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Viewing: HESM 324 : Concert Dance History

Last approved: Tue, 15 Mar 2016 17:53:39 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 15 Mar 2016 17:53:39 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
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HESM (Health and Exercise Studies Minor)
324
032306
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Concert Dance History
Concert Dance History
Division of Academic and Student Affairs
Health and Exercise Studies (24HES)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Odd Years
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Autumn Mist Belk
Teaching Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture2020Nonone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
An overview of the development of Western theatrical dance. This course introduces the major figures and movement theories of the 19th & 20th Centuries with particular emphasis on major stylistic trends and cultural influences. Readings, discussions, lectures, and films/videotapes will introduce selected choreographers and the concerns that inform their work. Additional readings in dance philosophy and aesthetics will address ideas such as form, expression, audience expectations, and performance conventions. A small fee may be required for concert attendance.

This course is an overview of the development of Western theatrical dance. Students will gain perspective and understanding of the important dance movements, teachers, and choreographers throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. This greater understanding of how classical dance forms evolved will produce more authentic performers and choreographers, and it enable students to continue as informed dance audience members throughout their lives beyond college.


Yes
A small fee may be required for concert attendance.
Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
US Diversity
Visual & Performing Arts
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Outcome: Identify and discuss the major choreographers and dance movements of the 19th and 20th Centuries.
 
 
Written evaluation will include specific exam questions testing the student’s understanding of the major choreographers and dance movements. Example: Steve Paxton is known to be one of the originators of what dance movement/style beginning in the 1960s? Explain two concepts of this movement style.
 
 
Outcome 1: Compare the similarities and differences among concurrent U.S. historical dance movements.
Outcome 2: Trace the changing characteristics and values of dance as a performing art form.
 
 
1. Written evaluation will include directed questions for journaling asking students to discuss two concurrent dance movements.
Example: This week in class we watched a modern dance video from the 1940s in the U.S. and one from the 1940s from Germany. How did these works differ and how were they alike?
2. Written evaluation will include specific exam questions to test the student’s understanding of the timeline and scope of dance performance. Example: Has the ideal “dancer body” changed from the earliest forms of concert dance to today? (Support your opinion with examples from various choreographers/companies/styles.)
 
 
Outcome: Evaluate a theatrical dance performance within historical contexts.
 
 
Students will submit a written critique of a dance concert (viewed wither live or on video), applying knowledge specific to the historical context. Example: Applying knowledge of early American modern dance history, form, and style, if it is a video of Isadora Duncan performing.
Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
Describe how the rise of American concert dance both withheld and provided opportunities for employment and leadership among women, minorities, and other marginalized groups.
 
 
Written evaluation will include specific exam questions to test the student’s understanding of the fight of specific minority groups within the dance field to obtain equal opportunities. Example: Compare and contrast the role of African American women dancers in professional ballet and professional modern dance companies. How have these traditional roles shifted over time and what social actions lead to these changes?
 
 
Describe various cultural interactions contributing to the emergence and growth of modern dance, post-modern dance, and improvised performance throughout the United States.
 
 
Written evaluation will include directed questions for journaling, asking students to discuss specific cultural interactions contributing to dance performance in the United States. Example: This week in class we watched a video of an improvised performance by Judson Church Theater. Identify the artists involved in this performance and discuss how their diversity (in relation to class, ethnicity, and/or sexual orientation) contributed to the formation of improvisation and contact improvisation as a performance style.
Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
n/a
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
see syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
see syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
see syllabus
No additional resources will be needed at this time. The reallocation of existing resources permits the offering of this course.

I. Objectives for courses in the category of Visual and Performing Arts


Each course fulfilling the GEP Visual and Performing Arts objectives will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:



  1. Deepen their understanding of aesthetic, cultural, and historical dimensions of artistic traditions; and

  2. Strengthen their ability to interpret and make critical judgments about the arts through the analysis of structure, form, and style of specific works; and

  3. Strengthen their ability to create, recreate, or evaluate art based upon techniques and standards appropriate to the genre.


II. Objectives for courses in the category of U.S. Diversity


Each course in U.S. Diversity will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least two of the following:



  1. Analyze how religious, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability, and/or age identities are shaped by cultural and societal influences;

  2. Categorize and compare historical, social, political, and/or economic processes producing diversity, equality, and structured inequalities in the U.S.;

  3. Interpret and evaluate social actions by religious, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability, and/or age groups affecting equality and social justice in the U.S.;

  4. Examine interactions between people from different religious, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability, and/or age groups in the U.S.


Student Learning Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes: 


By the end of this course, students will be able to…



  1. Identify and discuss the major choreographers and dance movements of the 19th and 20th Centuries.

  2. Trace the changing characteristics and values of dance as a performing art form.

  3. Compare the similarities and differences among concurrent U.S. historical dance movements.

  4. Describe how the rise of American concert dance both withheld and provided opportunities for employment and leadership among women, minorities, and other marginalized groups.

  5. Describe various cultural interactions contributing to the emergence and growth of modern dance, post-modern dance, and improvised performance throughout the United States.

  6. Evaluate a theatrical dance performance within historical contexts.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Exam20Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the material covered in class and assigned readings by completing one midterm written exam.
Final Exam20Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the material covered in class and assigned readings by completing one final written exam.
Major Paper20Students will write one 8-10 page research paper based on a choreographer and the analysis of his/her work.
Short Paper10Students will critique and evaluate a dance performance (live or from video) in relation to the historical concepts discussed in class. Critiques should be 3-5 pages in length.
Written Assignment30Students are expected to actively participate in all in-class discussions and should record additional thoughts based on readings or class lectures in a weekly journal entry (minimum one-page written per week).

kkharris (Tue, 14 Apr 2015 19:17:15 GMT): Rollback: Place on agenda for May 4 DASA CCC
kkharris (Fri, 17 Apr 2015 12:47:02 GMT): Rollback: Pulled from DASA CCC agenda on April 13.
kkharris (Tue, 18 Aug 2015 17:07:48 GMT): Approved at DASA CCC on May 4, 2015
kkharris (Tue, 18 Aug 2015 17:10:25 GMT): Approved at DASA CCC on May 4, 2015
gmneugeb (Thu, 20 Aug 2015 14:50:12 GMT): Approved at 5.6.2015 UCCC Meeting. GMN 8.20.2015
gmneugeb (Thu, 10 Sep 2015 11:55:45 GMT): The VPA category for this course was APPROVED without discussion on 9.4.2015. The USD category for this course was APPROVED PENDING consultation and working with the Office of Assessment on the USD category objectives and outcomes on 9.4.2015.
gmneugeb (Thu, 24 Sep 2015 18:19:08 GMT): Rollback: .
gmneugeb (Thu, 24 Sep 2015 18:21:56 GMT): Rollback: .
Key: 7150