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Viewing: HI 253 : Early American History

Last approved: Wed, 21 Sep 2016 08:01:16 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 21 Sep 2016 08:01:16 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
HI (History)
253
032366
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Early American History
Early American History
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
History (16HI)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Spring 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Megan Cherry
Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture16020-120YesThe department offers its U.S. survey courses in various formats. These include a large lecture (120) with 6 discussion sections, and sections of 20, 35, or 70 students. HI 253 will be offered in all of the formats.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16HISTBAHistory BAElective
16HISTTEDHistory BA-Teacher Education ConcentrationElective
16HISTBSHistory BSElective
16HIMHistory MinorElective
Themes in early American history with an emphasis on diversity in the U.S.; focus on colonial clash and mix of cultures, generation of an American consciousness, federalism and democracy in national politics, expansion and immigration, and racial and sectional division. Credit is not allowed for both HI 253 and HI 251.

Creating a version of the U.S. survey with emphasis on diversity will provide many, needed new seats for the US Diversity GEP category.  The course will provide another option for Humanities & Social Sciences "Group II History" requirement, and another Humanities GEP option for other students. This course will be used in the pedagogical training of our Ph.D. program's students.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Examine the people, places, and events that shaped the early American past.
 
 
Essay writing. Example of an exam essay question:
By 1763, North American colonists possessed a dual identity; they were both British and also distinctly American. What factors contributed to this dual identity? What reinforced the British identity? What reinforced the American identity? Be sure to discuss political, cultural/social, and economic aspects of society.
 
 
Analyze primary sources, which offer an eyewitness perspective on what early America was like, and which form the basis of historical argument.
 
 
Integrative final essay. Example of a final essay paper topic:
Incorporating the assigned primary sources, and using multiple sources, compare Northern, Southern, and African-American attitudes and ideas about the growing divisions in the early republic, leading to the Civil War.
 
 
Construct thoughtful, evidence-based opinions and craft convincing historical argument.
 
 
Essay writing. Example of an essay question:
Explain how and why tobacco planters in the Chesapeake region came to rely on African slaves rather than European indentured servants over the course of the seventeenth century. At what point did the Chesapeake become a “slave society” rather than merely a “society with slaves?”
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 
Categorize and compare historical processes producing diversity, equality, and structured inequalities in early America.
 
 
Essay writing. Example of an essay question:
Example of an essay question: compare and contrast the demographically and politically different settlements in the Chesapeake and New England regions, in light of three (3) of the following categories: motives for emigrating, economies/labor systems, gender roles, religion, and relationships with neighboring Native Americans.
 
 

 
 

 
 
Examine interactions between people from different religious, gender, ethnic, racial, and class groups in early America.
 
 
Essay writing. Example of an essay question:
How did relationships between Native Americans and English settlers change over the course of the seventeenth century?
Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
see sample syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
see sample syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

The History department offers multiple sections of 200-level U.S. History.
Teachers of HI 253 will have it in their standard load, replacing HI
251. The number of seats of 200-level U. S. history will not be
affected. Tenure track faculty and second-year Ph.D. Public History
graduate students will teach HI 253 beginning in the Summer of 2016.

* Note: During their first year in the program, all Ph.D. graduate
students will TA for a large (120) section in both the fall and spring
semesters. The tenure-track faculty leading the course will provide
intensive mentoring to students serving as their TAs. The History
Department also requires all future HI 253 graduate student instructors
to complete a 1.0 credit hour course on teaching and pedagogy. Moreover,
the History Department strongly encourages all graduate students to
complete some teacher training programs available elsewhere on campus,
such as the COAT program.

students will:


1) Learn to read, think, and write historically about early American history.


2) Practice critical thinking by analyzing primary sources and secondary historical texts.


3) Develop writing skills by producing evidence-based argument.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1)  analyze and explain some of the political, military, environmental, social and cultural changes that transformed American life;

2)  analyze and explain the nature of encounters between native peoples, Europeans, and Africans;

3)  identify early American ideas about the nature of autonomy of peoples and the emergence of common "American" identity;

4)  identify and analyze early American ideals of equality and freedom;

5)  identify and analyze causes of the American Revolution, the expansion of the republic, and the origins of the Civil War.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation10Class Attendance and Participation. Excellent participants will thoroughly read and consider all of the class readings, engage their fellow students in respectful conversation, and offer considered comments from the readings.
Quizzes20Throughout the semester, we will have occasional pop-quizzes that cover material from the readings and lectures. Some quizzes will take the form of multiple-choice; others will be short identifications that require you to define and explain the significance of a historical person/event/concept.
Exam15The midterm exam will draw from readings and lectures. It will consist of one essay that requires you to bring together themes we have considered in the course.
Short Paper30One double-spaced paper of 5-7 pages on a topic to be circulated in advance by the instructor. Responses should draw on primary and secondary sources from the assigned readings.
Final Exam25The final exam will draw from readings and lectures throughout the entire semester. It will include a series of short identifications as well as two essays that require you to bring together themes we have considered throughout the entire course.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
see sample syllabus

aeherget (Fri, 16 Sep 2016 11:51:33 GMT): AECHH: Attached updated syllabus 9.16.2016
Key: 8619