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Viewing: CE 703 : Economic Analysis of Transportation Systems

Last approved: Mon, 12 Mar 2018 08:01:32 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 07 Mar 2018 14:53:19 GMT

Change Type
Major
CE (Civil Engineering)
703
032563
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Economic Analysis of Transportation Systems
Econ of Transp Sys
College of Engineering
Civil Engineering (14CE)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Odd Years
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
3
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
CE 795-001 / 601Fall 20157 / 1
CE 595-002Fall 20135
CE 595-002Fall 201211
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
George List
Professor
full

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture77NoGraduate students
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC55NoGraduate students


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Transportation economics in terms of its supply and demand, costs, pricing, and regulation, especially the way in which the theory of economics in the marketplace and for public and private firms applies to the transportation market given its unique characteristics.

Understanding transportation economics is critical for transportation engineering majors given the central role played by transportation in terms of supporting societal activities. This includes the costs, internal and external, of providing transportation services, the pricing of transportation services, and the sources of income that support transportation activities. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
Poole College of ManagementXiaoyong Zheng, Steve AllenEcon program did not find any overlap with their courses.
Poole College of ManagementDon WarsingThis course has only minor overlap with what I used to teach in MBA 542, and maybe even less for Eda. Moreover, as a 700-level course, it is being taught at a level of depth and mathematical rigor that is well beyond what we would ever do in an MBA course. Actually, there is a lot more overlap with Mike Kay's course, but he has approved.
Part of normal faculty teaching load

The primary objective is for students to learn the mathematical models of and theories concerning the economics of transportation supply and demand from the perspective of service providers (both public and private), users (both freight and passenger), the government, and society at large. This includes cost estimation, assessment of benefits and costs, accounting for externalities, economies of scale, scope, and density, pricing, social welfare, and the interaction between transportation costs and land use.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to. . .



  • Explain transportation economics in terms of supply and demand, costs, pricing, and regulation, especially the way in which the theory of economics in the marketplace and for public and private firms applies to the transportation market given its unique characteristics.

  • Formulate mathematical models of the demand for transportation services

  • Design pricing strategies for transportation facilities that meet specific economic goals and objectives

  • Formulate mathematical models of the supply of transportation services

  • Calculate the contributions of various factors of production to the cost of transportation services

  • Formulate models that account for the externalities created by transportation systems and their operation

  • Calculate the social welfare associated with various transportation service pricing and capacity investment options


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Test50%Mid-term (20%) and final (30%)
Short Paper20%Prepared in accordance with journal paper requirements.
Homework30%10 short homework assignments
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction1 weekLecture and discussion
Demand Analysis2 weeksLecture, discussion and homework
Firm Economics2 weeksLecture, discussion and homework
Competition, Concentration, and Market Power2 weeksLecture, discussion and homework
Regulation, Deregulation, and Efficiency1 weekLecture, discussion and homework
Transportation Investment1 weekLecture, discussion and homework
Welfare Effects1 weekLecture, discussion and homework
Congestion Pricing1 weekLecture, discussion and homework
Transportation and Land Use1 weekLecture, discussion and homework
Problem Review Sessions2 weeksLecture and discussion
Exam Reviews1 weekLecture and discussion
gflist 02/11/2018
1) The second sentence in the syllabus has been added to the CIM. I think it is important to include because the class is taught in the context of transportation economics in the US. And students who are from abroad either need to understand how transportation demand and supply arises in the US or they need to understand those concepts in the context of another country.
2) The student outcomes are now the same in the CIM and the syllabus.
3) The syllabus now contains a complete description of the textbook.
4) The typo on page 2 of the syllabus has been corrected. Thanks for catching this.
5) The admonition about late assignments now reads: "Assignments will be accepted for up to one week past the due date. Other situations will be considered on a case-by-case basis."
6) The additional references provide more detail about some of the topics covered in the class. They also trace the history of work in this area, especially the work by Vickery, and they provide additional perspectives about transportation economics that are slightly different from those of the book's author.
7) Courses taught by the Economics department have been checked, and there is nothing similar. The classes with content closest to that in the class are ECG 561 - Intermediate Econometrics, ECG 750 - Introduction to Econometric Methods, ECG 751 - Econometric Methods, and ECG 752 - Time Series Econometrics. But all of these classes focus on the methods involved in doing econometric analyses, they do not, and probably should not, illustrate those methods exclusively in the context of one application domain, whereas this class does that, on purpose.
8) The syllabus has been updated.

Thanks for the comments and feedback.

mlnosbis 11/13/2017:
1) The sentence at the end of the prerequisite statement on the syllabus can be added to the end of the catalog description in CIM if you want to make sure students are aware of this requirement.
2) There are more student learning outcomes in the CIM form than on the syllabus. They should be the same in both locations.
3) Syllabus notes:
- Textbook information should include year, author's full name, and publisher.
- Typo on pg. 2 "Course Overviewe"

pjharrie - 11/16/17 - I don't have much to add beyond Melissa's remarks, although I do wonder about the second sentence of the pre-/corequisities. Also, are the additional references required? Also, is there a penalty for late assignments?

It also seems like this needs concurrence from Economics.

ABGS Reviewer Comments 2/19/2018:
- late assignments are accepted up to one week of the due date, but no penalty is specified, which seems an odd policy, so much so that I wonder if the penalty was inadvertently omitted. Instructor should list a penalty if there is one.
- There is a typo in Homework description "stive" should be "strive."
- Is transportation needed to attend the field trips? I think a few words need to be added to the catalog description to make it a complete sentence.

gflist (02/21/2018)

- The text about late assignments has been changed to show what partial credit will be given.
- The missing "r" in "strive" has been added.
- There was a mistake in the course structure indicating that there would be field trips. There are none. The text indicating that there were field trips has been removed.
ranji (Sat, 29 Oct 2016 18:05:43 GMT): Information about prior offering will likely be requested as this review goes forward; suggest holding this proposal until history is available to report.
ranji (Sat, 29 Oct 2016 18:09:58 GMT): Rollback: Data from prior offering as special topic would likely be requested as this proposal moves forward. Suggest holding this until that data is available.
sarumug (Fri, 28 Apr 2017 18:15:23 GMT): Rollback: Please revise.
Key: 7670