociological perspective requires students to approach the topic through: the symbolic interactionist perspective, the functionalist perspective, and the conflict perspective each of which offers paradigms for explaining how society influences people, and vice versa. Students are prompted to view the issue at hand through the eyes of various social groups (socioeconomic class, education, dietary). Content of the research paper, presentation and PSA will be evaluated using the Integrated Learning VALUE rubric. (see attached GEP-IP documentation)
 
 
This course will connect and consider the following disciplines: Poultry Science and Sociology.
 
 
The GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives outcomes will be met by offering both theoretical and practical/technical approaches to the subject from multiple perspectives. Students will be expected to conduct individual research inquiries to recognize the distinctions in perspective that the two disciplines of Poultry Science and Sociology and how specific human groups relate to the specific course topics. Lectures, in-class discussions, case-study discussion, role-playing, and inquiry driven research will enable students to integrate the multiple points of view into a cohesive understanding. Also, critical thinking skills will be developed based on the framework of Paul and Elder. Course assignments directed at specific course topics will require students to approach each topic from both disciplinary perspectives, a Poultry Science (Biology/Nutrition/Agriculture) perspective and a Sociological (Cultural norms/Class/Status) perspective.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
First year students only - FYI program
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
No, because this initial offering is planned to be delivered under FYI, additional sections may be offered in the future that will not be restricted to first year students.
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
First year students only.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
No additional resources will be required for this course offering.

Student Learning Outcomes

1. Explain the historical aspects of poultry domestication


2. Discuss religious, cultural, and social aspects of poultry in a global context


3. Distinguish the features of modern poultry production since the 1950s


4. Formulate a hypothesis, collect relevant information considering multiple points of view, and construct a research paper describing the students’ conclusions.


5. Prepare a professional presentation, deliver it orally, and critique the presentations of others.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Other25%A reflection assignment will be given every other week covering the prior 2-weeks topics. Prompts will be provided for each reflection that relate the topics to modern society both in the US and other countries.
Participation25Evaluation of participation falls into the following categories:
A-range: (What every student should strive for)
• Regularly makes helpful, relevant contributions to discussion.
• Occasionally offers observations that challenge other participants to think about the material in new ways.
• Actively participates in small-group discussions.
B-range:
• Occasionally makes helpful, relevant contributions to discussion.
• Actively participates in small-group discussions.
C-range:
• Attends regularly and actively pays attention to discussion.
• Occasionally contributes to small-group discussions.
D or F range:
• Does not attend regularly.
• Does not pay attention to discussion.
• Does not contribute to small-group discussions.
Modifiers:
• Missing more than a couple of classes will lower your grade.
• Being totally distracted or inattentive will lower your grade.
Making contributions to discussion means:
• asking questions about things in the text, or things said in class, that are unclear or confusing
• offering answers to questions asked by others in class
• making claims or observations about the issues being discussed
• offering support, criticism, modification, or clarification for claims being discussed
Notice that the sheer number of your contributions does nothing to improve your grade. Contributions should be relevant and helpful. A genuine question always counts as relevant and helpful.
Relevant contributions show you are engaging with the issue being discussed at the time, and that you are well-prepared for class.
Helpful contributions advance or improve the discussion by
• bringing in new ideas
• helping us understand the issues being discussed
• redirecting our attention to the text
• keeping us "on track"
• changing the subject when needed
Midterm25Mid-Term exams will be essay. Each student will be asked to select one of three topics and write a 2 page position paper describing the influence of the topic on modern life. The essay must include supporting factual information and references.
Other25Students will present their work included in their term papers during the last class meeting time and during the exam period, in lieu of a formal final examination. These presentations will consist of a 15 minute talk and a 90 second (Public Service Announcement, PSA-like). An example powerpoint template will be provided near the end of the semester.

See attached documentation for review of course for GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives category.
gmneugeb (Mon, 20 Apr 2015 13:57:52 GMT): Course was approved at CALS CC level, but trouble occurred with approval process. GMN approving for Jim Flowers.
Key: 7117