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Viewing: NTR 210 : Introduction to Community Food Security

Last approved: Wed, 08 Mar 2017 09:02:45 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 07 Mar 2017 20:37:17 GMT

Change Type
Major
NTR (Nutrition)
210
032427
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Introduction to Community Food Security
Community Food Security
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Food Bioprocessing and Nutrition (11FS)
Term Offering
Summer Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
4
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
NTR 495Summer 20104
NTR 495Fall 201011
NTR 495Spring 20119
NTR 495Summer Session II 20147
Course Delivery
Online (Internet)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
5
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)
SVL (Service Lrng)
Students complete a service-learning experience in the community as a major component of this online course because it allows the students to apply academic learning related to the complexity of food security and multidisciplinary perspectives to actual nonprofit organizations who are engaging in such work. Students select an agency with efforts to achieve community food security, and this agency is approved by the course instructor. After receiving approval to complete service with the agency, the students interview an agency leader about the history of the organization, current efforts to help clients achieve food security, and future plans for the organization. Students complete a discussion board in which they reflect upon their interview and read and comment on other students' interviews, comparing and contrasting the agencies' efforts. This assignment helps students to learn about agencies other than just their own. Students then complete 15 hands-on service hours with their community partner agency, and a representative from the organization verifies these service hours. Through this service, students are asked to observe strengths and limitations to the agency's efforts and submit a proposal to the instructor, highlighting proposed changes to the community partner's efforts. Critical thinking skills are encouraged, and to further improve their proposals, peers in their small group critique the plan for feasibility, providing online evaluations through a discussion board post. Once again, this engagement with peers' proposals allows students to understand efforts of agencies other than those that they personally observed. Students take peer and instructor feedback and adapt their plan, submitting the final plan for evaluation by the instructor. Finally, students write a critical reflection paper to reflect upon how (1) the academic learning about community food security gained through the course was either reinforced or challenged through the service-learning experience, (2) how the service-learning experience reinforced or challenged personal beliefs or ideals surrounding community food security, (3) how the service-learning experience either reinforced or challenged their perceptions about tactics used to empower historically disadvantaged groups of people, and (4) how the service-learning experience demonstrated the complexity of inter-personal relationships and the feasibility of collaboration to achieve community food security.
If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Dr. Natalie K. Cooke
Teaching Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC5050NoN/A
None

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
11NTSBSNutrition ScienceElective
11NTSANApplied NutritionElective
This introductory interdisciplinary course teaches students about the many facets of food security in the United States, including historical impacts of race and social class on food security; food justice and food accessibility; the roles of non-profit organizations, government agencies, and disciplinary experts in developing food security efforts; and approaches to developing programs and policies, federal to local, to address the problem. In addition, service-learning experiences in students own communities allow them to gain knowledge about the specific agencies approaches to community food security, critically reflecting upon the experience and creating their own community food security action plan.

Community Food Security—access to affordable, nutritious, and culturally appropriate food for all people at all times—is a rapidly expanding area of interest that combines concerns regarding basic issues of nutrition and health with broader issues of rural and urban economic development and sustainable agricultural production. This interdisciplinary course teaches students about the many facets of community food security, including the history of race and social impacts on food security; food justice and food accessibility; the roles of non-profit organizations, government agencies, and disciplinary experts; and approaches to developing programs and policies—federal to local—to address the problem. Disciplines discussed include: nutrition science/nutrition education, food science, sociology, horticulture, crop science and agroecology, architecture, and public policy. While not all disciplines in the university are represented in faculty expert videos, students will be asked to reflect upon their own discipline's role in solving this large-scale societal problem through a critical reflection paper. In addition, the service-learning experience allows students to gain knowledge about one community food security non-profit agency of their choosing. Ultimately, all students will see how their unique disciplinary skill set can have an impact on community food security and how they can partner with others to make a broader impact. 


Further, 14% of U.S. households are food insecure, meaning that they do not know where they will obtain their next meal. This is especially true in minority groups have have been historically disadvantaged. In this course, we will discuss the impacts of historical racial inequalities and their impact on food justice, the concept that disadvantaged communities can empower themselves to make community-level changes to impact both individual and community food security. Building upon this historical context and exploring tactics to achieve food justice in these populations, students will engage in a service-learning experience where they will see these inequalities, reflect upon factors that impact these inequalities, and participate in and evaluate efforts to help communities achieve both community food security and food justice. 


Yes
Liability Insurance - $15 (because students will be traveling to service-learning sites using their own transportation)
Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
- Discuss how different disciplines (e.g. nutrition, food science, sociology, horticulture, agroecology, crop science, public policy, architecture) evaluate and attempt to solve community food security, using tactics to approach different levels of the social ecological model.
 
 
Critical Reflection Paper Prompt:
You have learned about different disciplines' (nutrition, food science, public policy, agroecology, crop science, architecture, sociology, and horticulture) approaches to achieving community food security. Now it is time to think about your own role in community food security. In a 1500-2000 word critical reflection essay, respond to the following prompts. Be specific in your descriptions, giving concrete examples.

1. Describe Your Discipline: What is your discipline and what do professionals in your discipline typically do? What skills are unique to your discipline?
2. Disciplinary Role in Community Food Security: Explain how your discipline might used this expertise and approaches to solve the problem of community food security.
3. Multidisciplinary Role in Community Food Security: With what other disciplinary experts might experts in your field collaborate? What role would each of these experts play in collaboration?
4. Personal Role in Community Food Security: What career do you plan to pursue? How might you use the influence of your job and your disciplinary skills to help the community achieve community food security?
5. Personal Skill set: What skills do you currently have that might help you achieve community food security from a disciplinary perspective? What skills do you still need to gain? Who actions might you take to build your knowledge and skills to help achieve community food security?
 
 
- Compare and contrast how different academic disciplines (e.g. nutrition, food science, sociology, horticulture, agroecology, crop science, public policy, architecture) view the solutions and challenges to achieving community food security, within the given community.
 
 
Example Test Question (Essay):
New Orleans, LA is a port city with a history of European, Caribbean, and African influences. Much of the city of New Orleans was destroyed when Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in 2005 and levees broke, flooding the city. New Orleans’s economy depends largely on the money spent by the 8-9 million tourists who visit the city every year. Even though these tourists spent a record $6 billion dollars in 2012, rates of food insecurity in Louisiana still continue to rise.

Recall Candy Chang’s “I Wish This Was” project. As part of New Orleans’s Revitalization Taskforce, your job is to create an organization that could help transform the landscape of New Orleans to help achieve community food security while maintaining cultural integrity. This organization will include multiple programs. In your description of the organization, you should:

1. Describe 1 program that is an adaptation of a program discussed in the course.
- How will it transform the landscape of New Orleans? (What will it replace to become what the community “wishes it was?”)
- Is this program a stop-gap or long-term sustainable program and how so?
- How will this program help achieve community food security?
- How will this program maintain cultural integrity?
- What multidisciplinary professionals will be needed to start and maintain programming?
- What role will each of these professionals play in programming?
- What are the specific intended outcomes of this program?
- How will you measure success?

2. Describe 1 program that is unique to your organization (something we have not discussed yet).
- How will this program transform the landscape of New Orleans? (What will it replace to become what the community “wishes it was?”)
- Is this program a stop-gap or long-term sustainable program and how so?
- How will this program help achieve community food security?
- How will this program maintain cultural integrity?
- What multidisciplinary professionals will be needed to start and maintain programming?
- What role will each of these professionals play in programming?
- What are the intended outcomes of this program?
- How will you measure success?

3. Given your knowledge of this urban, port city that is below sea-level, list 2 barriers that you anticipate encountering as you begin implementing your programs. How will your organization overcome these barriers?
 
 
- Given a scenario, distinguish how each discipline (e.g. nutrition, food science, sociology, horticulture, agroecology, crop science, public policy, architecture) would approach a community food security problem and explain how different disciplines would work together to address said problem.
 
 
Example Test Question (Essay):
Think back to the social ecological model we discussed in Unit 1. Pick one factor, featured in this model, that impacts food security. Then, pick 3 of the disciplines that we discussed in Unit 2 (nutrition, food science, sociology, horticulture, agroecology, crop science, public policy, or architecture) and discuss how each would approach solving this problem, using specific examples of their disciplinary expertise. What unique skills would each bring to the collaboration? Then, discuss how the three would collaborate to create a multidisciplinary approach to alleviating that problem.
 
 
Nutrition/Nutrition Education, Food Science, Sociology, Architecture, Horticulture, Agroecology/Crop Science, and Public Policy
 
 
As part of a 2013-2014 DELTA grant, Dr. Natalie Cooke and Dr. Suzie Goodell consulted with faculty experts in food science (Dr. Eduardo Gutierrez-Rodriguez), nutrition extension (Lorelei Jones), sociology (Dr. Jill Waity - UNCW), architecture (Erin White and Sara Glee Queen), agroecology/crop science (Dr. Michelle Schroeder-Moreno), horticulture (Liz Driscoll), and public policy (Dr. Maureen Berner - UNC Chapel Hill) in the development of the course. We interviewed each of the faculty about the role of their discipline in community food security, how they collaborate with others in the discipline, and career opportunities in the discipline related to food security. These faculty experts also selected appropriate readings to help students understand each of these disciplines' roles in approaching community food security efforts. Dr. Cooke also plans to interview Dr. Bob Patterson (Crop Science), Dr. Dara Bloom (Sociology - Local Foods), and Dr. Sarah Bowen and Dr. Annie Hardison-Moody (Sociology - Food Access) to add to the expert video lectures. These will be added to the syllabus after the videos have been created. Unit 1: In the beginning of the course, we introduce students to a socio-ecological model articulated to community food security, containing short videos explaining different approaches to improving/obtaining community food security. At that point in time, we introduce the concept that different disciplines focus on different aspects of community food security. Unit 2: To more deeply explore each discipline's approach to community food security, we recorded interviews from experts (faculty mentioned above), asking them the same questions related to how their discipline (and they themselves) addresses the challenges associated with community food security. Readings of lay and research articles suggested by the experts are used to supplement students' understanding of each discipline (see syllabus). At the end of this unit, students will complete a critical reflection paper that will allow them to reflect upon their discipline's role in community food security, what skills they can bring to a multidisciplinary community food security effort, and with whom they might collaborate in such efforts. Unit 3: In the last section of the course, we provide students with examples of real-life organizations/ partnerships that are addressing community food security. With each video case study, students identify the ways each discipline is engaged the the community food security effort, discussing the benefits and challenges associated with a multidisciplinary partnership. Throughout the course, students will engage in a service-learning experience that will allow them to interact with experts from a variety of disciplines.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
- Describe the history of food inequalities in the United States from a racial and social class perspective and the role of food justice in empowering these historically disadvantaged groups.
 
 
Example Test Questions (Essay):
1. Define community food security, using Mike Hamm and Anne Bellows’ definition. Using the definition, create and describe a community in which community members are food insecure. Explicitly explain how the qualities of the community relate to the each of the components of the Hamm-Bellows definition of CFS. Make sure to describe the impact of race and social class on the community.
2. Race and social class are two factors that impact community food security. Using the social ecological model as a guide, describe how race impacts 5 other factors in the social ecological model. Make sure to label each factor by the level of the social ecological model. Then, do the same for social class. Make sure to label each of these 5 factors by the level of the social ecological model. You will have a total of 10 factors, and they must each be distinct, without overlap.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
- Describe how the service-learning experience either reinforced or challenged their perceptions about tactics used to empower historically disadvantaged groups of people.
 
 
Through the service-learning experience, students will have an opportunity to work with a diverse group of individuals, both community partner leaders and the clients that the community partner agency serves. Students will engage in these interactions through their service-learning experience, and they will reflect upon these interactions:

Critical Reflection Paper Prompts:

Now that you have completed your service-learning experience, take time to reflect upon your experience. In a 1500-2000 word reflection essay, respond to the following prompts. Be specific in your descriptions, giving concrete examples. Please type the question before your answer.

1. Describe your service experience. What were the activities you engaged in while in the community? With whom did you interact? Provide specific examples.

2. In the beginning of the course, we stipulated that your service experience should be relevant to community food security. Briefly discuss why you think your service activities were relevant. (NOTE: All things are reflection worthy. While some service may initially appear irrelevant, your community partner clearly did not think so, otherwise they would not have asked you to serve in that way.)

3. Describe a time when your service experience either reinforced or contradicted what you learned about the role of race and social class on community food security. How did this experience reinforce or challenge your view of the community/individuals in the community or community food security efforts?

4. Give an example of when you saw individuals from two different disciplines working together. How effective was this collaboration? What skills did each bring to the table? How did this experience affect your view of the community/individuals in the community or community food security efforts?

5. Reflect on this: What assumptions, expectations, values, beliefs, or convictions did you bring to your service experience? How did they affect what you thought, felt, decided, or did during your service experience? To what extent did these assumptions, expectations, values, beliefs, or convictions prove true? If they did not prove true, why was there a discrepancy? (You can reflect on scrap paper or in your head). Now, use your reflection to answer these questions:

A. Describe one assumption, expectation, value, belief, or conviction you brought to your service experience.
B. How did your service experience reinforce or challenge this assumption, expectation, value, belief, or conviction?
C. How might this assumption, expectation, value, belief, or conviction positively and/or negatively affect your interactions with others or your decisions in other areas of your life, personally or professionally, now or in the future?
Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
See syllabus.
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Agriculture and Life SciencesDr. Helen Kraus and Dr. Michelle Schroeder-MorenoBoth Drs. Kraus and Schroder-Moreno support the NTR 210 course and state that it differs from the previously approved HS/CS 410 course. See attachment for e-mail communication.
At this time, the course will only be taught during the summer because Dr. Cooke's teaching load is full for the fall and spring semesters.

This objective of this interdisciplinary service-learning course is to introduce students to the topic of food security, a public health problem that impacts the 14% of the U.S. population that is food insecure and is more prevalent in subsets of our population that have been historically disadvantaged (e.g. certain races and social classes). In order to achieve community food security, it will require interventions on the local, national, and international level, led by multidisciplinary experts. Therefore, this course seeks to introduce students to the complexity of community food security through lectures, readings, virtual field trips, and interactive online learning modules. Building upon this knowledge of the complex social ecological approach to food security, students will hear from a team of experts in nutrition, food science, sociology, public policy, architecture, horticulture, agroecology, and crop science about their disciplinary and multidisciplinary perspectives through expert video lectures. Students will critically reflect upon the role of their own discipline in helping to achieve food security and how their discipline might collaborate with other disciplines. The final section of the course will introduce students to a variety of community food security agencies through local, regional, and national video case studies. Throughout the course, students will apply academic knowledge learned in the course to complete a service-learning experience in their own community. Assignments will focus on the strengths and limitations of their agency's efforts to impact community food security, and students will critically reflect on the feasibility of these efforts through a series of assignments. At the end of the course, students should have an appreciation and an experience with the complexity of community food security efforts and an idea of how they can use their own skills to collaborate with other disciplines to decrease the number of food secure individuals in the U.S. 


Student Learning Outcomes

Overall Student Outcomes


At the end of this course, students should be able to:



  • Describe the history of food inequalities in the United States from a racial and social class perspective and the role of food justice in empowering these historically disadvantaged groups.

  • Explain the complexities of community food security using the social ecological model as a framework to understand the interconnection of causes of food insecurity.

  • Articulate the roles of and interactions between individuals, groups, and organizations who contribute to obtaining community food security, classifying their efforts as either stop-gap or long-term sustainable approaches.

  • Discuss how different disciplines (e.g. nutrition, food science, sociology, horticulture, agroecology, crop science, public policy, architecture) evaluate and attempt to solve community food security, using tactics to approach different levels of the social ecological model.

  • Compare and contrast how different academic disciplines (e.g. nutrition, food science, sociology, horticulture, agroecology, crop science, public policy, architecture) view the solutions and challenges to achieving community food security, within the given community.

  • Given a scenario, distinguish how each discipline (e.g. nutrition, food science, sociology, horticulture, agroecology, crop science, public policy, architecture) would approach a community food security problem and explain how different disciplines would work together to address said problem.

  • Discuss the limitations of and challenges faced when implementing community food security programs using one discipline's approach when compared to another discipline's approach.

  • Differentiate between urban and rural efforts to solve community food security based on environmental differences and different disciplinary approaches to overcoming these environmental differences.

  • Using the case studies as a guide, discuss the complexity of multiple partners coming together to solve problems, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of multi-agency partnership.

  • Using the case studies as a guide, discuss the challenges and limitations agencies face in creating and sustaining community food security programming.

  • Using the case studies as a guide, recommend best practices in developing, implementing, evaluating, and sustaining community food security programming.


Service-Learning-Based Student Outcomes


At the end of this course, students should be able to:



  • Discuss the strengths and limitations of a community partner’s current approaches to achieving community food security and ending individual food insecurity.

  • Identify and describe current limitations to achieving food security efforts within the given community.

  • Devise a proposed plan to overcome community limitations to achieving community food security within the context of the given community.

  • Critique the realistic nature of proposed plan to achieving community food security, given acquired knowledge about the current state of community food security.

  • Collaborate with peers to critique the effectiveness of community food security in a given community.

  • Collaborate with peers to determine similarities and differences between different communities’ approaches to food security.

  • Describe how academic learning about community food security gained through the course was either reinforced or challenged as a result of the service-learning experience.

  • Describe how the service-learning experience reinforced or challenged personal beliefs or ideals surrounding community food security.

  • Describe how the service-learning experience either reinforced or challenged their perceptions about tactics used to empower historically disadvantaged groups of people.

  • Describe how the service-learning experience demonstrated the complexity of inter-personal relationships and the feasibility of collaboration to achieve community food security.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes120Students complete twelve quizzes over the course of the semester:

• Quiz 1: A Place At the Table Movie
• Quiz 2: Grocery Store Tours
• Quiz 3: Complexity of Food Security
• Quiz 4: Nutrition and Food Security
• Quiz 5: Food Science and Food Security
• Quiz 6: Sociology and Food Security
• Quiz 7: Architecture and Food Security
• Quiz 8: Horticulture and Food Security
• Quiz 9: Agroecology & Crop Science and Food Security
• Quiz 10: Local Food Security Case Studies
• Quiz 11: Regional Food Security Case Studies
• Quiz 12: National Food Security Case Studies

Each quiz will be worth 10 points.
Written Assignment90Students will complete two personal reflection papers over the course of the semester:
• Disciplinary Role in Food Security Reflection – 30 points
• Service-Learning Critical Reflection – 60 points
Multiple exams450Students will take an exam for each unit of the course:
• Unit 1 – Community Food Security and Food Justice
• Unit 2 – Multidisciplinary Views
• Unit 3 – Local, Regional, and National Case Studies
Each exam will be worth 150 points.
Project340For their service-learning experience, students will identify a community partner agency in their community, have the agency approved by the instructor, and then complete 15 hours of service, which will be verified by the community partner. To reflect upon the experience, students will complete a series of assignments including:
• Identification of Potential Community Partners – 10 points
• Community Partner Agreement Qualtrics Survey – 15 points
• Interview Reflection Discussion Board (Original Post) – 75 points
• Interview Reflection Discussion Board (Critique Posts) – 50 points
• Devise a Plan Discussion Board (Original Post) – 75 points
• Devise a Plan Discussion Board (Critique Posts) – 50 points
• Adapt Your Plan Report – 50 points
• Completion of Hours Verification Qualtrics Survey – 15 points
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Unit 1 - Community Food Security and Food Justice33%The first unit is students’ first introduction to community food security. In this unit we will explore concepts of food security, food justice, and food accessibility and consider the history of food insecurity from a racial and social class perspective. We will discuss differences in individual and community food security as well as stop-gap and long-term sustainable approaches to food security. Using the social ecological model as a framework, we will explore the complexity of community food security, and students will see that achieving community food security is a challenge that involves consideration of inter-connected factors on the individual, local, national, and international levels.
Unit 2 - Multidisciplinary Views33%With the foundational knowledge about the complexity of community food security, we will explore how multiple disciplines approach community food security efforts, including: nutrition, food science, sociology, public policy, agroecology, crop science, architecture, and horticulture. Through video interviews with experts in each of these areas, we will explore the role of each discipline in community food security efforts, what methods professionals in these disciplines use to impact community food security, what jobs exist in the discipline related to food security, and with whom these experts collaborate to achieve a multidisciplinary approach to community food security. Students will see that disciplinary experts employ various approaches but they all agree that working together using multidisciplinary action plans is the only way to solve food insecurity.
Unit 3 - Local, Regional, and National Case Studies33%Students will recall that many of the speakers in Unit 2 discussed organizations that are successfully helping alleviate food security in communities around the nation. In Unit 3 we will explore some of these programs through short video case studies at the local, regional, and national levels. Case studies include: Inter-Faith Food Shuttle, A PACKed Kitchen, Neighbor-to-Neighbor Outreach, DHIC, Boys and Girls Club, Urban Ministries of Wake County, Raleigh City Farm, Agroecology Education Farm, NC State Dining, Feed the Pack Food Pantry, Galley Grocery, Brown Bag Ministries, North Raleigh Ministries, Urban Ministries of Durham, Shepherd’s Table Soup Kitchen, Catholic Parish Outreach, The Well-Fed Community Garden, Kirk Community Garden, Voices Into Action, Advocates for Health in Action, UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Community Food Lab, Second Saturday, Jamie Kirk Hahn Foundation, Alliance Medical Ministry, Oak City Outreach, NC Farm to School, No Kid Hungry NC, NC Growing Together, North Carolina Breastfeeding Coalition, Farm to Childcare, NC Food Bank, EFNEP, EFNEP’s Farm it Forward Program, NC Steps to Health, NC-4H, Wayne Food Initiative, Appalachian Foodshed Project, Feast Down East, Food Corps, St. Anthony Foundation, Project Open Hand, Sustainable Food Center, Growing Power, and South Central Farm. Students can gain 10 points extra credit on an exam by creating their own video case study, using these other case study as an example.

cdaubert (Thu, 01 Sep 2016 16:56:35 GMT): Rollback: PI request for rollback.
nkcooke (Wed, 28 Sep 2016 21:03:31 GMT): Rollback: instructor requested
aeherget (Tue, 24 Jan 2017 18:44:01 GMT): AECHH: Uploaded syllabus and adjusted points at instructor's request via email 1/24/2017.
aeherget (Thu, 09 Feb 2017 13:31:20 GMT): AECHH: Uploaded syllabus at instructor's request via email 2/8/2017.
Key: 7417