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Viewing: HI 337 : Spy vs. Spy: Cold War Intelligence History

Last approved: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:18:27 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 27 May 2016 18:31:51 GMT

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Major
HI (History)
337
032288
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Spy vs. Spy: Cold War Intelligence History
Spies: Cold War Intelligence
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
History (16HI)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Daniel P. Bolger
Teaching Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture7070NoThis would be similar to the current HI 335: The World at War, offered each spring term.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC3535NoAs with HI 335: The World at War, this course would be offered simultaneously in the classroom and via DELTA.

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16HISTBAHistory-BAElective
16HISTBSHistory-BSElective
16HIMHistory MinorElective
This course will examine the often deadly intelligence efforts that characterized the Cold War (USA vs. USSR) of 1945-1991. While the history of that era marks the major political, economic, and military events, much occurred in the shadows. This wide-ranging intelligence competition affected - and was affected by - both American and Russian societies and cultures. Drawing on selected readings, this course will seek to describe this struggle to know and to conceal, and offer useful context to explain how and why it influenced the course of the Cold War.

This new course introduces N.C. State University students to the history of intelligence efforts during the Cold War of 1945-1991.  It will be particularly relevant to students majoring or minoring in History, International Studies, and Political Science, but will also be of interest to a wide range of students, to include those enrolled in Air Force, Army, Navy, and Marine Corps ROTC.  It is of particular value to those pursuing topics in American and or Russian history and politics.  The course fills the gap between HI 252:  Modern American History and the senior seminars on European (HI 420) and U.S. foreign policy (HI 454).  HI 252 is not a prerequisite, as this course is designed to be open to non-majors, and so does not require entry with skills specific to history majors.   The course develops archival research skills for all students, taking full advantage of the extensive collections and rich databases of the D.H. Hill library.  Development and delivery of this course fulfills part of the university's responsibilities as a member of the Intelligence Community Center of academic Excellence (IC-CAE) funded by the United States Defense Intelligence Agency.  The course offers an excellent venue to allow N.C. State University students to be more knowledgeable and aware of the often unseen yet vital role of intelligence matters in the United States, Russia, and the wider world.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
1. Describe and assess the definitions, nature, and relevant history of intelligence activities. Societies organize themselves across time and space, and intelligence organizations reflect these cultural origins. We will look at similarities and differences across the Cold War as both America and Soviet Russia developed approaches and institutions to gain advantages. Each side had strengths. Each side had weaknesses. These played out as the Cold War unfolded.
 
 
The course has two required research papers (4-5 pages). Each paper will require the student to assess a book: John Le Carre's A Perfect Spy (U.S./UK point of view) and then Viktor Suvorov's Inside the Aquarium (Russian point of view). The student will assess each book as if an officer in a U.S. or Soviet intelligence organization. The student may choose either perspective, and any agency in either country. In each paper, the student will briefly explain who wrote the book, what the book discusses, and why it matters (or doesn't matter) to the student and his or her counterparts in his or her particular intelligence entity as well as to those of the opponents. This interpretation will require the student to draw on course lectures as well as course readings. In addition, as the student makes the assessment, he or she is expected to use at least two primary and two secondary sources. This allows in-depth use of the D.H. Hill Library collections and databases.
 
 
Examine and appraise the value of primary sources in describing the personal experience of intelligence operations in the Cold War, making assessments on the basis of the perspectives of key U.S. and Soviet intelligence agencies.
 
 
The course has two required research papers (4-5 pages). Each paper will require the student to assess a book: John Le Carre's A Perfect Spy (U.S./UK point of view) and then Viktor Suvorov's Inside the Aquarium (Russian point of view). The student will assess each book as if an officer in a U.S. or Soviet intelligence organization. The student may choose either perspective, and any agency in either country. In each paper, the student will briefly explain who wrote the book, what the book discusses, and why it matters (or doesn't matter) to the student and his or her counterparts in his or her particular intelligence entity as well as to those of the opponents. This interpretation will require the student to draw on course lectures as well as course readings. In addition, as the student makes the assessment, he or she is expected to use at least two primary and two secondary sources. This allows in-depth use of the D.H. Hill Library collections and databases.
 
 
Explain and evaluate the characteristics of intelligence in World War II and assess how key people, important institutions, and useful methods were adopted by each of the major powers as the Cold War began.

Identify and analyze the nature and development of U.S. and Soviet intelligence capabilities in the early years of the Cold War, culminating in the Cuban Missile Crisis on 1962.

Summarize and synthesize the intelligence challenges of the later Cold War (1962-1991), and account for the societal, institutional, and technological aspects of each side's periods of ascendancy and decline.
 
 
The course requires three in-class tests. Each test addresses one of the periods (origins of the Cold War, early Cold War 1945-1962, and later Cold war 1962-1991) as described in the learning objectives above. The tests consist of three segments, offering a mix between objective and subjective material drawn from the readings and lectures.
1. Map terms (20%): The student will place ten of fifteen items on an outline map sheet provided. This assists the student in learning the geographic relationships that underlie key events in the history of Cold War intelligence.
2. Short answers (40%): The student will choose four out of six terms. For each selection, he or she will write a single-paragraph summary of a term's identification (who, what, when., where) and significance (why it matters). This allows the student to assimilate and relate basic factual information relevant to a deeper understanding of trends and developments across time and space in Cold War intelligence history.
3. Essay (40%): The student will choose one of three broad essay questions. For the chosen essay, the student will develop an argument and marshal specific supporting evidence from lectures and readings to reinforce the thesis presented.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
N/A
Leadership in the Public Sector (LPS) resources support this offering. Dr. Amanda Edwards has agreed to provide resourcing in a similar manner to that developed for HI 335: The World at War for the spring term schedule in 2015 and 2016. Dan Bolger has no scheduled history courses in the fall term, so he is available to teach this course.

Students will:


1.  Strengthen their scholarly, critical perspective on the rise, course, and resolution of the U.S./USSR Cold War through the focus of intelligence competition, technologies, and institutions, with particular attention to the societal and cultural aspects present in each country during the period.


2.  Strengthen their ability to apply sound historical reasoning to analysis of how and why the Cold War arose from trends present before, during, and after the Second World War.


3.  Strengthen their ability to apply sound historical reasoning to assess the nature and development of US. and Soviet intelligence capabilities in the early Cold war, culminating in the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962.


4.  Strengthen their ability to think critically in determining why the Cold War ended as it did in 1991, and just what role intelligence efforts did and did not play in that outcome, and how these developments affect our contemporary world.


5.  Strengthen their ability to apply historical research methods in using primary and secondary sources to evaluate and understand the reliability and utility of representative readings.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the semester, the students will be able to:


1.  Describe and assess the definitions, nature, and relevant history of intelligence activities.


2.  Explain and evaluate the characteristics of intelligence in World War II and assess how key people, important institutions, and useful methods were adopted by each of the major powers as the Cold War began.


3.  Identify and analyze the nature and development of U.S. and Soviet intelligence capabilities in the early years of the Cold War, culminating in the Cuban Missile Crisis on 1962.


4.  Summarize and synthesize the intelligence challenges of the later Cold War (1962-1991), and account for the societal, institutional, and technological aspects of each side's periods of ascendancy and decline.


5.  Examine and appraise the value of primary sources in describing the personal experience of intelligence operations in the Cold War, making assessments on the basis of the perspectives of key U.S. and Soviet intelligence agencies.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Test60%There will be three in-class tests.
Short Paper40%There will be two 4-5 page research papers.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached syllabus.See attached syllabus.See attached syllabus.

Key: 8047