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Viewing: HESM 322 : Dance and Society

Last approved: Thu, 15 Oct 2015 08:41:20 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 15 Oct 2015 08:41:20 GMT

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HESM (Health and Exercise Studies Minor)
322
032245
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Dance and Society
Dance and Society
Division of Academic and Student Affairs
Health and Exercise Studies (24HES)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Even Years
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Beth Wright Fath
Teaching Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3030NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Dance and Society examines dance as an artistic, religious, cultural, and social form, including historic and aesthetic influences, basic dance elements, and relationship to other arts. This course incorporates multiple modalities of dance knowledge - lectures, films, demonstrations, and practical dance experience. A small fee may be required for concert attendance.

This course is an overview of Dance in its many forms and functions within our world. It is more than a review of dance as a Western theatrical form. It contextualizes how dance functions as a religious, cultural, and social form, and how political power influences it. For example, we will discuss how indigenous dances are often banned or changed when the individuals holding political power change.


Students will experience dance physically, intellectually, and culturally. While experiencing this art in a larger viewpoint, the student will construct her/his own definition of dance. This allows the student to focus on his/her interest while still gaining a broader theoretical context for Dance.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Visual & Performing Arts
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Outcome: Discuss the historical and cultural origins of Western Theatrical and American social dance forms.
 
 
1. Written evaluation will include specific exam questions testing the student’s understanding of the historical and cultural origins of specific Western Theatrical dance forms. Example: List and explain the two reasons that turn out is important in ballet.
 
 
Outcome:
1. Evaluate a Western Theatrical dance performance
2. Create and explain a personal definition of dance
 
 
1. Students will attend a dance performance and will submit a written evaluation of the concert applying knowledge specific to the form. Example: Applying knowledge of ballet history, form, and style, if it is a ballet performance.
2. Written evaluation will include specific exam questions to guide the student towards an all-encompassing, non-contradictory definition of dance. Examples: If dance is movement in time and space, is basketball dance? Does dance have to be on a stage?
 
 
Outcome: Create and perform a group movement project.
 
 
1. Students will create and perform a short group movement project based on the values of a particular culture and dance genre.
Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Outcome: Identify characteristics of Western and non-Western dances from cultures covered in class.
 
 
1.Written evaluation will include specific exam questions testing the student’s understanding of the characteristics of dances covered in class. Example: List and describe some of the characteristics of the snake dance ritual performed by the Pullavas in India.
2. Written evaluation will include specific exam questions testing the student's understanding of how shifts on political power can influence specific dances or genres covered in class. Example: Explain how, why, and when the hula was banned. Discuss its survival and if any changes that occurred.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Outcome: Compare similarities and differences in characteristics and values of Western and non-Western cultures’ dances covered in class.
 
 
1. Written evaluation will include specific exam questions testing the student’s understanding of similarities and differences in characteristics and values of different cultures’ dances covered in class. Example: Compare and contrast specific aspects, intent, and historical context of the court dances covered in class from Java and Ghana.
 
 

 
 

 
 
Outcome: Discuss the influence of political power on dances.
 
 
Written evaluation will include specific exam questions testing the student’s understanding of the influence of political power on dance. Example 1: What are 2 theories of why/how Folk dance developed? Describe 1 specific example. Example 2: Describe how the dances of African peoples changed when they were brought to the Americas as slaves, in particular how and why the changes differed in North and South America.
US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
none
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
none
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesDr. Karen YoungDr. Kimler from History was consulted and is in support of this course.
No additional resources will be needed at this time. The reallocation of existing resources, including classroom facilities and instructor assignments, permits the offering of this course.

  1. Deepen their understanding of aesthetic, cultural, and historical dimensions of artistic traditions; and

  2. Strengthen their ability to interpret and make critical judgments about the arts through the analysis of structure, form, and style of specific works; and

  3. Strengthen their ability to create, recreate, or evaluate art based upon techniques and standards appropriate to the genre.

  4. Identify and examine distinguishing characteristics, including ideas, values, images, cultural artifacts, economic structures, technological or scientific developments, and/or attitude of people in a society or culture outside the United States.

  5. Compare distinguishing characteristics between the non-U.S. society and at least one other society.

  6. Explain how these distinguishing characteristics change in response to internal and external pressures on the non-US. Society.


Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify characteristics of Western and non-Western dances from cultures covered in class

  2. Compare similarities and differences in characteristics and values of Western and non-Western cultures’ dances covered in class.

  3. Discuss the influence of political power on dances.

  4. Discuss the historical and cultural origins of Western theatrical and American social dance forms.

  5. Create a group movement project

  6. Evaluate a Western Theatrical dance performance

  7. Create a personal definition of dance


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Multiple exams60 (20 points each)Students will be expected to demonstrate their knowledge of the material covered in class and assigned readings by completing three written exams worth 20% each.
Short Paper10Performance review - 1 performance review is required for this course. Students must attend an instructor-chosen, professionally-choreographed dance performance and write a 5-page paper in response to the concert. This is a personal response to the concert, integrating class content. Guidelines for the paper will be posted on Moodle.
Other5Outside assignment –You will need to complete 1 “outside assignment” for this course chosen from the options below. To receive credit for completing the “outside assignment” you must complete the activity AND turn in your 2-page (minimum) written response to it within 14 calendar days of completing the activity. Failure to do so will result in no credit. Activity choices and guidelines for your written responses to these activities will be posted on Moodle. Activity choices include: 1) observing a dance technique class; 2) participating in a dance class (world, social, or concert form); 3) observing a dance rehearsal; and 4) attending a 2nd dance performance that is NOT a dance studio recital or children’s performance.
Written Assignment10 There will be short writing assignments given as in-class responses to discussions or videos and three (3) short (1-page) homework assignments.
presentation5Movement project – You will work in a small group on a movement project to be presented the last day of class. Student will be graded not on technical difficulty, but rather on success in meeting the parameters of the project. Some work for this project will be completed in class.
Major Paper10Final Paper – This counts as your final exam. You will be required to write 5-7 page paper on a specific topic in dance not covered in this course. The topic is your choice, pending instructor approval. You must use at least 2 non-internet sources, such as a book or journal resource. You may NOT use Wikipedia. All internet sources must be verifiable and accurate in fact, not opinion. If appropriate, you can use an interview with a person as a source. You must get instructor approval prior to interviewing a source. A hard copy of the paper is due to me during the final exam period for this class.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction/syllabus1 classSyllabus review and overview of class
The Power of Dance1 classVideo and written response
The Power of Dance1 classDiscussion of video, reading, and written response
Religious/Ritual Dance1 classLecture and discussion of reading
What is Dance? Who is a Dancer?1 classDiscussion and movement assignment
Religious/Ritual Dance1 classVideo and written response
Religious/Ritual Dance1 classDiscussion of writing assignment and homework
Traditional Dance - folk and cultural traditions1 classMovement experience
Traditional Dance - folk and cultural traditions1 classVideo and written response
Traditional Dance - folk and cultural traditions1 classLecture and discussion
Social Dance1 classVideo and written response
Social Dance1 classLecture and discussion
Social Dance1 classMovement experience
African Diaspora in the Americas1 classVideo and written response
African Diaspora in the Americas1 classLecture and discussion
African Diaspora in the Americas1 classLecture, discussion, and written response
African Diaspora in North American Dance1 classLecture and discussion
Test 11 classWritten test on material covered thus far
What is Dance? Types? Art Theories?1 classLecture and discussion
Looking at Dance1 classLecture, discussion, and written response to videos
Concert Dance1 classConcert discussion
Arts Administration1 classGuest speaker about Arts administration
Elements of Dance1 classDiscussion
Language of Dance - Laban1 classMovement experience
Court Dance1 classVideo and written response
Court Dance1 classLecture and discussion
Court Dance1 classVideo and written response
Court Dance1 classLecture and discussion
Test #21 classTest covering material since Test#1
Movement Project1 classStart group movement project
Ballet1 classVideo and written response
Ballet1 classLecture and discussion
Ballet1 classLecture and discussion
Modern Dance1 classVideo and written response
Modern Dance1 classLecture and discussion
Movement Project1 classWork on group movement project
Modern Dance1 classLecture and discussion
Jazz and Tap1 classVideo and written response
Jazz and Tap1 classLecture and discussion
Dance on Screen1 classLecture, discussion, and written response to videos
Dance on Screen1 classLecture and discussion
Movement Project1 classLast work session for group movement project
Movement Project1 classPresent group movement project
Test#3 Final exam periodWritten test on material covered since Test #2

kkharris (Tue, 14 Apr 2015 19:16:52 GMT): Rollback: Place on agenda for May 4 DASA CCC
kkharris (Fri, 17 Apr 2015 12:45:52 GMT): Rollback: Pulled from DASA CCC agenda on April 13.
kkharris (Tue, 18 Aug 2015 18:33:21 GMT): Approved at DASA CCC on May 4, 2015
kkharris (Tue, 18 Aug 2015 18:42:10 GMT): Approved at DASA CCC on May 4, 2015
gmneugeb (Thu, 20 Aug 2015 14:49:46 GMT): Approved at 5.6.2015 UCCC Meeting GMN 8.20.2015
Key: 7134