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Viewing: ES 150 : Water and the Environment

Last approved: Thu, 15 Oct 2015 08:40:44 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 09 Oct 2015 14:39:55 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
ES (Environmental Science)
150
032222
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Water and the Environment
Water and the Environment
Division of Academic and Student Affairs
Enviromental Science (24ES)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
William E. Winner
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture5050No50 students
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This interdisciplinary course focuses on the essential role of water in supporting all life on earth, and the expected impacts of rapidly changing water resources. Aspects of water issues will include physical sciences and engineering, life sciences, and social sciences. Case studies outline the importance of water in the global context and in specific settings, including North Carolina. The course will help prepare students for living in a rapidly changing world.

Course Justification


Water is a precious earth resource that is essential for all life on earth.  The distribuiton of water resources is rapidly changing affecting climate, the distributions of plants and animals, agricultural production, forest ecosystems, ocean chemistry, and the availability of freshwater to growing human populations.   


Currently, there is no generally available course on the basic issues of water that is available to large numbers of undergraduate students.  Students in the proposed course will learn of the importance of water for life on earth, the nature of change occurring with water resources, and the future challenges and opportunities connected to water use and management. 


The proposed course will be open to all students on campus, and will be proposed as a GEP course in the categories of Interdisciplinary Perspectives, and in Global Knowledge. 


Water and the Environment will be offered as an interdisciplinary course that addresses the global scale issues of water and includes physical science and engineering, life science, social science, and case studies.  More specifically, themes include:


1.  Science and Engineering



  • The water molecule and its properties

  • The global hydrologic cycle including pools and fluxes of water resources

  • Water cleaning and distributon systems (case study, eg. water use at NC State University)


2.  Life Sciences



  • Water in the bioshpere

  • Water uptake and use by plants and animals

  • Water in agriculture and foresty (case study, eg. water use in production agriculture & Oglalla Aquifer)

  • Water and human populations (case study, eg. Water use in sub-Sahara Africa)


3.  Social Sciences



  • Water and sustainable social systems

  • Water policies in the U.S. (case study, eg. New Orleans)

  • Water and international relations (case study, eg. Middle East)

  • Water and economic values


4.  Other examples of key issues and case studies (examples)



  • Sea level rise in North Carolina

  • Drought in California and the southwestern U.S.

  • Eutrophication of the Neuse River

  • Ocean acidification

  • Melting of the Polar Ice Cap


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Outcome 1. Define fundamental concepts of water including its physical properties, global cycle, use by plants and animals, use by humans, and socioeconomic values.
 
 
Means of Assessment. Student understanding of the role of disciplines to the environmental issues of water will be assessed with two written examinations during the semester and a final examination. Each examination will have questions requiring students to define discipline-specific terms within the context of the course themes, and terms used in the examinations will be from specific disciplines.

Examples of discipline specific terms students explain or define on examinations:
"Hydrologic Cycle" (The answer should include information outlining the importance of separate disciplines including physics, chemistry, biology)

"Oglalla Aquifer" (The answer should include information from specific disciplines including geology, agriculture, sociology, business/economics)
 
 
Outcome 2. Develop systems views of water use and management using concepts from multiple disciplines and across/between multiple cultures. The course will involves disciplines organized in three general areas: 1) physical sciences and engineering; 2) life sciences; and 3) social sciences. Within physical sciences and engineering, disciplines covered will include chemistry and physics of water, and the engineering necessary to move and supply water for human use. Life science disciplines include the biogeochemistry of the water cycle, and the processes of water use by plants (including agriculture and forestry) and animals (including humans). The social science disciplines will include the economics, sociology, political, cultural, and ethical issues of water use by humans.
 
 
Means of Assessment. Student ability to identify and apply connections between two or more disciplines will be assessed with two written examinations during the semester and a final examination. The examination will require students to define and explain terms by connecting disciplines.

Examples of specific, interdisciplinary terms students could find on examinations include:
“Water management ” (Answer should connect information from disciplines such as public policy/physical sciences, business)

“Safe drinking water” (Answer should connect information from disciplines including engineering, biology, chemistry, public planning and policy)
 
 
Outcome 2. Develop systems views of water use and management using concepts from multiple disciplines and across/between multiple cultures.
 
 
Means of Assessment. Students will take two examinations during the semester, and a final examination. Correct answers to some questions will require students to understand and reason with interdisciplinary perspectives. Examples of interdisciplinary questions will focus on questions developed from case studies in areas such as:

"Identify qualities needed for the water supply system for the new residential development, Chatham Park, to be located in Pittsboro, NC." (Answer should integrate thinking around engineering a water system that includes a water budget, the anticipated growth of the development, costs of providing water services, and the sources of revenue to provide drinking water, water for sanitary sewers, and storm water management.
 
 
The course will be offered as an interdisciplinary course that addresses the global and regional scale issues of water including physical sciences and engineering, life sciences, social sciences, and case studies
 
 
Course content for this team-taught course will includes lectures, assigned readings, and discussions. The general structure of the team teaching the course will include 1) a physical scientist or engineer to develop materials on physical and engineering aspects of water and its use; 2) a life scientist (either plant sciences or zoology) to cover material in the hydrologic cycle, water use in agriculture and ecosystems, and physiological use of water by organisms; and 3) a social scientist with expertise in water use to cover material on the politics, economics and business issues, cultural values, and sociological factors of water use by humans.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Outcome 5. Demonstrate how the cultural and historical context of water issues in the global context of human population growth affects the change in water demands between nations. The course will discuss the predicted patterns of human population growth mapped across the predicted changes in the global hydrologic cycle. Course content will show how cultural differences in water use between ethnic groups, and the history of water conflicts between nations and ethnic groups, are predicted to change.
 
 
Means of Assessment. The ability of students to compare global change impacts between nations and cultures is assessed in the two examinations during the semester and a final examination. An example of a short answer question is:
“Explain how and why the United States and Saudi Arabia differ in managing water resources." (Answer should contrast the political, economic, cultural, and climatic differences between these nations, and include the relationships between these nations)
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 
Outcome 2. Develop systems views of water use and management using concepts from multiple disciplines and across/between multiple cultures.
 
 
Means of Assessment. The assessment of historical trends in human water use will be assessed in the two examinations, and a final examination. An example short answer question is:
“Explain how water use in at the site of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yellow River in China has changed during the past two decades, and how humans are affected.” (Answer should review the use of water in the landscapes along the Yellow River now submerged by the reservoir, the social and environmental changes resulting from the dam, and the future risks from siltation and flooding on human populations)
 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
None
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Introduction to Water Resources and the Environment - K.L. Pennington & T.V. Cech
Edition: 3rd
ISBN: 9780521869881
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

RESOURCES FOR THIS COURSE INCLUDE $5,000 FOR A LEAD INSTRUCTOR WHO WILL RECRUIT THREE INSTRUCTORS TO TEAM TEACH THE COURSE. AN ADDITIONAL $6,300 IS NEEDED TO FOR ADD-ON TEACHING LOAD FOR THE THREE INSTRUCTORS.

Student Learning Outcomes

1. Define fundamental concepts of water including its physical properties, global cycle, use by plants and animals, use by humans, and socioeconomic values.              


2. Develop systems views of water use and management using concepts from multiple disciplines and across/between multiple cultures.


3. Improve abilities in analytical thinking and communication about water and environmental issues.


4. Demonstrate how changes in water resources globally and locally will bring change to careers and personal lives.


5. Demonstrate how the cultural and historical context of water issues in the global context of human population growth affects the change in water demands between nations


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Exam30 pointsExam 1 -Objective exam with multiple choice, T/F, and short answer questions. This exam counts for 30 of the 120 total points for the course.
Exam30 pointsExam 2 - Objective exam with multiple choice, T/F, and short answer questions. This exam counts for 30 of the 120 total points for the course.
Exam50Final - Objective exam with multiple choice, T/F, and short answer questions. This exam counts for 50 of the 120 total points for the course.
Attendance10 pointsAttendance is required, and students start with 10 attendance points. Two unexcused absences are allowed, after which each unexcused absence results in loss of two attendance points. After seven unexcused absences (two allowed, and five penalized), the student loses the 10 attendance points. There is no limit on excused absences. Students that earn all attendance points earn 10 of 120 total points for the course.
Other0The course grades will be straight letter grades, with no plus or minus grades.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Weel 11 WeekThursday: Course Introduction and Chapters 1 & 2 - Water Perspectives and Water of Early Civilizations
Week 21 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Chapter 3 - Hydrologic Cycle (Chemistry of water & hydrologic cycle

Thursday: Lecture & Discussion: Chapter 3 - Hydrologic Cycle (The rapidly changing hydrologic cycle)
Week 31 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion: Chapter 4 - Water Quality

Thursday: Lecture & Discussion, Chapter 5 - Watershed Basics
Week 41 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Chapter 6 - Groundwater

Thursday: Lecture & Discussion, Chapter 10 - Dams and Reservoirs
Week 51 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Chapter 11 - Drinking Water and Wastewater Treatment

Thursday: Exam 1
Week 61 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Chapter 7 - Lakes and Ponds (Hydrology and Ecosystems)

Thursday: Lecture & Discussion, Chapter 8 - Rivers and Streams (Hydrology and Ecosystems)
Week 71 WeekLecture & Discussion, Chapter 9 - Wetlands (Hydrology and Ecosystems)

Lecture & Discussion, Outside Reading - Water Use by Plants (Water uptake and transpiration)
Week 81 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Outside Reading - Water Use by Plants (Ecosystems)

Thursday: Lecture & Discussion, Outside Reading, Water Use by Plants (Agriculture)
Week 91 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Outside Reading - Water Use by Animals

Thursday: Lecture & Discussion, Outside Reading - Water Use by Humans
Week 101 WeekNo Class - Spring Break
Week 111 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Outside Reading - Connecting a Rapidly Changing Hydrologic Cycle to Life Systems

Thursday: Exam 2
Week 121 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Chapter 12 - Water Allocation Law

Thursday: Lecture & Discussion, 13 - Roles of Federal, Regional, State, and Local Water Management
Week 131 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Chapter 14 - Water Conflicts, Solutions, and Our Future

Thursday: Spring Break - No Classes
Week 141 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Outside Reading - Gobal Water Use Issues

Thursday: Lecture & Discussion, Outside Reading - National Water Use Issues
Week 151 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Outside Reading - National Water Use Issues

Thursday: Lecture & Discussion, Outside Reading - Water Use in North Carolina
Week 161 WeekTuesday: Lecture & Discussion, Outside Reading - Water Use at NC State University

Thursday: Lecture & Discussion, Course Summary

kkharris (Tue, 14 Apr 2015 18:16:28 GMT): Comments from DASA CCC 04.13.2015 -Outcome 2 in Objectives 2 and 3 need to match and be updated in the syllabus and in CIM. “Team taught” needs to be more defined. Elaborate on who will be contributing to the course, and what they will be contributing (ie. Information, lectures, and readings). -As an Interdisciplinary Perspectives course, the multiple disciplines need to be clearly defined as to what they are and how they will be addressed. The committee also suggested identifying only a few main disciplines as this will provide a clear view of the course for future reviewing committees. -As a Global Knowledge course, the course needs to clear state how it incorporates cultural world views. o For objective 3 a member suggested using outcome 5 as it seemed more appropriate than outcome 2. -Grading needs clarifications needed o Between quizzes and exams are different or interchangeable. § This needs to be accounted for in the syllabus and course action. o Grading scale needs clarification § Points or percentages o Needs to state the course does not use plus/minus grading if going against the University adopted standard of utilizing plus/minus grading. § This should also be updated in the syllabus. -Attendance policy may need further review.
kkharris (Tue, 14 Apr 2015 18:17:12 GMT): Rollback: Please see course reviewer comments
gmneugeb (Wed, 29 Apr 2015 12:07:20 GMT): Rollback: Issue with email.
Key: 7200