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Viewing: IDS 220 : The Science and Art of Happiness

Last approved: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 11:50:50 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 24 Jun 2016 11:50:44 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
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Major
IDS (Interdisciplinary Studies)
220
032355
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
The Science and Art of Happiness
Happiness: Science & Art
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Interdisciplinary Studies (16IDS)
Term Offering
Summer Only
Offered Every Year
Summer 1 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
1
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
IPGK 295summer 2015, 10 weeks28
Course Delivery
Distance Education (DELTA)
Online (Internet)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
10
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture4
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Dr. Philipp Tavakoli
Teaching Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC5050Non/a
None
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Interdisciplinary inquiry into the nature of happiness; why it matters, how to promote it, and what harms it. The relevance of the body-mind connection for one's happiness. Current scientific insights into happiness from physiology, neuroscience, and psychology, as well as their connections to Aristotelian ethics and to the concept of suffering in Buddhism. Experiential component of the course consisting of scientifically supported techniques for daily practice for deepening the understanding of course materials and discussions.

The underlying aim of this course is for students to gain a better understanding of themselves not only as individuals but also as members of a diverse society, in the U.S. as well as globally. The elements and measures of Happiness and Well--] being are not universal. This course addresses the differences concerning Happiness among various cultures and among different groups within the U.S. On this topic, the GEP categories GK and USD complement each other. In particular, it can be helpful to students in their critical analysis of diversity issues in the U.S. to see how these issues unfold differently in other cultures. The GK perspective provides a basis for comparison and re-enforces the USD perspective, and vice versa. The course also meets the GEP requirements for IP, is open to all undergraduates without restrictions. Additionally, the course was piloted as a Special Topics course with strong enrollment (28) and positive evaluations (4.8 for overall course excellence at 89.7% participation rate).


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Explain and differentiate the distinct approaches to happiness in physiology, psychology, and ethics.
 
 
Responses to discussion prompts. Example prompts:
Explain how the role of time in the study of stress differs between physiology (the nervous system) and psychology (mindfulness).
Explain how Aristotle’s approach to “function” differs from the physiological approach.
 
 
Describe the mutual relevance of insights from physiology, psychology, and ethics into the nature of happiness.
 
 
Responses to discussion prompts. Example prompt: How would you apply what you learned about neuroplasticity to the relevance of compassion for one’s happiness?
 
 
Formulate a comprehensive, interdisciplinary model of the nature of happiness based on insights from physiology, psychology, and ethics.
 
 
Final term paper. Example prompt: What insights from physiology, psychology, and ethics into the nature of happiness could be combined to improve the happiness of the average college student?
 
 
Physiology, psychology, and ethics
 
 
1. Students will read materials from physiology, psychology, and ethics. 2. The instructor will provide lectures which connect the insights from the disciplines and facilitate students’ interdisciplinary learning. 3. Students will watch video excerpts from experts in these disciplines (TED talks etc.) such as Robert Sapolsky, Rick Hanson, Jon Kabat-Zinn, Dan Gilbert, Martin Seligman, Sonja Lyubomirsky, Matthieu Ricard, Richard Davidson. 4. Quizzes will test students’ knowledge and comprehension of the course materials. 5. Students will respond to the instructor’s discussion prompts about the disciplines and their interrelations, as well as to each other’s discussion posts. In these discussions, students will analyze and apply what they learned from the disciplines. 6. The final term paper gives students the opportunity to synthesize, evaluate, and apply what they learned from the the distinct disciplines.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Explain distinguishing characteristics, including ideas, values, economic structures, and/or attitudes of people in a society or culture outside the United States and how these characteristics relate to people’s happiness.
 
 
Responses to discussion prompts.
Example prompt: Analyze people’s values and attitudes towards diversity in Brazil and how these values and attitudes relate to people’s happiness.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Compare the distinguishing characteristics between the non-U.S. society and at least one other society as they relate to people’s happiness.
 
 
Responses to discussion prompts.
Example prompt: Compare and contrast the roles of women in the U.S. and in Northeast Thailand as the differences relate to economic structure, values, and women’s happiness.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Explain how gender, ethnic, racial, and/or age identities are shaped by cultural and societal influences and how these influences relate to people’s happiness.
 
 
Responses to discussion prompts.
Example prompt: Select one aspect of happiness that differs by gender in the U.S. and use this aspect to illustrate how cultural and societal influences shape the identities of genders in the U.S.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
Describe interactions between people from different, gender, ethnic, racial, and/or age groups in the U.S. and explain how these interactions relate to people’s happiness.
 
 
Responses to discussion prompts.
Example prompt: With regard to the Brown-Ferguson event, analyze the role of (dis-) trust in the interactions among different groups in the U.S. and how this (dis-) trust impacts people’s happiness.
Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
n/a
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
n/a
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
n/a
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
1. Satterfield, Jason M., Mind-Body Medicine: The New Science of Optimal Health. Jason Satterfield is a Professor of clinical medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.
2. Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want. Sonja Lyubomirsky is a professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside.
3. Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill. Matthieu Ricard is a French biologist and Tibetan Buddhist monk.
4. Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics, trans. F.H. Peters, M.A. 5th edition (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Truebner & Co., 1893). Available online for free at http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/903.
5. Current articles.
The instructor holds a PhD in political science with emphasis in political philosophy. He has been teaching interdisciplinary courses connecting science and ethics at NC State for 17 years, such as “IDS 201 Environmental Ethics” and “STS 302 Contemporary Science, Technology, and Human Values.”
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Week 1/Module 1:
Introduction to the Course and the Study of Happiness
1. Syllabus and the document "Discussion Requirements."
2. "Discovering the Key to Happiness" Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 1, “Is it possible to become happier?” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
3. "Is Happiness the Purpose of Life?" Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill, ch. 2, “Is Happiness the Purpose of Life?” (Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition, 2007).
4. “Weaving the Biopsychosocial Braid” Satterfield, Jason M., Mind-Body Medicine: The New Science of Optimal Health, ch. 1, “Weaving the Biopsychosocial Braid” (The Teaching Company, 2013).
5. "Discovering the Key to Happiness" Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 1, “Is it possible to become happier?” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
6. "Can you Make Yourself Lastingly Happier?" Seligman, Martin, Authentic Happiness, ch. 4, “Can You Make Yourself Lastingly Happier?” (Atria Books, 2004).
7. Handout: Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics, selections.
8. Current articles

Week 2/Module 2:
Willpower, Commitment and Habits, Emotions and Gratitude
1. "The River of Emotion" Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill, ch. 9, “The River of Emotion” (Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition, 2007).
2. "Committing to Your Goals." Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 8, “Committing to your Goals” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
3. “Agony and Ecstasy—Biology of Emotion” Satterfield, Jason M., Mind-Body Medicine: The New Science of Optimal Health, ch. 10, “Agony and Ecstasy—Biology of Emotion” (The Teaching Company, 2013).
4. "Positive Emotion." Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 10, “The First How: Positive Emotion?” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
5. "Disturbing Emotions: The Remedies” Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill, ch. 10, “Disturbing Emotions: The Remedies” (Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition, 2007).
6. Handout: Notes on Willpower by Baumeister and Tierney.
7. "Expressing Gratitude” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 4, “Happiness Activity No. 1: Expressing Gratitude” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
8. Handout: Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics, selections.
9. Current articles

Week 3/Module 3:
Sub-systems of the Body: function and interaction, Mind-Body connection, Stress, Depression, Suffering, Resilience and Coping.
1. “Fight or Flight vs. Rest and Digest” Satterfield, Jason M., Mind-Body Medicine: The New Science of Optimal Health, ch. 3, “Fight or Flight vs. Rest and Digest” (The Teaching Company, 2013).
2. Stress Statistics on college students (American College Health Association, report spring 2015).
3. “The Alchemy of Suffering” Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill, ch. 6, “The Alchemy of Suffering” (Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition, 2007).
4. Handout: Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics, selections.
5. “Taking Care of Your Body (Physical Activity)” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 9, “Happiness Activity No. 12: Taking Care of Your Body (Physical Activity)” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
6. “Simmering Soup—The Neuroendocrine System” Satterfield, Jason M., Mind-Body Medicine: The New Science of Optimal Health, ch. 4, “Simmering Soup—The Neuroendocrine System” (The Teaching Company, 2013).
7. "Developing Strategies for Coping” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 6, “Happiness Activity No. 6: Developing Strategies for Coping” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
8. “Nature vs. Nurture – Genes, Health, and Disease” Satterfield, Jason M., Mind-Body Medicine: The New Science of Optimal Health, ch. 6, “Nature vs. Nurture – Genes, Health, and Disease” (The Teaching Company, 2013).
9. Handout: fact sheet “Health & Diversity.”
10. Optional: "If You Are Depressed" Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, “Postcript: If You Are Depressed” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
11. Current articles

Week 4/Module 4:
Mind-Brain, Brain-Plasticity, Dis-ease, Mindfulness
1. “The Mind-Brain-Body Connection, or How Emotional Style Influences Health” Davidson, Richard, The Emotional Life of Your Brain, ch. 6, “The Mind-Brain-Body Connection, or How Emotional Style Influences Health” (Plume, Reprint edition, 2012).
2. “Avoiding Overthinking and Social Comparison” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 4, “Happiness Activity No. 3: Avoiding Overthinking and Social Comparison” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
3. “The Plastic Brain” Davidson, Richard, The Emotional Life of Your Brain, ch. 8, “The Plastic Brain” (Plume, Reprint edition, 2012).
4. “What is Mindfulness?” http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic/mindfulness/definition
5. “Taking Care of your Body (Meditation)” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 9, “Happiness Activity No.12: Taking Care of your Body (Meditation)” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
6. “The Veils of Ego” Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill, ch. 7, “The Veils of Ego” (Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition, 2007).
7. Handout: Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics, selections.
8. Current articles

Week 5/Module 5:
Virtue, Strength, Weakness, Pleasure, Self-Kindness
1. “Renewing Strength and Virtue.” Seligman, Martin, Authentic Happiness, ch. 8, “Renewing Strength and Virtue” (Atria Books, 2004).
2. Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics, selections
3. “What Kind of Goals Should You Pursue” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 8, “What Kind of Goals Should You Pursue” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
4. “Ethics as the Science of Happiness” Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill, ch. 22, “Ethics as the Science of Happiness” (Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition, 2007).
5. “Why Self-Compassion Trumps Self-Esteem.” http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/try_selfcompassion
6. “Savoring Life’s Joys” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 7, “Happiness Activity No. 9: Savoring Life’s Joys” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
7. Current articles

Week 6/Module 6:
Multitasking, Flow, Procrastination, Perfectionism, Self-Forgiveness
1. “Increasing Flow Experiences” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 7, “Happiness Activity No. 8: Increasing Flow Experiences” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
2. “The Conditions of Flow” Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly, Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, ch. 4, “The Conditions of Flow” (Harper, 2008).
3. “One with the Flow of Time” Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill, ch. 21, “One with the Flow of Time” (Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition, 2007).
4. Handout: Notes on Taoism
5. “Perfectionism versus Optimalism” Ben-Shahar, Tal, Being Happy: You Don't Have to Be Perfect to Lead a Richer, Happier Life, “Perfectionism versus Optimalism” (McGraw-Hill Education, 2010).
6. "Perfectionism is a Disease” Berkeley.http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/raising_happiness/post/perfectionism_is_a_disease.
7. Handout: Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics, selections.
8. Current articles

Week 7/Module 7:
Love, Empathy, Altruism, Compassion, and Kindness
1. “Happiness and Altruism” Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill, ch. 17, “Happiness and Altruism” (Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition, 2007).
2. “Darwin’s Touch: Survival of the Kindest” Dacher Keltner. http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/darwins_touch_survival_of_the_kindest
3. “Boundless Kindness” Hanson, R. and Mendius, R., Buddha’s Brain, The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love & Wisdom, ch. 10, “Boundless Kindness” (New Harbinger Publications, 2009).
4. “Practicing Acts of Kindness” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 5, “Happiness Activity No.4: Practicing Acts of Kindness” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
5. Handout: Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics, selections.
6. " The Compassionate Instinct" Dacher Keltner. http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/the_compassionate_instinct
7. Read: "The Buddhist and the Neuroscientist" http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/07/dalai-lama-neuroscience-compassion/397706/.
8. Current articles

Week 8/Module 8:
Social relationships, Security, Trust, and Forgiveness
1. “Nurturing Social Relationships” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 5, “Happiness Activity No. 5: Nurturing Social Relationships” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
2. “A Sociology of Happiness” Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill, ch. 15, “A Sociology of Happiness” (Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition, 2007).
3. Handout: Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics, selections.
4. “When Are You Sacrificing Too Much in Your Relationship?” Amie Gordon. http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/when_are_you_sacrificing_too_much_in_your_relationship.
5. “Social Support” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 10, “The Third How: Social Support” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
6. “Five Research-Based Ways to Say No” Amie Gordon. http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/5_research_based_ways_to_say_no
7. "Learning to Forgive" Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 6, “Happiness Activity No. 7: Learning to Forgive” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
8. “The Choice to Forgive” Fred Luskin. http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/the_choice_to_forgive/.
9. Current articles

Week 9/Module 9:
Meaning and Spirituality
1. "Practicing Religion and Spirituality" Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 9, “Happiness Activity No. 11: Practicing Religion and Spirituality” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
2. "Is a Happy Life Different from a Meaningful One?" Jason Marsh and Jill Suttie. http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/happy_life_different_from_meaningful_life
3. Sonja Lyubomirsky, "What Kind of Goals Should You Pursue?" Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 8, “Happiness Activity No. 10: What Kind of Goals Should You Pursue?"” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
4. Handout: Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics, selections.
5. “Happiness in the Presence of Death” Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill, ch. 23, “Happiness in the Presence of Death” (Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition, 2007).
6. “Science, Spirituality, and Humanity” Dalai Lama, The Universe in a Single Atom: The Convergence of Science and Spirituality, Conclusion, “Science, Spirituality, and Humanity” (Harmony; Reprint edition, September 12, 2006).
7. Current articles

Week 10/Module 10:
Optimism, Gross National Happiness, and End of the Semester Business
1. "Cultivating Optimism” Lyubomirsky, Sonja, The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want, ch. 4, “Happiness Activity No. 2: Cultivating Optimism” (Penguin Books; Reprint edition, December 30, 2008).
2. "Optimism about the Future" Seligman, Martin, Authentic Happiness, ch. 6, “Optimism about the Future” (Atria Books, 2004).
3. “Happiness Comes from in Between” Haidt, Jonathan, The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom, ch. 10, “Happiness Comes from in Between” (Basic Books; First Trade Paper Edition, December 1, 2006).
4. “Gross National Happiness Index Explained in Detail” Center for Bhutan Studies, http://www.grossnationalhappiness.com/articles/
5. “A Path” Ricard, Matthieu, Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill, ch. 24, “A Path” (Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition, 2007).
6. Handout: Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics, selections.
7. Current articles
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
Guest speakers: For each topic, short guest lectures from experts in the respective field supplement the readings and the instructor’s lectures. The guest lectures are delivered online through YouTube, Vimeo, and Ted talks. In most cases, the guests are the authors of the required readings. This structure brings the readings to “life,” accommodates different learning styles, and it is particularly suited for an online course.
1. Sonja Lyubomirsky, PhD, professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside.
2. Sam Berns, no scientist but very inspirational.
3. Roy Baumeister, PhD, professor of psychology at Florida State University.
4. Barry Schwartz, PhD, professor of social theory and social action at Swarthmore College.
5. Robert Emmons, PhD, professor of psychology at UC Davis.
6. Charles Duhigg, science writer for the New York Times.
7. Robert Sapolsky is a professor of biology, neuroscience, and neurosurgery at Stanford University.
8. Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD, professor emeritus of medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.
9. Dan Gilbert, PhD, professor of psychology at Harvard University.
10. Shauna Shapiro, PhD, professor of Counseling Psychology at Santa Clara University.
11. Michael I. Norton, PhD, professor of business administration at the Harvard Business School.
12. Martin Seligman, PhD, professor of psychology in the University of Pennsylvania.
13. Kristin Neff, PhD, associate professor in the University of Texas at Austin's department of educational psychology.
14. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, PhD, professor of psychology at Claremont Graduate University.
15. Sanjay Gupta, MD.
16. Alan Watts.
17. Christine Carter, PhD, senior fellow at the Greater Good Science Center at the University of California.
18. Tal Ben-Shahar, PhD, used to teach at Harvard University.
19. Daniel Willingham, PhD, professor of psychology at the University of Virginia.
20. Barbara Fredrickson , PhD, professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
21. Dacher Keltner, PhD, professor of psychology at University of California, Berkeley.
22. John Gottman, PhD, professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Washington.
23. Fred Luskin, PhD, director of the Stanford University Forgiveness Projects.
24. Jonathan Haidt, PhD, professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University’s Stern School of Business.
25. Michael F. Steger, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology at Colorado State University.
26. “The Prison of Your Mind" Sean Stephenson, no scientist, but very inspirational.
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesDavid AustinPhilosophy and Religious Studies.

03/07/2016: I had some comments on the proposed IDS 220 syllabus, the first two more significant than the last two.

I didn't see a record of consults with either Psychology or Philosophy & Religious Studies though all three disciplines are among those represented in the proposed IDS 220 Science and Art of Happiness (syllabus attached so that a trip to CIM isn't needed). Are those consults forthcoming? I'm not aware of any relevant contacts attempted with my department - I checked my email archives - but that doesn't necessarily mean that no attempts were made.

Given the criticisms made during the past 15 years of Gottman and others' work on couples, of Frederickson on positivity ratios more recently, as well as the very recent, highly spirited discussion of (failures of) replication in social psychology, it would be commendable if there was evidence that those criticisms were being taken into account in the course. In the unlikely event that the instructor is not already aware of the criticisms, I will send an 8.5 MB sampler separately.

Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics is focused on human well-being. It's not clear what human well-being has to do with contemporary work on happiness, in part because a good deal of contemporary work on happiness is less than clear on what's meant in any given body of research by "happiness." Perhaps that's the point of assigning the Nichomachean Ethics (though more modern discussions might be more accessible than translations of Aristotle's students' somewhat tortured notes).

I've never seen online videos (youtube, vimeo, etc.) described as "guest lectures" before but my sense of the terminology might be out of date.

Thanks.

David.

03/23/2016: My department has no objection to the course's being offered.

David.
College of Humanities and Social SciencesBob PondPsychology

03/09/2016: I suppose my biggest concern, aside from the ones that Dr. Austin brings up, is that psychology already offers a course in positive psychology that significantly overlaps with parts of IDS 220. It was approved as a new course around 2012 or 2013. The course number is PSY 313 and I've attached its syllabus (and accompanying information) to this message. It is not a GEP course. I believe that it is structured so that it more fully addresses the challenges that the subject of positive psychology presents for scientific investigation.

IDS 220 might be a nice complementing course to PSY 313, or vice versa. If I were a student who was really interested in the subject of happiness, I suppose I would find a way to take both courses. My concern is that the courses will be perceived by students as too similar to justify the number of credit hours involved if they were to take both courses. IDS 220 might work just fine for a student who is interested in the subject of happiness and is mainly interested in picking up a GEP- IP/GK/USD. Perhaps that's its the target audience. Overall, I think IDS 220 could be improved by including a module that addresses specifically critical thinking and the scientific method as applied to the subject of happiness. Obviously, it's an issue. --Bob

03/23/2016: My department has no objections to the course being offered, either. --Bob
College of Humanities and Social SciencesKathleen VogelI have worked with the instructor to address the issues raised by Psychology and Philosophy and Religious Studies. The instructor has added a module at the beginning of the course that addresses how to assess empirical studies of happiness. And, the instructor does not believe that the course overlaps with PSY 313 because IDS 220 is more of an overview, introductory course on happiness and geared towards a GEP audience.
College of SciencesJane LubischerDr. Tavakoli,

Thank you for the opportunity to take a closer look at your course The Science and Art of Happiness. I think the IP category should encourage exactly this sort of course, where you discuss a topic from different perspectives. I am pleased that your exploration of the critical concept of happiness incorporates a biological perspective, and believe it makes it a stronger course. Anything we can do to make it easier for more students to take this course, including adding it to the IP list so that it meets a GEP requirement for them, is a good thing.

I think we should be encouraging the development of courses like this that incorporate different disciplinary perspectives, without requiring that each discipline be fully represented as if it were on the GEP category list as well. Should this course be on the Natural Sciences list? Probably not. Should you have to represent Biology or Physiology or Neurobiology as a discipline in the same way? Absolutely not. Should you be required to include "sustained, rigorous and substantive instruction that focuses on the content and approaches" of biology? I don't think so (assuming we could even agree on what exactly that would look like). And while I hope every course at NC State is rigorous (because you can't learn much if you aren't challenged), we ultimately leave that in the hands of individual instructors, just as we do with pedagogical decisions.

The IP category should be used to encourage courses that bring different disciplines into the same conversation in an explicit and intentional manner, without requiring that they fully represent each discipline. I would encourage CUE to be more broadly inclusive when considering courses for the IP category. I would also encourage CUE to empower faculty who represent the various GEP categories to make decisions about courses for those categories. For example, my colleagues in humanities should make decisions about which courses qualify for the GEP Humanities course list -- I really shouldn't get a vote on that.
No new resources are required for this course offering. Instructor is compensated through DELTA summer school funding.

This course will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:


1. Distinguish among the distinct approaches to happiness in physiology, psychology, and ethics.

2. Identify and apply authentic connections in the study of happiness between physiology, psychology, and ethics.

3. Explore and synthesize approaches to happiness of physiology, psychology, and ethics.

4. Identify and examine distinguishing characteristics, including ideas, values, images, cultural artifacts, economic structures, technological or scientific developments, and/or attitudes of people in a society or culture outside the United States.

5. Compare the distinguishing characteristics between the non-U.S. society and at least one other society as they relate to people’s happiness.

6. Analyze how religious, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability and/or age identities are shaped by cultural and society influences.

7. Examine interactions between people from different religious, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability, and/or age groups in the U.S.

8. Appreciate the relevance of the various elements of happiness for their own lives as college students.

9. Apply and evaluate scientifically supported practices that enhance happiness.


Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, students will be able to:


1. Explain and differentiate the distinct approaches to happiness in physiology, psychology, and ethics.

2. Describe the mutual relevance of insights from physiology, psychology, and ethics into the nature of happiness.

3. Formulate a comprehensive, interdisciplinary model of the nature of happiness based on insights from physiology, psychology, and ethics.

4. Identify the relevance of the various elements of happiness for their own lives as college students.

5. Select and utilize scientifically supported practices that could enhance their happiness.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes4010 quizzes at 4 points each.
Written Assignment2010 written assignments at 2 points each. Grading rubrics: Intellectual Standards of Critical and Creative Thinking.
Discussion2010 class discussions at 2 points each. Grading rubrics: Intellectual Standards of Critical Thinking.
Major Paper15Grading rubrics: Intellectual Standards of Critical and Creative Thinking.
Final Exam5Assessment of students’ comprehension of the course materials.
The instructor holds a PhD in political science. He has been teaching interdisciplinary courses connecting science and ethics at NC State for 17 years, such as “IDS 201 Environmental Ethics” and “STS 302 Contemporary Science, Technology, and Human Values.”
despain (Tue, 15 Mar 2016 13:38:00 GMT): Rollback: Adjust GEP info, etc.
svhoward (Wed, 11 May 2016 17:31:08 GMT): Uploaded GEP Details with added summary of discussion requirements and grading. 5/11/2016
Key: 8642