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Viewing: FL 492 : Senior Seminar in Foreign Languages & Literatures

Last approved: Wed, 20 May 2015 08:39:07 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 19 May 2015 20:06:05 GMT

Change Type
FL (Foreign Languages)
492
032202
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Senior Seminar in Foreign Languages & Literatures
Senior Seminar in Foreign Lang
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Foreign Languages & Literature (16FL)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Seminar3.0
Course Attribute(s)
Capstone

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
Yes
2
 
 
6
John Mertz
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Seminar1515Non/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: FLJ 301 or FLC 301 or FLN 301 or FLA 301
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16FLLASIANConcentration in Asian LanguageRequired
Senior seminar for foreign language majors with concentration in non-European / less-commonly taught languages. Focus on recent trends in scholarship, career guidance, senior research projects or equivalent. Conducted in English. Students will be required to provide a detailed summary of their project in the language of their concentration.

Currently, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures offers senior seminars in three concentrations: Spanish (FLS 492), French (FLF 492), and German (FLG 492).  These are advanced courses taught in the target language with topics chosen to represent the specialized research fields of the teaching faculty, and offering a venue for students to complete senior research papers.  For the newly proposed concentration in Asian languages we propose an alternative format to address the specific post-graduation needs of our students. Given that many of the texts that have come to define the field of Asian studies were originally written in Western languages, and given that the concerns of scholars of language and culture in Japanese, Chinese, Hindi/Urdu, and Arabic overlap immensely, it makes sense to offer this course in English, make it available to all students within the concentration, and encourage students to learn from the experiences of their classmates' respective language and regional interests. The three basic components of this course will be: (a) to give students an overarching perspective of the recent history of scholarship held in common among specialists in these languages and their associated languages and cultures; (b) to provide students with career guidance to assist them after graduation, whether they choose to remain in academia or seek careers in government, industry, or NGO sectors; and (c) to provide a venue for students to complete a senior research project in their field. Ancillary objectives include providing a venue for students to gain experience at academic conferences; providing opportunities to meet with established professionals in the field; and fostering a sense of community among students in these languages. The course will be conducted in English; students will be required to provide a detailed summary of their senior paper in the language. This course will not preclude the addition, at a later date, of senior seminar courses that are specific to the individual target languages, and more closely follow the existing formats for Spanish, French, and German. This course will be open only to students in the concentration.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

The course will be taught by the four T/TT faculty in Asian languages, and will be added into their course rotation by reducing the number of offerings of FL 495, Special Topics.

This course is a senior seminar designed for students who are majoring in foreign language and concentrating in non-European, less-commonly taught languages (e.g., Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Hindi/Urdu, etc.).  Students of these languages face many common issues, both in methodological approaches (to the languages and their associated literatures and cultures) and in the issues they will face professionally after graduation. The three main objectives of the course are: (a) to give students an overarching perspective of the recent history of scholarship held in common among specialists in these languages and their associated languages and cultures; (b) to provide students with career guidance to assist them after graduation, whether they choose to remain in academia or seek careers in government, industry, or NGO sectors; and (c) to provide a venue for students to complete a senior research project in their field.  Ancillary objectives include providing a venue for students to gain experience at academic conferences; providing opportunities to meet with established professionals in the field; and fostering a sense of community among students in these languages.  The course will be conducted in English; students will be required to provide a detailed summary of their senior paper in the language of their major.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the courses students will be be able to:


1. Describe the arc of recent developments in scholarship relating to the study of non-European languages and their associated literatures, cultures, and histories.

2. Summarize and present the arguments of selected recent studies in this field.

3. Write a proper review (in English) of an academic book or substantive article.

4. Produce a senior paper, i.e., a rewritten and polished version (in English) of a paper that the student wrote for an advanced class pertaining to the major.

5. Produce a substantive synopsis, in the language of the student's major, of the senior paper or of the submitted book review, and in conjunction with the student's major advisor.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Multiple exams15% x 2Midterm and Final
Major Paper30%Capstone paper (in English)
Short Paper15%Précis of capstone paper (in language of concentration)
Participation25%Seminar discussion of assigned readings
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Unit 1: The Community as a Concept: Transitions to ModernityWeeks 1-2Primary Readings:
(from:) Benedict Anderson. Imagined Communities. 1983.
Secondary Readings:
Prasenjit Duara. Rescuing History from the Nation. 1995.
Homi Bhaba. Nation and Narration.
Partha Chatterjee. Empire and State.
Carol Gluck. Japan's Modern Myths.
Sheldon Garon. Molding Japanese Minds.
Unit 2: Otherness and the OrientWeeks 3-4Primary Readings:
from Edward Said. Orientalism. 1978.
Secondary Readings:
Masao Miyoshi, et al.: readings on early Meiji Japanese encounters with the West.
Lydia Liu, et al.: readings on 19c Chinese encounters with West.
Dipesh Chakrabarty, et al: readings on South Asian enounters with West.
Unit 3: Discourse and Social Institutions Invented CultureWeeks 5-6Primary Readings:
from Thomas Kuhn. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. 1962
from Michel Foucault. The Order of Things. 1966.
Secondary Readings:
Tomoko Masuzawa. The Invention of World Religions. 2005.
Timothy Mitchell. Colonising Egypt. 1988; Rule of Experts. 2002.
Talal Asad. Formations of the Secular. 2003.
Clifford Geertz. The Interpretation of Cultures. 1973.
Yoshikuni Igarashi. Bodies of Memory. 2000.
Unit 4: Problems of TranslationWeeks 7-8Primary Readings:
from Emily Apter. Against World Literature (2013).
Secondary Readings:
Lydia Liu. Tokens of Exchange. 2000.
Joseph Jacobson. The Invention of Religion in Japan. 2012.
Unit 6: The Development of Capitalism as a World SystemWeeks 11-12Primary Readings:
from Immanuel Wallerstein. The Modern World System (v.2). 1980.
from Andre Gunder Frank. ReORIENT: Global Economy in the Asian Age. 1998.
Secondary Readings:
Kenneth Pomeranz. The Great Divergence. 2000.
Roy Binh Wang. China Transformed. 1997.
Unit 7: Material CultureWeeks 13-14Primary Readings: tba
Secondary Readings:
Theodore Bestor: studies of Japan's bluefin tuna industry.
Unit 8: Economic Implications of Social Diversity.Week 15Primary Readings:
Pierre Bourdieu. Distinction. 1979.
Secondary Readings:
Janine Sawada. Practical Pursuits. 2004.

Key: 7219