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Viewing: HI 354 : The Rise of the American Empire

Last approved: Tue, 23 Feb 2016 09:08:51 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 23 Feb 2016 09:08:51 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
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HI (History)
354
032203
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
The Rise of the American Empire
Rise of American Empire
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
History (16HI)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Alternate Even Years
Fall 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Nancy Mitchell
Professor, History

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC3535NoN/A

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16HISTBAHistory-BAElective
16HISTBSHistory-BSElective
16HIMHistory MinorElective
This course investigates the rise of the American Empire from the Spanish American War of 1898 through the 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center. The purpose of the course is not only to acquaint you with the crises and triumphs of US foreign policy from 1898 to 2001, but also to help you develop your own analysis of whether the acquisition of empire was accidental or deliberate, or a combination of both.

This new class will expose NC State students to the dramatic rise of the US empire from 1898 to the present.  It will be particularly relevant to students majoring or minoring in History, International Studies, and Political Science, but it will also be of interest to a wide variety of students, including those intending to join the US military as well as foreign students.  It fills a gap between the survey of modern US history (HI 252) and the intensive seminar on the US foreign policy (HI 454/554). HI 252 is not a pre-requisite, because the course is designed to be open to non-majors, not requiring entry with skills specific to the major. It will teach students the skill of archival research, taking advantage of the exceptionally rich databases the are available at D.H.Hill Library.  This course is an important avenue to encourage NC State students to be more knowledgeable and sensitive to the US role in the world. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
1. describe and analyze the complicated stages of the rise of the United States to global superpower – focusing not just on wars and military interventions but also on the roles played by technology, "soft power," and covert operations.
 
 
Weekly historical events blog-post summarized in Interactive Time-line submission. Each week, students will select two historical "events" for the period being studies, and submit an analytical reflection with their historical judgment of whether or not the events were deliberate or accidental (or a combination of both) steps in the creation of the American empire. Students will summarize their blog posts by entering these two "events" with analyses on their timeline.
 
 
2. analyze historians’ arguments and the use of primary documents to place current perceptions in historical context.
 
 
Weekly Primary Source Analysis of historical documents. For example, students will read the Espionage and Sedition Acts (1917-1918) to analyze views on the need to redefine national loyalty and speech rights as part of the war effort.
 
 
3. identify and use historical evidence to construct and support analytical arguments assessing the costs and benefits – for Americans and others – of the growth of US power.
 
 
Collaborative WebQuest research project with individual research paper analyzing Carter's response to the Iranian Revolution.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
see attached Syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
see attached Syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
N/A
Shifting of departmental resources allows this offering. The History Department has started a PhD program in Public History this academic year. Next year, advanced PhD students who have been through our pedagogical training will begin teaching sections of HI 252, which has been a staple of Prof. Mitchell’s teaching rotation. The new course will partly replace it in her standard load.

Students will:


1.    strengthen their scholarly, critical perspective on the complicated stages of the rise of the United States to global superpower – focusing not just on wars and military interventions but also on the roles played by technology, "soft power," and covert operations;

2.    strengthen their ability to apply sound historical reasoning to analysis of how – and why – the United States is perceived as it is by other nations;

3.    strengthen their ability to apply sound historical reasoning to assess the costs and benefits – for Americans and others – of the growth of US power;

4.    strengthen their ability with historical research skills to confront the complexity of history by doing research with primary documents;

5.    strengthen their critical thinking skill and sharpen the ability to judge which sources (including websites) are most reliable, and why.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the semester, students will  be able to:  


1.    describe and analyze the complicated stages of the rise of the United States to global superpower – focusing not just on wars and military interventions but also on the roles played by technology, "soft power," and covert operations;

2.    critically examine the underlying historical reasons for how – and why – the United States is perceived as it is by other nations;

3.    integrate course information to assess the costs and benefits – for Americans and others – of the growth of US power;

4.    use standards of historical evidence and reasoning to evaluate the reliability of sources (including websites), and why.  


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Multiple exams20%Three hourly tests
Other5%Voicethread
Project25%WebQuest
Other20%Blog and Timeline
Project30%Primary source activity (including debates)
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
see attached Syllabussee attached Syllabussee attached Syllabus

cmfreem2 (Thu, 30 Apr 2015 15:24:39 GMT): UCCC tabled 4.29.15 meeting re: Cat Title/Description_use of term Empire.
Key: 7179