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Viewing: PRT 730 : Tourism, community health and sustainability  

Last approved: Sat, 23 May 2015 08:46:58 GMT

Last edit: Sat, 23 May 2015 08:46:58 GMT

Change Type
PRT (Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management)
730
032200
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Tourism, community health and sustainability  
Tourism, Health, and Sustainab
College of Natural Resources
Parks, Recr & Tourism Mgmt (15PRT)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
4
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
PRT 795Sp 201212
PRT 795Sp 201311
PRT 795Sp 20144
PRT 795Sp 201510
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
15
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Duarte B. Morais
Associate professor
Full

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture1518NoAnticipate 15.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
In this course students will examine the potential role of tourism in mitigating or exacerbating health disparities and environmental degradation in rural poor areas. The course endorses an academic ethic of engaged scholarship. Students will be asked to make original contributions to participatory development scholarship, and they will be asked to collaborate with community partners on an applied project addressing tourism, health disparities and environmental degradation in an economically depressed rural community. Consistent with the engaged nature of this course, we will travel to rural communities to meet stakeholders, collect data, and provide coaching/training to tourism micro-entrepreneurs.

This course integrates insight from disciplines such as critical social science, health, agriculture, development and environmental science to engage students in discussions about social innovation through tourism.  The course will provide PRTM graduate students with a focus on Equitable and Sustainable Tourism a deep understanding of critical tourism theory and it’s grounding on literature from other disciplines.  The course will also appeal to graduate students in other PRTM foci (i.e, health and wellbeing and human dimensions of natural resources) and to graduate students in other programs across campus, because those students 

will learn how their specific disciplinary expertise intersects with other bodies of knowledge in the rich context of tourism studies.


The course also blurs the boundary between on­campus learning and community engagement, involving students in the practice of participatory action research through their involvement in a longitudinal project fostering equitable and sustainable rural community development through tourism in North Carolina.  Students conduct group fieldwork in an economically depressed rural community in North Carolina.  They work with community partners to write a community development proposal, and they accompany a rural tourism micro­entrepreneur throughout the semester.  Each year the students “inherit” the community impact and longitudinal data generated by their predecessors and redirect their own contributions with the involvement of long­term community partners.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesTIm WallaceThis course is very appropriate for ANTH students.
College of Natural ResourcesErin SillsThis course is a valuable addition
College of Humanities and Social SciencesHeidi HobbsI support this course and have endorsed it to MIS students.
The course relies on existing classroom technology.  Biltmore 2006 was used in Spring 2014 with
 success. Due to the communityengaged format of the course, the instructor will develop a course 
budget each year, solicit funds from the College, Department and host community as appropriate.  In
 the last three years, funds for the fieldwork were obtained from the host community, the College, and the PRTM Department.  The instructor will request to use College vehicles and fuel for the 5day 
fieldwork trip.  The instructor will raise community support for lodging (lodging has been provided by 
the host community in the previous three years).  Outstanding funds for selfcatered food supplies will 
be sought from the Department of PRTM and other sources as appropriate.  

During fieldwork, the students will be trained to use mobile digital equipment (e.g., GigaPan 360 photography; handheld GPS) as appropriate.  This equipment is already available for instructional and 
research use in the Visualization Lab and from the NC Tourism Extension.

In this course students will…

    gain an understanding of different tourism, community health and sustainable development paradigms;

    acquire hands-on experience in working along with individuals with vulnerable livelihoods to understand challenges to their well-being and to the sustainability of natural environments;

    delineate ways to leverage opportunities afforded by tourism to enable sustainable and dignifying livelihoods;


Student Learning Outcomes

  By the end of the course, the students will be able to:


 Identify and critique understandings of different tourism, community health and sustainability paradigms;


Articulate challenges to well‐being and to the sustainability of natural environments as a result of hands‐on experience and of working along with individuals with vulnerable livelihoods;


Delineate ways to leverage opportunities afforded by tourism to enable sustainable and dignifying livelihoods.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Other30%Participatory community dev. Proposal(Past RFP from NC Rural Center’s Economic Innovation Grants)
Other30%Case study of tourism micro-entrepreneur(Assignment description providedin syllabus)
Other30%Research proposal(Each year’s RFP from Tourism Cares for Tomorrow Graduate Scholarship)
Other5%Discussions briefs
Participation5%A course with such a significant engagement component must require students to participate in activities outside the classroom. We will meet with partners two or three times in the Research Triangle and Chapel Hill, we will have overnight trips to rural NC communities, and we will meet face-to-face several times with key informants. Students are expected to make themselves available to these activities, but make-up activities can be arranged in the event of unavoidable schedule conflicts. Students who are frequently unable to participate in scheduled off-campus activities and do not arrange make-up activities will be penalized in this attendance grade.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introductions + Intro to class + Tourism, prosperity & conservationWeek 1Lecture
Community-Based Tourism ManagementWeek 2Lecture
People-First Development and Participatory ResearchWeek 3Lecture
Hedonism, gender, oppression and powerWeek 4Lecture
The whole community – kinship ties, social capital, traditional leadersweek 5Lecture
Vulnerable livelihoods, well-being and self-determinationWeek 6Documentary-To Catch a Dollar
Micro-entrepreneurship and micro-financeWeek 7Case presentation
Poverty and health Week 8Letter of Inquiry
Global health and One healthWeek 9Lecture
Eco-dependent livelihoods and self-determined conservationWeek 10Milking the Rhino
Social entrepreneurship, social business, bottom-up developmentWeek 11Research Proposal
Hardin to Ostrom: Sustainable use of common pool resourcesWeek 12Lecture
Measuring and understanding endemic poverty and servitudeWeek 13Lecture
Politics of representation – tourism and social controlWeek 14Case Proposal
Public presentations of project proposalsWeek 15Case Study

ghodge (Thu, 02 Apr 2015 14:55:51 GMT): Add student learning outcomes to syllabus after the course goals section. Under evaluation methods "other" is indicated. Should these be listed as "written assignments" or "projects" or "major tern paper"
ghodge (Mon, 13 Apr 2015 20:43:31 GMT): department want to keep the evaluation methods as "other"
Key: 7186