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Viewing: HS 410/CS 410 : Community Food Systems

Last approved: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 12:30:51 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 12:30:47 GMT

Change Type
Major
HS (Horticulture Science)
410
032278
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
Yes
Course Prefix:
CS
Community Food Systems
Comm. Food Sys.
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Horticultural Science (11HS)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
15
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Michelle Schroeder-Moreno, Rebecca Dunning
Associate Professor, Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture4040NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite:Junior or senior standing
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
? proposed degree programAgroecology and Sustainable Food SystemsRequired
This course explores the economic, socio-cultural, policy and health perspectives of community food systems using a multidisciplinary and systems-level framework. Students will use a systems framework to critically examine local and global food challenges related to food insecurity, food justice and food sovereignty, food waste and sustainable approaches to addressing food challenges. Novel aspects of this course include student experiential learning opportunities that include service learning with community partners addressing local food challenges, team building through group work and in-class discussion and development of personal food ethic provocative proposition.

The availability of food is determined by economic, social, cultural, and political factors. Using a systems approach, students will critically examine how these factors affect local and global food challenges.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesSarah BowenI think that the course is different from mine, in terms of content and readings, and that they would complement each other. My course focuses more on social relations while your will focus on a systems framework. However, I do think the description does make it sound the same. I wonder if it could be revised a little to emphasize the systems part more, or to show in some other way that these are complementary (not the same - because they're not) classes. I think that would be good for both of us because a lot of the same students might want to take them. (Mine is being taught in the spring so that is good too).
No new instructional resources are needed for this course. The faculty teaching the course will have this as part of their normal teaching load as assigned by their department heads.

Students will learn to critically examine local and global food challenges related to food insecurity, food justice and food sovereignty, food waste and to develop sustainable approaches to addressing these food challenges. 


Student Learning Outcomes

1.    Identify food system components and the economic, political, social, and cultural factors that interact with them.


2.    Discuss the diversity of perspectives involved in food systems and community participatory approaches to engage them.


3.    Describe innovative food system models and projects from local and global examples.


4.    Apply class knowledge and direct engagement with community partners to develop a personal food ethics.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Written Assignment100Four papers at 25 points each will focus on key concepts in community food systems
Oral Presentation100Group presentation based on a topic developed by the group an approved by the instructor.
Other100Service learning project that will require 4 hours of volunteer time
Other100Food system perspective survey of two individuals with different roles in food systems
Participation50• 50 pts: Regularly contributes to the discussion by raising thoughtful questions, providing examples from the readings, building on others’ ideas, expanding the class’ perspective, and appropriately challenging others’ assumptions and perspectives.
• 25 pts: Sometimes contributes to the discussion in the aforementioned ways.
• 0 pts: Rarely or never contributes to the discussion in the aforementioned ways.
Attendance50• 50 pts: Misses no more than 2 classes without an excused absence,
• 0 pts: Misses 3 or more classes without an excused absence
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Course overviewone weekCourse syllabus and familiarize yourself with moodle course
The Big Food Challengesone weekREAD:
• Ackerman-Leist (2013)- Preface, Introduction
• Godfray (2010)
• WRI
Defining the Food System one weekREAD:
• Ackerman-Leist (2013)- Chapter 1, 2

DUE: Service Learning Paper 1
Community at the Center of Food Systems one weekREAD:
• Conner & Levine (2006)
• Feestra (1997)

DUE: Perspectives Paper 1
Community Participatory Action and Engagementone weekREAD:
• Guthman (2008)
Food System Drivers- Production and Wasteone weekREAD:
• Ackerman-Leist (2013)- Chapter 4
Food System Drivers- Food Security and Healthone weekREAD:
• Ackerman-Leist (2013)- Chapter 6
• Hamm (2008)
Food System Drivers- Food Justiceone weekREAD:
• Ackerman-Leist (2013)- Chapter 7
• Mares et al. (2012)

DUE: Perspectives paper 2
Food System Drivers- Food Justice (cont.) and Farm Workersone weekREAD:
• Brown and Getz (2011)
• CA Inst. Rural Studies (2007)
WATCH:
• Harvest of Shame
Food System Drivers-Food Sovereignty at a Global Scaleone weekREAD:
• TBA
• La Via Campesina Website.
Food System Drivers-Politics and Powerone weekREAD:
• Muller et al. (2010)
• Occupy the Food System

DUE: Perspectives Paper 3
Food System Drivers- Educationone weekREAD:
• Merrigan (2008)
• Vallianatos (2004)

DUE: Complete Service Learning Activity
Food System Drivers-Marketplace Values and the Consumerone weekREAD:
• Ackerman-Leist (2013)- Chapter 9, 10
• Day-Farnsworth (2009)

DUE: Service Learning Paper 2
Developing Solutions- Putting It All Back Togetherone weekREAD:
• Ackerman-Leist (2013)- Chapter 11, 12

DUE: Perspectives Paper 4
Group Presentationstwo weeks

jjmullah (Tue, 27 Oct 2015 19:00:02 GMT): Rollback: Rollback
kkharris (Wed, 28 Oct 2015 19:45:48 GMT): Rollback: Per Robin Clements request. 10/28/15
Key: 8205