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Viewing: CNR 250 : Diversity and Environmental Justice

Last approved: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 08:01:57 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 08:01:57 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
CNR (College of Natural Resources)
250
032339
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Diversity and Environmental Justice
Div & EJ
College of Natural Resources
Forestry (15FOR)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
3
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
IPUS/295Spring/201527
IPUS/295Fall/201521
IPUS/295Spring 201633
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)
QEP (TH!NK)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Dr. Thomas R. Easley
Director of the Community for Diversity

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
DiscussionN/A25NoWe may need multiple sections in the near future.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Differences between people can impact how they see one another and engage with one another. In this class we talk about those differences and address numerous facets of diversity to pique the curiosity of the students. As we learn together, we investigate content that can influence dynamics (how we feel) and we explore different ways to investigate environmental justice issues. This course is designed to create a safe learning environment for reflection, engagement, risk-taking, and the development of personal awareness while looking at how each individual can improve environmental justice. 75% of the seats will be restricted for CNR students.

This course satisfies both the interdisciplinary and US Diversity General Education requirements. This course provides a safe space for students to learn with one another and from two multi-talented and intricately skilled professionals who understand diversity and inclusion on intrinsic levels. Further, bringing in professionals that work on Environmental Justice from outside NCSU and across NCSU guarantees that students learn about this topic. 


We have taught this course now for three semesters. This course continues to get more and more requests. The course was designed for CNR students, and now that both CNR and NCSU (university wide) students have taken this course there is more desire to earn the credits offered by this class.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will recognize demographic and cultural indicators to consider when environmental justice is at risk during resource management decision processes.
 
 
Students will participate in an activity that helps demonstrate how people participate in policy development.

White tailed Deer suffer from Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) that is an acute, infectious, often fatal viral disease of some wild ruminants. Because of its very high mortality rate, EHD can have a significant effect upon the deer population in a given area, reducing numbers drastically.

The class will be broken up into five groups.

Deer Hunters- care about the quality of the resource, hunting or taking pictures of wildlife, abundance of hunting opportunity, and being able to go into a plot of land to hunt a deer. They want the best and what’s great for the ecosystem, relatively untouched land. So, what is the point? Hunters want a lot of deer and a lot of opportunity. Also, they want the deer herd to be healthy.

Deer Farmers- They want to stay in business and make money, being able to transport deer from farm to farm, having low regulations when moving deer. A lot of paperwork to be focused on health, regulations, and legally turning a profit. Most dislike any regulations.

General Assembly- It is in your best interest to get re-elected. True, but most of their motivation is based on the cervid industry being PERCEIVED as a business. Politicians always want to be perceived as supporting business. Usually, they are ignorant on wildlife issues.

People that enjoy wildlife for its intrinsic value- on the outside of the issue are not very well educated. The public usually like to look at deer and care about deer, but don't know much about managing habitat. Further, The public is uneducated about EHD.

NC Wildlife Resources Commission- Is responsible for managing white-tailed deer. Also, their funding comes from hunting license sales. So, they want the white-tailed deer population to be healthy and they want to convince hunters that the population is healthy.

Now each group has a stake in policies that impact the management of deer. Students will develop important points that they feel policy makers need to know in order to make decisions.

As a class we will analyze what is important to each group and why. Then after the students present their work, we will go back and explore how each group's perspective impacts them and then impacts others. Then we will design campaigns that can be more inclusive the others' perspective so that they can practice using aspects of diversity in their decision making.

Students will be graded based on how well they identify and challenge their own biases toward the issue and toward an outside group. Then students will re-develop campaigns that are inclusive of others' perspective because now that they are aware what others are concerned about, they can be more inclusive and strategic in what they present. Students will be graded on how they strategize and present their work.

They will be graded by a Fisheries and Wildlife Professor, a Forestry professor who teaches forest history and environmental impact assessment, and a representative from the Conservation Fund that works with communities to enhance environmental and economic outcomes.
 
 
Students will be able to identify cultural and demographic factors that indicate or lead to environmental injustice.
 
 
Students will use Geographic Spatial Technology to map the relationships among stakeholders and relative positions in space and time between North Raleigh and Southeast Raleigh.

Then the students will take an excursion. On this excursion students will visit Whole Foods near Wade Avenue; then we will visit a supermarket in Southeast Raleigh and a grocery store off Poole Road.

ASSIGNMENT IS BELOW
On this excursion you are being asked to observe what you see in the different parts of Raleigh we will explore. Considering Diversity and Environmental Justice, we are inviting you to pay attention to the resources (financial, pharmacist, libraries), access to healthy foods/produce, and landscaping/quality of homes. Answer the following questions

1) Being near NC State’s Campus as compared to Southeast Raleigh make notes on what you see.

Old Buildings or new buildings



Renovations and gentrification



Notice how people are dressed

2) What does renovations and gentrification in various ways mean for the people living in the community, presently?


3) Pay attention to who you see from near NC State’s campus as we move toward Southeast Raleigh. Take an inventory on who you see and don't see based on ethnicity, age, socioeconomic-take a guess.




4) When we visit the grocery stores: make a list of what healthy food options/fresh produce, pharmaceutical options, prices of food, and who works in the store.
 
 

 
 

 
 
Natural Resources Management/Planning Cultural Geography
 
 
A variety of College of Natural Resources faculty and natural resource professionals will team teach this course, coming from natural resources, non-profits that work on environmental justice issues, and social science disciplines. Each lecture will be presented with supporting readings, study questions and research activities that propel students into a discovery process to extract further information to enhance their understanding of the diversity and environmental Justice.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Students will learn how race was socially constructed and explore how race impacts how value systems have been designed.
 
 
The first four weeks of class are designed to help students develop the capacity to have difficult discussions around issues of race and other topics (gender, sexual orientation).

Each of these classes will have interactive activities that illustrate how people interact based on their notions of race and privilege. Then students will watch the film (documentary) Race: The Power of An Illusion to learn that race is a social construct. After that they have to do an assignment of explaining how race and other identities they have have impacted their life choices. Then students work in focus groups to analyze their own work.
 
 
Students will be able to determine the extent to which environmental conditions have been affected by interconnections between natural resources, environmental management and issues related to power and privilege in our society.
 
 
One example is that students will learn from professionals at the Conservation Fund that will teach about working with disparate communities and landowners, helping them to gain control of their community and resources.

Toward the end of the semester students will read Margaret Wheatley's book Walk In Walk Out. They will be put into seven groups that will explore seven different chapters that focus on communities worldwide that developed their solutions to their environmental conditions. These communities all used creative and recreational methods to solve their problems. One of the key ideas for students to take away is that the communities realized that no one (government official or Hero/Shero) were coming to assist them.
 
 
Students will explore their own identities and see how they have been influenced by their lived experiences. Then students will see how those experiences influence their value systems, how they recreate, and how they engage or disengage with other populations.
 
 
Autobiographical Essay
This assignment has three sections: Purposes, Questions for Reflection, and Writing Directions. Please read all of these sections before you begin writing.
Purposes
1. To explore aspects of your identity such as race, class, ethnicity and/or cultural background, religion, gender, drawing on experiences in your life;
2. To consider what sparked your interest in environment and natural resources;
3. To explore your attitudes toward people who differ from you in race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic class, language, religion, and customs;
4. To explore the ways in which your attitudes toward people who differ from you were shaped by experience, institutions, and the people in your life.
Questions for Reflection
Reflect on the following questions and consider the significant events and people that have influenced your understandings of the environment, race, class, gender, and ethnicity.
1) Describe yourself, including your ethnic, class, and/or cultural background. What aspects of your identity are most important to you and why? (required part of the essay)
2) How did you come to be interested in the environment and natural resources? What aspects of your identity, people, places, and/or experiences have been important to you in developing this interest? (required part of the essay)
3) The items listed below are prompts to think about factors that are likely to have influenced your perceptions of, attitudes toward, and responses to people who are different than you. Address at least 2 or 3 of them. Think about which are important, whether there are other experiences that have been more important, and select the material you would like to address in your essay from that which is most important in your experience. (required part of the essay)
a) Early memories: What are your earliest recollections of people of other races or sexual orientation? How have these people influenced you to be the person you are today? Evaluate the impact of these encounters and what you made of them as a young person
b) Significant People: How have your parents and other relatives or close friends influenced your ideas about racism and sexism? How has your particular ancestry, family history, and interaction with others affected how you think about race and environment issues?
c) School: What events at school have been important in affecting your attitudes towards people of different races and economic classes? In elementary school? High school? College?
d) Work: In the jobs you have held, how have your co-workers or perhaps the customers affected your attitudes towards people of different races and economic classes? Have you experienced situations of conflict with people of different opinions from you? How did you address the conflict?
e) Religion/Spirituality: If you were raised with a religious/spiritual tradition, did it promote a particular orientation toward women and men, people of different races or sexual orientation? How did you feel about the church's position?
f) Many of you are not from Raleigh, NC. How does this place compare to where you grew up? In what sense do you feel at home and/or out of place? Why?
4) Some might suggest that silence is a significant barrier to addressing societal issues related to differences in race, class, gender, and ethnicity. That is, well-intentioned people do not speak up when they see an injustice occurring. Have you been silent in the past? If so, why? If not, why not? How do you think silence might contribute to conflicts associated with race, class, gender, and ethnicity in environmental and natural resource issues? (required part of the essay)
 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
25%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
75% of the seats will be restricted for CNR students because this course is designed to cross all of our departments. Some of the lectures will be led by professors in either the Forestry and Environmental Resources Department, Forest Biomaterials Department or Parks, Recreation, & Tourism Department.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
Yes
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
n/a
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Wheatley, Margaret. (2011). Walk Out Walk On: A Learning Journey into Communities Daring to Live the Future Now. Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Letter from the Birmingham Jail

Articles
Singleton, Glenn & Hays, Cynthia. Beginning Courageous Conversations about Race
Hanley, Jerome. (1999). Beyond the Tip of the Iceberg: Five Stages Toward Cultural Competence
Giller, Chip. (2007). Generating Change: Why Reaching a Diverse Environmental Citizenry is Important for the Future of the Environmental Movement
Ukpokodu, Nelly. (1999). Multiculturalism vs. Globalism
Floyd, Myron. (2001). Managing National Parks in a Multicultural Society: Searching for Common Ground.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Diversity, Environmental Justice- Taylor, Dorceta (2014). The State of Diversity in Environmental Organizations: Mainstream NGOs, Foundations & Government Agencies.
Gender Bias- Yurkiewicz, Ilana (2012). Study shows gender bias in science is real.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
Field Trips
One excursion is to go to North Raleigh and we will explore certain resources in this part of Raleigh. The resources we will look at are housing cost, grocery stores, drug stores and conditions of the schools.
We will then compare this to Southeast Raleigh where we will explore the same resources, but notice the difference in housing cost and the difference to organic/healthy produce between the two locations.

Lastly the second excursion will to attend an alternative high school in Southeast Raleigh to observe how the community supports this school and how they have developed their own community gardens. Further, students will see how limited access to recreational opportunities can impact youth academic performance.

Guest speakers will be Dr. Gary Blank from Forestry and Environmental Resources to address the impact of environmental justice on housing using Geospatial information Systems.
Dr. Med Byrd from Forest Biomaterials will address the impact of paper mills on communities and promote the practice of recycling
Dr. Sarah Warren will lead a session on the origins of the Environmental Justice Movement which started in Afton, NC.
Dr. Melissa McHale and Dr. Terrance Ruth will share a section. McHale will talk about global environmental justice and relate it to social justice. Ruth is a principal of an alternative high school and will share how resources in communities impact decision making. He will also talk about the creation of a community garden in Southeast Raleigh and the impact its had on the community. In addition, he will walk the students through the steps it took to get community buy-in on this collective initiative.
We will also have guest lecturers from the Conservation Trust (Melanie Allen) and the Conservation Fund (Mikki Sager & Marilynn Marsh-Robinson).
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Natural ResourcesThomas R. EasleyThis class is designed by multiple faculty in CNR, but led by Dr. Thomas R. Easley and Professor Milton (Mickey) Fearn. Easley is the College's Diversity Director.
College of Natural ResourcesMilton (Mickey) FearnFearn is in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism Department
Professor Fearn and Dr. Easley will co-lead this class. Therefore, assignments will be graded by both professors. Fearn is a retiree of the National Park Service and Easley has been teaching at NCSU for 12 years.

An objective is for Natural Resource Students to have a course in CNR that fulfills the US Diversity and Interdisciplinary GEPs. Another objective is for students explore their personal identities and to consider how society influences identity. Students will be challenged to think about the biases that develop as a result of identity and their upbringing. Students will explore how they experience the environment from their identity and explore how others experience the environment through their identity.


By the end of the course students will see that they can impact environmental justice by being more inclusive decision makers and strategic/critical thinkers. 


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to identify diverse stakeholders by strengthening capacity to engage across different example cases where environmental justice is a concern.


Students will be able to determine the extent to which environmental conditions have been affected by interconnections between natural resources, environmental management and issues related to power and privilege in our society.


Students will recognize instances where environmental justice is at risk during resource management decision processes.


Students will develop an increased awareness of the relationship between difference, privilege, tension and power in natural and social systems.


Students will be able to create a plan for decision making that fosters environmental justice.




 


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Written Assignment20%Students will do a Draft and Autobiographical Essays. Both are worth 10% of their grade. The purposes of this assignment is:
1. To explore aspects of your identity such as race, class, ethnicity and/or cultural background, religion, gender, drawing on experiences in your life;
2. To consider what sparked your interest in environment and natural resources;
3. To explore your attitudes toward people who differ from you in race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic class, language, religion, and customs;
4. To explore the ways in which your attitudes toward people who differ from you were shaped by experience, institutions, and the people in your life.
Written Assignment15%This is the students' Next Steps Plan assignment. Each student will develop a position paper concerning one of the case study topics examined during the course. A rubric for evaluation will emphasize attention to questions of diversity and the dimensions of the justice concerns demonstrated by the student's investigation.
Attendance25%Each session will involve active engagement with the topics and materials of concern. Students will work in teams and construct responses to prompts and questions generated by the session facilitator. Points will be awarded for being present and contributing to the team and collective effort.
Readings assignments20%Students will do a reflection to an article that is about Cultural Competence. They are to include in this reflection points that are gained from in class activities as well as viewing the film Race: The Power of Illusion.
Oral Presentation20%Students will do two assignments with the text book Walk In Walk Out.
First students will do individual presentation on this book. They will tie in what they have learned in the course and align it with the principles of this book. They will show how they have learned throughout the semester about diversity and what they see their role is as a global citizen to improve environmental Justice.
The next assignment is worth 10% and students will present in a group. They will highlight take aways from the Textbook- Walk in Walk Out by Margaret Wheatley. In this description the students will also bring in various points from lectures and excursions to develop their own theme from the chapter.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Diversity4 WeeksStudents will watch Race the Power of Illusion and learn three diversity models to enhance their capacity to communicate about diversity (Broadly and specifically).
Origins of Environmental Justice1 weekStudents will role play in Dr. Sarah Warren's display of explaining the beginning of the Environmental Justice Movement.
Conservation Trust and diversifying the conservation movement1 WeekMelanie Allen will walk the students through the origin of Conservation and explain why its important for the movement to diversify and become inclusive. She will illustrate with an in class demonstration on access to resources. Students will have different resources and will see how those resources impact who makes decision and who has voice.
Paper Science1 Week Dr. Med Byrd will lead

Students will learn the impact (positive/negative) paper industry has on communities. They will learn about pollutants and the paper process. Then they will learn about the jobs being provided by this industry.
Environmental Justice in urban areas1 WeekDr. Gary Blank will lead

Students will learn about urban impact on the environment and see how race and economic structures affect housing, education, and employment
Conservation Fund1 WeekMikki Sager and Marilynn Marsh-Robinson will lead.

Students will learn about Conservation Fund working with Disparate communities to provide resources and access to needed resources.

Further, students will see how they can contribute to assisting communities with their influence and resources.
Resource Management- White Tail Deer2 WeeksWorking on the White-Tail Deer Scenario
Students will be split into different stakeholder groups and present their cases about this issue.
Walk In Walk Out2-3 WeeksStudents will read Wheatley's book and develop their own solutions to solving real world issues. They will present on various parts of the book as a group and individually. Students will also approach this assignment from the perspective that they will not receive any federal or external help.

yplee (Fri, 20 Nov 2015 19:17:33 GMT): Rollback: Please make revisions based on the conversation at our college curricula committee.
Key: 8359