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Viewing: HI 254 : Modern American History

Last approved: Tue, 12 May 2015 15:21:03 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 12 May 2015 15:21:03 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
HI (History)
254
032178
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Modern American History
Modern American History
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
History (16HI)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Every Year
Fall 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Katherine Mellen Charron
Associate Professor of History

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture160+35-160+YesThe department offers its U.S. survey courses in various formats. These include a large lecture (120-160 students) with 6-8 discussion sections; a double section (70 students); and a regular section (35 students.) HI 254 will be offered in all of these formats.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
X: Credit not allowed for both HI 254 and HI 252.
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16HISTBA-16HISTTEDHistory BA - Teacher Education ConcentrationElective
Major themes in modern American history with an emphasis on diversity in the United States; focuses on aspects of race/ethnicity, gender, class, sexual orientation, disability, religious and/or age identities as it considers the impacts of industrialization and economic modernization; impact of war on American domestic and foreign policy; continuity and change in American institutions and values; problem solving in a pluralistic society. Credit is not allowed for both HI 254 and HI 252.

The History Department seeks to add HI 254 to fulfill the university's GEP Diversity requirement, and thereby make more seats available to all undergraduates who need a GEP Diversity credit. This course will provide an introduction to modern U.S. history (post-Civil War) with particular attention to aspects of race/ethnicity, gender, class, sexual orientation, disability, religious, and/or age identities in shaping the American experience. It will be taught by multiple instructors in any given semester.


Please note: Details and examples below are drawn from my class. However, different instructors will use different materials to achieve the same ends.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will interpret the American experience since the end of the Civil War by examining similarities and differences within its population based on geographical region, migration, immigration, industrialization, urbanization, suburbanization, and de-industrialization.
 
 
Exam short essay question: Scott Reynolds Nelson's article "Who Was John Henry?: Railroad Construction, Southern Folklore, and the Birth of Rock and Roll" uses the historical figure of John Henry to explore several developments in the post-Reconstruction era. Identify the developments illustrated by how the iconic song "John Henry" has functioned in American culture across time.

[Answer expected to include: laws that discriminated against African Americans and led to higher rates of incarceration for black men; state leasing of prisoners to private corporations to build railroads; the exploitation of workers due to the lack of any protective labor legislation as large-scale industrialization began; cultural exchanges among immigrants and prisoners laboring together in railroad construction.]
 
 
Students will read and interpret primary (documents) and secondary (books/articles) sources that reflect a variety of perspectives, and move from learning facts to making critically reasoned judgments grounded in course content.
 
 
Paper assignment.
A paper assignment asks students to locate a current event article published by a major news source since the class began. Drawing from course lectures and readings, they write a five-page paper that analyzes the connection between the current event and one aspect of American political, social, economic, and/or cultural history that we have studied in class.

[Assessment of their work is based on students' ability to identify and analyze a major event that influenced American history; construct an argument that addresses major themes and questions of the relevant historical period; and demonstrate their understanding of both the continuity and change represented in the current event and the historical event they choose discuss.]
 
 
Students will identify and analyze major events that influenced modern American society, and explain how individuals and groups interact with institutional structures to yield historical change.
 
 
Final Exam essay question

Example: Freedom has been a defining feature of our identity in the United States. Yet freedom itself is not a static concept; it has evolved and changed over time. More often than not, different groups of people with different proximity to power have contested exactly what freedom means. How have these battles been fought in terms of both grassroots action and in the realm of high politics? In what ways have they taken shape in relation to international politics? Finally, how have they helped both to expand and to limit the definition of freedom across the twentieth century?

[For full credit, students are instructed to answer this question with at least one example from the 19th century (1865-1899), at least two examples from the pre-World War II era (1900-1940), and at least two examples from 1941 to the present.]
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
See Objective 2 and Objective 3
 
 

 
 
Students will be able to identify and analyze how race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, regional, religious, disability and/or age identities are shaped in historical context, to evaluate the reasoning and deeds of our predecessors.
 
 
Paper Assignment

Example: Across the semester, students read and discuss primary documents written by a variety of Americans. In the course of considering the Progressive Era (1890-1920), a typical paper assignment will ask them to interpret and compare a wide range of perspectives that pertain to how social, political, and/or economic processes produced diversity, equality, and/or structured inequalities in the U.S. in the early 20th century.
 
 
Students will describe how identities shaped by race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, region, religion, disability and/or age relate to concepts such as freedom, equality and justice as well as how they change over time.
 
 
Paper Assignment

Example: Select one document on domestic policy authored by an individual or group associated with the New Left and one document authored by an individual or group associated with the New Right. Write a five page paper that analyzes how these two contrasting perspectives have shaped American history since the 1960s, relating social identity to the author’s view.
 
 
See Objective 2 and Objective 3
 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
No seats are restricted.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None. They gain specific skills--like the ability to analyze and compare historical texts and contemporary texts--in the class.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Eric Foner, "Give Me Liberty: An American History," Seagull edition, vol. 2, 4th edition [Textbook]
Eric Foner, "Voice of Freedom: A Documentary History," vol. 2, 4th edition [Primary document reader]
Ernest R. May, ed., "The 9/11 Commission Report with Related Documents" [Primary document reader with introduction]

Additional Articles/Chapters by Scholars: See attached sample syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Major Topics by Historical Period: Reconstruction, Gilded Age, Progressive Era, Interwar Years, New Deal, World War II, Cold War, Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam War, New Left Philosophy and Movements, New Right Philosophy and Movements, Globalization, U.S. and the Middle East, 9/11 Attacks, Hurricane Katrina.

Major Topics by Fields/Sub-fields of History: Race/ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, regional, religious, cultural, domestic and foreign policy, immigration, urban/rural, industrial/agricultural, political, economic, legal, social, history of technology.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
None.
The History department offers multiple sections of 200-level U.S. History. Teachers of HI 254 will have it in their standard load, replacing HI 252. The number of seats of 200-level U. S. history will not be affected. Tenure track faculty and second-year Ph.D. Public History graduate students will teach HI 254 beginning in the fall of 2015.

* Note: During their first year in the program, all Ph.D. graduate students will TA for a large (120-160+) section in both the fall and spring semesters. The tenure-track faculty leading the course will provide intensive mentoring to students serving as their TAs. The History Department also requires all future HI 254 graduate student instructors to complete a 1.0 credit hour course on teaching and pedagogy. Moreover, the History Department strongly encourages all graduate students to complete some teacher training programs available elsewhere on campus, such as the COAT program.

During the semester, students will:


1. Interpret the American experience since the end of the Civil War by exploring similarities and differences within its population based on geographical region, migration, immigration, industrialization, urbanization, suburbanization, and de-industrialization as well as major political, economic, legal, technological, and social changes.


2. Examine individual and collective actions that have influenced the formation of modern American society.


3. Consider questions of race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, regional, religious, disability, and/or age identities to evaluate the reasoning and deeds of our predecessors and where we stand, both at home and abroad, in the twenty-first century.


4. Gain a familiarity with the practice of history; or the means that historians use to offer informed perspectives on the past as well as relevant debates about that past among historians.


5. Learn to move from learning facts to making critically reasoned judgments grounded in course content.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students should be able to:


1. Identify and analyze major events that influenced modern American history AND how concepts of democracy, freedom, equality, and justice have evolved and changed over time.


2. Critically evaluate and interpret primary (documents) and secondary (books/articles) sources as well as historical and contemporary cultural texts.


3. Construct arguments that answer major historical questions that pertain to the U.S. across the 20th century.


4. Explain how race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, regional, religious, disability and/or age identities are shaped by cultural and social influences.


5. Articulate how historical, political, economic, legal, and social processes have produced diversity and equality as well as how they have functioned to reinforce structural inequalities in the U.S.


6. Describe how individuals, groups, and institutions interact to yield historical change and how these affect equality and social justice in the U.S.


7. Recognize how the act of interpretation itself is a critical form of knowing in the Humanities as well as the variety of factors that shape how you, as an individual, view and interpret the past.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes5%Discussion section quizzes; see attached sample syllabus
Participation15%Discussion section participation; see attached sample syllabus
Short Paper2 @ 15% eachSee attached sample syllabus
Midterm20%See attached sample syllabus
Final Exam30% See attached sample syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached sample syllabus

Key: 7172