Preview Workflow

Viewing: SW 524 : Portrayals of Social Welfare in Urban Life

Last approved: Thu, 02 Jun 2016 17:36:38 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 02 Jun 2016 17:36:34 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
SW (Social Work)
524
032337
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Portrayals of Social Welfare in Urban Life
Portrayals of Social Welfare
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Social Work (16SW)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Upon Demand
Summer 1 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
4
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
SW 595Summer 20114
SW 595Spring 201314
SW 595Spring 20143
SW 595Spring 20156
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Seminar3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jocelyn DeVance Taliaferro
Associate Professor
Full

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Seminar1212NoNo scheduled lecturer/seminars; materials are available through flexible access.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
SEM1212Non/a
None
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This course provides an in-depth analysis of social policy development in the urban context and the multi-dimensional nature of environments, communities, and individuals. Popular media (newspaper and journal articles, film, television, and textbooks) will proxy as a microcosm of contemporary social welfare problems and purported solutions. Following an ethical and social justice paradigm, this course will examine the portrayals of the urban experience and the attendant social problems of life (crime, drugs, economic bifurcation, educational system, and the media) in an economically depressed or struggling major metropolitan area.

The course is tailored to students interested in exploring issues of diversity, social justice, and contemporary social welfare issues. Social welfare portrayals in the media have largely been negative and demoralizing.  All too often social work and social welfare are seen as part of society’s problems rather than solutions. In an economic and social environment of intolerance, economic bifurcation, and redacting of the social safety net, it is imperative that citizens have an awareness of the complexity of social problems and therefore the need for nuanced social welfare policy responses. While many citizens are seeking a silver bullet solution to problems of central cities, they simply do not exist. Because most citizens are not and cannot be exposed to the complexity of social problems in an intimate way, television series and other popular media can be used as the “fishbowl” in which students can get this exposure. Because citizens must have an awareness of problems to find reasonable solutions, this course is designed to provide a space for reasoned discussion and debate regarding social policy problems, policies, and programs. Issues of power, cultural competency, diversity, ethical practice, social justice, and critical thinking are considered within the context of popular culture.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesVariousPolitical Science, Sociology, and Communications DGPs approved the teaching of the course in April, 2015.
When the course is offered via Distance Education, resources will be provided through the Distance Education budget. There are no lectures when the course is offered to on campus students; materials are available through flexible access; the instructor will teach the course as part of regular instructional duties.

Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able to:


1. Identify the major themes of the television program. (Measure:  Exam I, Exam II);

2. Critique their own sources of privilege and personal assumptions regarding disadvantaged populations. (Measure:  Autobiography);

3. Recognize how social policies differently affect diverse populations in American society (Measure: Exam II);

4. Define the processes by which policy is made in the public arena (Measure:  Exam I, Character & Power Analysis);

5. Interpret the complex impact that urbanization has had on institutions and individuals (Measure:  Exam I, Character & Power Analysis)

6. Discuss the economic and political theories, constraints, and opportunities in the development of social welfare problems and policies; (Exam I, Exam II)

7. Apply their understanding of urban issues to the development and critical analysis of programs and policies appropriate to addressing contemporary social and economic problems. (Character & Power Analysis)


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Written Assignment10%Character and Power Analysis
Written Assignment10%Autobiography Assignment
Exam15%Exam one
Written Assignment25%Policy Solution Assignment
Exam20%Exam Two
Participation20%Class participation
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Crime, gangs, drug culture, urban areas and neighborhoods.weeks 1 to 4 The Wire: Season 1
Urban economies, unions, economic bifurcation, gentrification, employment and jobsweeks 5 to 8 The Wire: Season 2
Political & social institutions, policy making, intended and unintended consequences of social policy, elections, Black Mayors.Weeks 9 to 12 The Wire: Season 3
Education policy, teaching and learning, impacts of family and community on student success, policy making.Weeks 13 to 15 The Wire: Season 4
Final examExam WeekFinal exam
ghodge 08/27/2015- Comments from ABGS reviewers need to be addressed:
FIXED-syllabus- max points is 1000 not 100
ADDRESSED-consultation- consider political science, sociology, and communications
FIXED-enrollment component- indicate that there are no scheduled lecturer/seminars
FIXED-instructional resource statement- there are no lectures when the course is offered to on campus students; materials are available through flexible access

ABGS reviewer comment: "While material such as 'The Wire' can serve as excellent supplemental sources, I wonder if the time devoted to it, contrasted to an examination of the discipline's published scholarly literature is the appropriate ratio?"

FROM THE INSTRUCTOR: I am writing an entire book on how to teach using The Wire -- that is the actual title of the book that is being published by McFarland books. The content of The Wire illuminates the very issues that scholarly literature seeks to explain. The Wire as a text, provides examples that cannot be provided otherwise. Just as service learning takes up significant time in a course, viewing The Wire takes time. The series is not a sitcom or episodic television program. It is a sequence of stories that are intertwined and taken discretely would diminish the effectiveness of the example. It is a substantial amount of television watching but it is relevant and elucidates issues that cannot be otherwise (ethically) demonstrated.
ghodge (Fri, 24 Apr 2015 20:46:27 GMT): points for policy solution assignment in syllabus do not match course action form make course length 15 weeks
ghodge (Wed, 06 May 2015 18:05:54 GMT): Syllabus does not match course action form for points for each assignment. Syllabus grading scale should go to 1000 not 100.
mlnosbis (Tue, 12 May 2015 18:07:30 GMT): Suggested revisions made by department.
wemory (Fri, 28 Aug 2015 14:18:59 GMT): Rollback: Rollback - revisions suggested by ABGS. MSW DGP is new - rolling back to CHASS CC chair to help Dept DGP -- ae
Key: 7183