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Viewing: ENG 339 : Literature and Technology

Last approved: Fri, 16 Dec 2016 09:01:48 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 16 Dec 2016 09:01:48 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ENG (English)
339
032404
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Literature and Technology
Literature and Technology
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Every Year
Spring 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jennifer Nolan-Stinson/Paul Fyfe
Assistant Professor of English/Assistant Professor of English

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLLTEnglish LiteratureElective
16ENGLBA English BA Elective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRW English BA- Creative Writing Elective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA- Film Elective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA - Language, Writing , and Rhetoric Elective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTED English BA-Teacher Education Elective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLM English BA- MinorElective
Introduction to how the interactions among technologies, media, and literature shape the cultural past. The course pursues studies of fictional and non-fictional texts through several disciplinary perspectives including literary criticism, communications, media theory, and history. Technologies and literary and historical eras considered will vary.

Recent changes to both the University’s Strategic Plan, which calls for “enhanced interdisciplinary scholarship to address the grand challenges of society,” and the General Education Program (GEP) demonstrate NC State’s commitment to fostering interdisciplinary research and teaching. As was noted in the 2014 Report of the MLA Task Force on Doctoral Study in Modern Language and Literature, concurrently interdisciplinary approaches have enriched literary study as well, and “innovative understandings of human experience, past and present, and of the challenges we face are emerging in the work of our scholars,” (9) including faculty in NCSU’s English Department. By tapping into underutilized strengths within our faculty and providing a formalized offering incorporating the interdisciplinary approaches to literature many English professors already bring into the classroom, ENG 339 is one of a series of courses being proposed by the English Department to make our contributions to interdisciplinary inquiry more visible, while also meeting the needs of students seeking courses that fulfill the Interdisciplinary Perspectives GEP requirement. Given NC State’s historic strengths in STEM, the topic of this course seems especially appropriate for our student body and we imagine that its technological focus might be of particular interest to engineering and computer science majors. Further, in addition to meeting the needs of the general undergraduate population, increasing our interdisciplinary offerings will provide English majors with a better sense of contemporary literary scholarship.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Identify and distinguish between approaches to literature and cultural history from disciplines
including English, Communications, History, and Media Studies.
 
 
Critical Essay:
Considerations of newspaper serialization often serve as traditional ways of understanding the literature of this period. Beyond such insight, how does the historical development of the railroad, telephone, telegraph, and developing modes of surveillance inform our understanding of Victorian literature? Among others, consider the influence of the railroad on works by Dickens, Rossetti, and Wordsworth as well as Twain’s depiction of speaking on the telephone. To what degree are Henry James’s insights on surveillance still relevant today? Use insights from the historians and communication scholars we’ve read such as Stanley, Kate, Punch, and Keep.
 
 
Identify, analyze, and apply applications of and cross-connections between disciplines producing scholarship on literature and the historical past, such as English, Communications, History, and Media Studies
 
 
Critical Essay:
Delineate multiple disciplinary approaches to a single course text and discuss their relative interests, strengths, and weaknesses one by one.
 
 
Develop and execute critical and creative syntheses of the methodologies of the two disciplines listed above.
 
 
Critical Essay:
Considerations of newspaper serialization often serve as traditional ways of understanding the literature of this period. Beyond such insight, how does the historical development of the railroad, telephone, telegraph, and developing modes of surveillance inform our understanding of Victorian literature? Among others, consider the influence of the railroad on works by Dickens, Rossetti, and Wordsworth as well as Twain’s depiction of speaking on the telephone. To what degree are Henry James’s insights on surveillance still relevant today? Use insights from the historians and communication scholars we’ve read such as Stanley, Kate, Punch, and Keep.
 
 
English and Communication
 
 
Though interdisciplinary in nature, this course is inherently cohesive through its focus on a common topic. Our readings and discussions of fictional and non-fictional texts will encourage students to consider how the interactions among technologies, media, and literature shape the cultural past from a variety of disciplinary perspectives (listed above), which will be reinforced by in-class exercises and assignments asking them to apply and synthesize these approaches. See the attached syllabus for details.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
N/A
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
see attached syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
see attached syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
see attached syllabus
This course will not require allocation of any additional resources of faculty, facilities, or equipment. Several members of the English department faculty are qualified to teach this course, including Jennifer Nolan-Stinson and Paul Fyfe, and intend to do so as a part of their regular teaching commitments.

Student Learning Outcomes

Having completed this course and its requirements, students will be able to:


1. explain the concerns of the Victorian era and its literature for changing forms of communication;

2. write thoughtful and structured papers using peer-reviewed criticism about these concerns as they manifest in particular texts;

3. analyze how twenty-first century telecommunications mediate and reshape our understanding of the cultural past.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes15%Expect intermittent pop quizzes at the beginning of some class periods. Quizzes, though sometimes annoying, are necessary in a reading course to keep us honest. They shouldn’t be terribly hard, and will serve to evaluate your progress with and comprehension of the reading assignments.
Discussion15%Class discussion, by definition, is a select group of active participants in a course of study. Seminars are not lectures. They thrive on the participation of their members. This means engaging with the reading material and with your peers. Participation includes but is not limited to speaking up in class. While thoughtfully participating in our in-class discussions is strongly encouraged, this course will also seek to provide alternative and creative forms of participation and response. Please do your best to take advantage of them.
Project15%Students will be assigned to one of four groups, and each group will be responsible for our collaborative online timeline, posting discussion questions, or a specified assignment (i.e. homework) before a designated class. Groups will rotate, so that students can expect to contribute every other week. These assignments are meant to call attention to what you think are particularly interesting or complex aspects of our reading, and to provoke thoughtful responses from your fellow students.
Short Paper55%Two significant papers are required in this course. Assignments will be provided in advance.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Reading ScheduleWeeklyWeek 1 Introduction
• Twain, “A Telephonic Conversation”
• Christopher Keep, “Technology and Information: Accelerating Developments”

Week 2 Railway Mania
• [Stanley], “Opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railroad”
• Dickens, “A Flight,” “Railway Dreaming”
• Rossetti, “Travel Sonnets”
• Wordsworth, “On the Projected Kendal and Windermere Railway”

Week 3 Detecting the Future
• Eliot, The Lifted Veil
• Doyle, “The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter”

Week 4 The Romance of Telegraphy
• “Kate: An Electro-Mechanical Romance” from Lightning Flashes and Electric Dashes
• Punch, selections on the Atlantic cable
• “The Atlantic Wedding-Ring.” Blackwood’s Oct 1858: 458-61.
• “Within a few hours…” London Times July 27, 1866.
• “The success of the Atlantic cable…” London Times July 30, 1866.

Week 5 Secrets and Surveillance
James, In the Cage

Week 6 Playing with History
Twain, Connecticut Yankee, Preface-Chap XXIV (5-189)

Week 7 Hello Central!
Twain, Connecticut Yankee, Chaps XXV- XLIV (190-356)

Week 8 Global Networks
Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days
First paper due

Week 9 Electro-Magnetic Spiritualism
Corelli, A Romance of Two Worlds

Week 10 Historical Induction
Kipling, “Wireless”

Week 11 Iterating the Victorian Future
Wells, The Time Machine

Week 12 History with a Difference
Gibson and Sterling, The Difference Engine: First, Second, and Third Iterations (3-246)

Week 13 Neo-Victorian Computing
Gibson and Sterling, The Difference Engine: Fourth, Fifth Iterations and Modus (247-486)

Week 14 Remaking the Past
Grimly, Gris Grimly’s Frankenstein

Week 15 Writing Workshop

Week 16 Final paper due

wjmille3 (Wed, 23 Mar 2016 18:12:05 GMT): The enrollment here needs to be changed to "35." Also, the following SIS codes need to be included: 16ENGLBA English BA 16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRW English BA- Creative Writing 16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLM English BA- Film 16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWR English BA - Language, Writing , and Rhetoric 16ENGLBA-16ENGLTED English BA-Teacher Education 16ENGLBA-16ENGLM English BA- Minor
n51ls801 (Mon, 14 Nov 2016 18:15:52 GMT): Rollback: -for editing some form entries
Key: 7198