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Viewing: FW 445 : Human Dimensions of Conservation Biology in The Bahamas

Last approved: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 09:18:30 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 15 Apr 2015 09:18:30 GMT

Change Type
FW (Fisheries & Wildlife Sciences)
445
032166
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Human Dimensions of Conservation Biology in The Bahamas
Bahamian Conservation Biology
College of Natural Resources
Forestry (15FOR)
Term Offering
Summer Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
3
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
FW 495Summer 201115
FW 495Summer 201313
FW 495Summer 201410
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Remote Location/Site Based
Bahamas
Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
3
10
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Research66.0
Lecture22.0
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Brian Langerhans, M. Nils Peterson
Assistant Professor, Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture115Non/a
Research115Non/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC115Non/a
RSC115Non/a
Prerequisite: One 200-level or higher course in BIO, ES, ET, FOR, FW, NR, PB, PRT, or ZO.
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This course examines the fundamental concepts, problems, and methods regarding human dimensions of conservation biology in The Bahamas. Combining lecture, lab, and fieldwork, students directly experience the process of science, with students conducting semester-long, group research projects tackling important unanswered questions involving conservation biology in The Bahamas. Gaining first-hand experience at the interface of basic and applied sciences, students will spend eight weeks on campus and two weeks in the largely undeveloped Andros Island in The Bahamas, home to the third largest coral reef in the world and over 1.5 million acres of national parks.

The FWCB program at NCSU is the only one of its kind in North Carolina, and the Conservation 

Biology concentration was added in 2012.  This concentration has one required conservation biology 

course (FW 333), and addresses otber conservation biology needs through electives.  BIO/FW 445 will 

obviously provide students novel experiences associated with time spent on Andros.  In addition to 

providing students access to a unique socio-ecological context for coursework, the proposed course 

will fill two important voids in the conservation biology offerings at NCSU: (1) a course with content addressing the relationships between evolution and conservation, and (2) a research based course that leads to conservation biology publications for students. Study abroad courses offered by FWCB faculty (e.g., Namibia [FW 465], Nicaragua [FW 405]) include some overlapping content (e.g., basic principles of conservation biology, natural history [though in different contexts], and immersion in novel socio-cultural contexts) but are not designed with a primary focus on research methods and scientific publications for students.  FW 445 focuses primarily on research, and students from the first two course offerings have already published their results in top tier journals while students from the third course are rapidly preparing two manuscripts for submission.  FW 445 also includes a strong focus on how social and ecological processes interact with evolution (a fundamental principle in conservation biology).  This focal area in not addressed in any course in the UNC system.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

The course is not expected to require additional resources. It will be taught by Nils Peterson who have been teaching it as a 495 course for the last three years. It will not interfere with scheduling for any other courses in the FWCB or BIO majors. Rather it will be an essential co-requisite with Bio 445.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate and apply core concepts regarding human dimensions of conservation and management within the three primary aquatic ecosystems in The Bahamas.

  • Evaluate the importance, procedures, and scientific foundations for conservation and management initiatives in The Bahamas.

  • Evaluate the major threats-and possible methods for solutions-facing the future of biodiversity and sustainable management of natural resources in The Bahamas.

  • Demonstrate and apply a range of field-based research methods and techniques.

  • Effectively conduct primary literature searches to identify relevant scientific articles for particular topics.

  • Work independently and as a team toward a difficult research goal, overcoming inevitable challenges of fieldwork.

  • Develop specific hypotheses, and test them by collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting their own data.

  • Communicate their work in a professional manner with oral presentations and interactive discussions with diverse groups (e.g., classmates, K-12 Bahamian students, professional Bahamian partners).

  • Write a scientific research proposal and research paper, with the goal of publishing their work in a peer-reviewed scientific journal.

  • Gain a broader global knowledge and appreciation of other cultures and the impact of U.S. culture on other parts of the world.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Other20%Research Proposal
Participation20%Participation (based on professor grading field journal)
Other20%Fieldwork and Project Participation, Responsibility, Teamwork (peer evaluation)
Other20%Data Organization and Submission, Research Paper Draft
Major Paper20%Final Research Paper
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Week 11 weekIntroduction to policy and sociology as it relates to conservation biology; 5 assigned readings for each potential research project (3-4 projects)
• Bahamian Conservation Policy Lecture: 1 hour lecture
• Social Impacts on Conservation in the Bahamas Lecture: 1 hour lecture
Week 21 weekDiscussion of first assigned readings
• Facilitated discussions of assigned papers: 2 hours lecture
Week 31 weekSelection of project team members and additional readings discussed
• Facilitated discussions of assigned papers: 1 hour lecture
Week 41 weekGroup proposal preparation and rough draft due
• How to write a research proposal lecture: 1 hour lecture
Week 51 weekOn Andros Island in the Bahamas (group presentations;final proposal due)
• Visit Red Bays Community, introduction to study participants and begin data collection (e.g.,
interviews focus groups): 12 hours research
o Lecture connecting field experience with course content: 1 hour lecture
• Visit Conch Sound Community, introduction to study participants and begin data collection (e.g.,
interviews focus groups): 12 hours research
o Lecture connecting field experience with course content: 1 hour lecture
• Visit Fresh Creek Community, introduction to study participants and begin data collection
(e.g.,interviews focus groups): 12 hours research
o Lecture connecting field experience with course content: 1 hour lecture
Week 61 weekOn Andros Island in the Bahamas; complete fieldwork for research projects
• Visit Red Bays Community, complete data collection (e.g., interviews focus groups): 10 hours
research
o Lecture connecting field experience with your research questions: 2 hours lecture
• Visit Conch Sound Community, complete data collection (e.g., interviews focus
groups):10 hours research
o Lecture connecting field experience with your research questions: 2 hours lecture
• Visit Fresh Creek Community, complete data collection (e.g., interviews focus groups):10 hours
research
o Lecture connecting field experience with your research questions: 2 hours lecture
• Two lectures on social science data analysis (qualitative, quantitative,or mixed methods depending on project): 3 hours lecture
Week 71 weekResearch project data organization and analysis; scientific writing
• Scientific writing lecture: 2 hours lecture
Week 81 weekRough draft due: Methods, tables, figures,and outline of Introduction, Results, and Discussion
• Tables and figures in science lecture: 1 hour lecture
• Peer review in theory lecture: 1 hour lecture
Week 91 weekRough draft of research paper due;practice peer review
Week 101 weekFinal paper due;final presentations
This course was approved by UCCC 3.18.2014. Because portions were approved as the old CAF, this form was filled out by OUCC, with syllabus and CAF attached. Approval memos sent via email to Registration & Records and college liaisons.GMN 3.30.2015. Due to catalog description character issue the last sentence of the description was removed. CMF 4-5-15
Key: 7118